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Workshop lighting

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WORKSHOP LIGHTING

WORKSHOP LIGHTING

This article by Mike Haughton in Model Engineers' Workshop 215 was well received. It's a very practical and informative survey of the options for lighting your workshop.

Clive Haynes 106/09/2014 22:15:26
8 forum posts

Hi, regarding Mike Haughton's article on workshop lighting I would like to add details of the lighting that I use in my workshop & garage.

Firstly I hate florescent lighting and seem to be constantly replacing tubes or starters. I have replaced all 10 units with LED units which I made from 50mm pvc trunking with the led self adhesive strips on the front face and the led driver on the inside of the trunking, with end caps in place the look quite neat. With this system you can tailor the fittings to your own requirements. The smd strips come in 5 meter lengths and in 2700 kelvin to over 6000.

Just a little correction to Mike's reference to the stagecoach wheels in old movies, this was due to the shutter speed of the movie camera.

Michael Horner07/09/2014 09:12:06
190 forum posts
50 photos
Posted by Clive Haynes 1 on 06/09/2014 22:15:26:

Hi, regarding Mike Haughton's article on workshop lighting I would like to add details of the lighting that I use in my workshop & garage.

Firstly I hate florescent lighting and seem to be constantly replacing tubes or starters. I have replaced all 10 units with LED units which I made from 50mm pvc trunking with the led self adhesive strips on the front face and the led driver on the inside of the trunking, with end caps in place the look quite neat. With this system you can tailor the fittings to your own requirements. The smd strips come in 5 meter lengths and in 2700 kelvin to over 6000.

Just a little correction to Mike's reference to the stagecoach wheels in old movies, this was due to the shutter speed of the movie camera.

Hi Clive

How long have you had your LED strips running? I made up strips for under cupboard lighting and in the begining the light was fantastic but over a short period of time (months) they dimmed. Inspection of the strip showed burn marks around the resistors. I used an ordinary wall wart smpsu with 12v regulated output. When the output was measured it was 12v. It could have been because they were behind a pelmet and so sat in the heat that they generated. A lighting website I was looking at suggested the strips should be mounted on heatsinks.

I have moved and at the moment I only have a single CFL plus machine lights and its not enough.

I was going to go back to florescents, when they failed replace them with LED tubes but that's expensive.

Cheers Michael.

Paul Narramore16/10/2015 14:35:00
avatar
34 forum posts
6 photos

These posts on workshop lighting have certainly gone to great lengths. Me? I like to keep things simple. What I have may not be the ideal lighting and power, but it suits me.

I bought my workshop (these seem to be called 'sheds' these days) on eBay, It is in timber and would easily store two cars although at the moment I store one kitcar and four motorbikes and still have lots of room. I had always wanted a decent, large workshop and for a mere £700 this fits the bill. To collect it my son and I hired a 7.5ton truck, and drove from Kent to Lancashire to dismantle it. As we live on the side of a steep hill, I created extensive foundations and a concrete floor. The workshop consisted of large tongue & groove panels and went up quickly. The roof has a shallow pitch and a strong steel A-frame holding the side walls together.

Anyway, back to the electrics. I fitted four large double fluorescent lights on the ceiling and most importantly, about five triple socket power points at waist height around the walls. I have a cantilever light alongside the workbench and a similar one next to the lathe.

The floor is covered with the old lounge carpet and a Calor Gas heater warms the place in the winter.

Frances IoM16/10/2015 14:50:27
573 forum posts
22 photos
there was an earlier set of posts re lighting - I installed the 600x600mm LED panels as used in offices (I used JCC cool white 36W but there are cheaper ones from ToolStation but catch I've found with such is that cheaper models often cut corners in manufacture - being using mine for well over a year in a cellar workshop + very happy with them
Ajohnw16/10/2015 15:45:35
3631 forum posts
160 photos

I had been using rather ancient starterless fluorescent strip lights. I'd guess the lighting units were installed in the 70's. One definitely was, another I bought used from a scrap yard. The starterless ones are what factories usually fit and last for ages. Tubes may last several years. Reasonable quality ones definitely do. I would say I have fitted 3 maybe 4 over 23 years. For some reason it seems these can only usually be bought from electrical wholesalers, The sort electricians use. They take the larger diameter tubes.

More recently as i am interested in photography and sometime post shots that will be viewed by rather critical people I have changed my workshop lighting to the colour temperature I should be using. The units have electronic ballasts. No idea how long etc these will last but no problems so far over maybe 2 years.

I decided to try these lights from Ikea for machine lighting. Nice even pool and no need for them to be close to the work. The can be clamped to a shelf or wall fixed. They come with 2 bases.

ikealamp.jpg

Trouble with the new main lighting - mix it with flash and what looks like rust / corrosion appears on some bright shiny bits. Might be something to do with using a Nikon V2 too. On the other hand it's handy and compact.

cheekyYes the is a sink under one end of the lathe. Big belfast type too, circa 1911.

John

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KWIL16/10/2015 17:09:09
3060 forum posts
56 photos

"Constantly replacing tubes and starters" In the last 27 years I have replaced 3 tubes and 2 starters, all fitted to units bought originally in 1960s. All 5ft 75/80W.

Must be somehing about the quality of tubes you buy and where you buy them.

Ajohnw16/10/2015 17:43:11
3631 forum posts
160 photos

I don't get it either KWIL. We have one strip light with a starter that probably got fitted in the 70's or even earlier and still no problems with it. Actually I have never replaced a tube in that one but it's only turned on and off a couple of times a day. The others are on a lot of the time. My workshop one virtually all day as there is no natural light. My PC is there too.

Perhaps the answer to avoid buying off DIY stores or ebay. Find an electrical wholesaler. If an electrician fits something it's expected to last.

Things are "improving". I fitted a D light into a bathroom. The first tube lasted a very long time, it came in the light. The replacement lasted maybe 18 months. I complained when I replace that one around 3 years ago. So far so good.

One thing to watch I fitted 2 in another bathroom - these D lights take a fair old current spike when they are turned on. One can stop the other from firing up correctly. House probably rewired by the MEB and min sized lighting wire used.

John

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geoff warner16/10/2015 18:19:24
7 forum posts

just a reminder to mr paul narrowmore watch that calor gas heater I scrapped mine due to it being a danger to my health

Neil Lickfold16/10/2015 20:30:19
512 forum posts
89 photos

I have had the LED strip lighting in my shed for 3 years now. I would not have anything else. I am slowly converting the rest of the work areas with LED strips as well. The better ones are with the Ali extrusion and have a scatter / frosted plastic diffuser, the 1st ones were just mounted underneath the tool shelf without any covers. I have had no issues with either yet. I like the instant Turn on, and the now lower power bill as well. Not driving KW's of lighting in the shed anymore. The incandescent were changed with LED, but I really do like the better light spread from the underneath side of a shelf. I see now there are a larger choice in the light spread of the LED's now , angle of spread, and a huge variety of colour temps as well as varing lumin output per meter length.

Neil

Ajohnw17/10/2015 08:57:28
3631 forum posts
160 photos

The Ikea wall / clamp on light is LED. I prefer to buy LED lighting from Ikea because unlike some the don't offer high colour temperature led lighting. Most of it is 2,700K. Sweden is always cautious and I feel they are right to do that in this area because of the amount of blue that needs to be added.

John

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john fletcher 117/10/2015 09:47:15
487 forum posts

Off the topic some what, to Paul Narramore. Paul what was the cost of hiring the 7.5 ton lorry , does that include insurance and does one have to have a HGV licence to drive one. John

Ajohnw17/10/2015 10:22:47
3631 forum posts
160 photos

If you have cat C1 on your licence you can drive a vehicle up to 7.5 tonne. Otherwise I think it's 3.5. They are classed as medium sized vehicles. HGV's are something else again, the truck part might weigh more than 7.5 tonne with a laden trailer on the back of it.

Quick google

**LINK**

I think most UK full driving licenses have C1 E on it.

If you do hire one you might find air brakes a little different. It seems some do.

John

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KWIL17/10/2015 12:30:28
3060 forum posts
56 photos

Reversing a 3.5 tonne air braked down hill is quite an experience if you want to use the "handbrake".

On the subject of so called low power LED lighting versus old fashioned Fluorescent, how do you heat your workshop?

I see no difference in paying for the power wastage from the lighting to the equivalent electrical power used for heating! Apart from that, machine motor power losses are probably higher as well.

Ajohnw17/10/2015 12:55:42
3631 forum posts
160 photos

If some one wants to hire something big I would suggest a flat bed. That way visibility is good and if the item isn't strapped down enough it can be watched as it comes off rather than going through the side of whatever it is.

Heating cost over the house in my case = zero but I haven't got a lot of space.

People with an attached garage would probably find it cheaper to extend the central heating and add a radiator valve - one of the early wax stat types from what I have heard about some of the newer ones.

John

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