By continuing to use this site, you agree to our use of cookies. Find out more
Forum sponsored by:
Forum sponsored by Allendale Jan 24th

studs

All Topics | Latest Posts

Search for:  in Thread Title in  
Richard chucklbutty19/06/2014 19:05:28
57 forum posts
3 photos

Is there an accepted way to lock stud threads in place without threadlock compound ?

The only way i know is to put a chisel mark across the threads, and lightly sieze it in.

Keith Long19/06/2014 19:34:23
845 forum posts
11 photos

Why would you want to avoid a threadlocking compound? They come in different grades from easily removable to "forget it" so there should be one for just about any application. Seems to me the chisel mark on the threads is running too high a risk of damaging the thread that you're screwing the stud into.

Keith

WALLACE19/06/2014 19:37:56
304 forum posts
17 photos
I vaguely remember a method where the stud is centred with a drill at the end and split radially with a hacksaw - or fine slitting saw if you're a perfectionist. ..
A dollop of grease is used to hold a ball bearing in place in the centre hole, when tightened this deforms the split end and holds the stud in place.

No idea if it works or not !


W.
Dusty19/06/2014 19:52:48
479 forum posts
8 photos

Why on earth would you want to go to such extreme lengths to secure a stud, they should be removable for maintenence. Use a stud box to tighten the stud into its hole, job done. The stud can be removed at a later date by use of the said stud box. I can hear you saying what's a stud box, in it's simplist form it is a short length of hexagon bar with a tapped hole through the centre to suit size of stud, a bolt is inserted the other end. In use the box is threaded onto the stud the bolt tightened against the stud and the stud can be wound in with a spanner, when it is tight slacken the bolt and uscrew the hexagon bar. Simples, and no sign of thread lock or stud lock. Oh and you need two spanners to tighten and release the bolt.

julian atkins19/06/2014 23:51:41
avatar
1235 forum posts
353 photos

i agree 100% with Dusty!

cheers,

julian

Trevorh20/06/2014 09:13:06
avatar
302 forum posts
87 photos

I have used all of those methods in the past but only when I was in Heavy engineering, in those days stud loctite wasn't around and when you put a stud in it was there for as long as the machine existed, the split end and ball bearing worked the best as it acted the same as a rawl bolt

But either way as Dusty says you will get the best result using a box tube - we use to make up our owns sets of them as apprentices - all Whit from 1/4 - 1", as well as most of you tools you'd be needing

cheers

Tim Stevens20/06/2014 18:48:00
avatar
1268 forum posts

One of the problems with tightening a stud in a threaded hole can be the distortion of the metal around the hole - making the surface unfit for bolting to another flat surface. One answer is to counterbore the thread a few turns, so that any pressure from the run-out occurs below the sensitive surface.

Loctite etc can reduce such problems, so its up to the user.

Cheers, Tim

Bob Brown 120/06/2014 19:03:46
avatar
1016 forum posts
127 photos

If you need to remove a bolt, stud, nut or shaft that has had a retaining compound applied in almost all case it is easier to undo if the parts are heated only 200 degrees is enough to get most to let go the exception is high temp thread locking compounds. Needless to say none work much above 250 degrees .

Bob

stan pearson 120/06/2014 19:26:39
avatar
135 forum posts
2 photos

That's spot on Bob I used Loctite to secure the wheels of my Black 5 tender and put one of the axle boxes on wrong way round, a call to Loctite problem solved just warm up in oven to 200c and the wheel pulled off with no damage done. I wouldn't rivet over small studs we have moved on since those days, even split pins are nearly a thing of the past

Stan

Bob Brown 120/06/2014 20:12:35
avatar
1016 forum posts
127 photos

Just pulled an axle apart on my class 8 as the retainer had failed and one wheel was not driving, cleaned it all up with acetone and used 620 as I happened to have some, had some other stuff but binned it as it was a year past its use by date. It may have been ok but having removed it all I was not willing to take a chance.

Test day tomorrow smiley

The end cranks are held with a grub screw but think I may change that over the winter to a 1/8 tapered pin and Loctite on the shaft, belt and braces.

Studs! Loctite every time and nothing too serious as you may need to get them out, stripped thread on the nut end springs to mind.

Split pins now replaced with R clips no more struggling to fold the legs back and get them straight enough to get it through the hole, for critical applications us locking wire.

Bob

John Haine20/06/2014 20:13:40
3328 forum posts
176 photos

A pair of nuts tightened against each other on the stud is a handy substitute for a stud box. You can tighten the stud into its threaded hole with a spanner on the top nut, then apply a second spanner to the bottom one to loosen and remove. Simples.

stan pearson 120/06/2014 22:27:02
avatar
135 forum posts
2 photos

Served my time starting in 1958 most important parts were split pined then we went onto Nylock nuts and Bedford went one further in the mid 1960 when they used Loctite even on big end bolts and differential parts, the big end bolts were covered in Loctite and stretched to a given length when removed you had to fit new ones.

Stan

Bob Brown 121/06/2014 07:53:04
avatar
1016 forum posts
127 photos

Horse hair, bits of hemp, string, chewing gum, cotton, begs the question in this day and age, why? when there is Loctite or similar.

Off to chase a horse!

Nick Hughes21/06/2014 13:24:32
avatar
233 forum posts
133 photos

I was taught to make the threads on the stud (only on the end that is screwed into the part) oversize, so that you have in effect a slight interferance fit.

Also 2nd the Counterbore or at the least a good CSK.

Michael Gilligan21/06/2014 16:14:07
avatar
16360 forum posts
712 photos
Posted by Bogstandard2 on 21/06/2014 11:29:25:

How do you think engineers got around the problems 100 years ago? ...

Maybe we should raise a post asking about how to do things using old fashioned techniques ...

.

Well-said, John

[although I do like Loctite]

Let me nominate this amazing little book, from 1908, as an essential download for anyone of like mind.

... It's worth reading the Preface.

MichaelG

Edited By Michael Gilligan on 21/06/2014 16:15:13

Bill Starling21/06/2014 19:44:19
97 forum posts

Posted by Bogstandard2 on 21/06/2014 11:29:25:

How do you think engineers got around the problems 100 years ago? ...

Maybe we should raise a post asking about how to do things using old fashioned techniques ...

-----------------------

Yes please - in addition to the wonderful book recommended by MichaelG.

Thank you in anticipation.

Bill.

Billy Mills21/06/2014 20:49:00
377 forum posts

MichaelG

Have you ever seen this? **LINK** There is enough here to keep one occupied for a few years. Although a bit OT for some, others might get a lot out of this work.

I first read this book as a sixth former, it has since become very expensive so after looking at MichaelG's reccomendation I had a look for my "fave" and found it for free! . Stong produced the "Amateur Scientist" section of Scientific American magazine for very many years. He also produced a very good book on Lab practice which is very much more detailed on glassworking, optical work and many other topics including kinematic design. I have a copy but will see if I can find it online.

Billy.

Michael Gilligan21/06/2014 21:39:00
avatar
16360 forum posts
712 photos
Posted by Billy Mills on 21/06/2014 20:49:00:

MichaelG

Have you ever seen this? **LINK** There is enough here to keep one occupied for a few years. Although a bit OT for some, others might get a lot out of this work.

.

Thanks, Billy

What a great find ... and there is something rather "Global Village" about the fact that the copy they scanned came from Poulton-le-Fylde college !!

At the risk of stating the obvious; some may not be aware that these "Internet Archive" books are downloadable in various formats.

MichaelG.

Billy Mills21/06/2014 21:48:31
377 forum posts

Should have mentioned Holtzapffel's Turning and mechanical manipulation- all five volumes. Has an enormous amount of material including tangential turning tools ( nearly 200 years old) and early leadscrews.

Could not find "Modern Physical Laboratory Practice" J Strong online ( it is John Strong not CL Stong- my mistake. )

Billy.

Michael Gilligan21/06/2014 22:34:44
avatar
16360 forum posts
712 photos

Billy,

I forgot to mention ... The Amateur Scientist is now published on CD

SurplusShed stocks v4

... it's worth keeping an eye out for their Sales

MichaelG.

All Topics | Latest Posts

Please login to post a reply.

Magazine Locator

Want the latest issue of Model Engineer or Model Engineers' Workshop? Use our magazine locator links to find your nearest stockist!

Find Model Engineer & Model Engineers' Workshop

Support Our Partners
ChesterUK
Eccentric July 5 2018
cowells
emcomachinetools
EngineDIY
Warco
Eccentric Engineering
Subscription Offer

Latest "For Sale" Ads
Latest "Wanted" Ads
Get In Touch!

Do you want to contact the Model Engineer and Model Engineers' Workshop team?

You can contact us by phone, mail or email about the magazines including becoming a contributor, submitting reader's letters or making queries about articles. You can also get in touch about this website, advertising or other general issues.

Click THIS LINK for full contact details.

For subscription issues please see THIS LINK.

Digital Back Issues

Social Media online

'Like' us on Facebook
Follow us on Facebook

Follow us on Twitter
 Twitter Logo

Pin us on Pinterest