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3 1/2 inch small boilered TICH

Construction of TICH according to the words and music by LBSC

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Ryan Norton15/10/2014 07:24:13
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190 forum posts
774 photos

Graham

As Juian has said, doing the axleboxes in the four jaw is probably the easiest. If you follow the "Words and music" you will find that LBSC managed to do things very quickly with the minimum amount of effort and yet still yeilded precise results.

If you look at my photos, I milled the bar used for the axleboxes on both sides to create the flange. this bar was then cut into four pieces and finished to size. Two of the embryo axleboxes were then placed together with the unflanged ends touching. Two pieces of scrap of the correct size were then inserted between the flanges as Julian describes above and the whole magoby placed into the four jaw.

It is important to note here that placing all these bits into the four jaw requires a bit of finess and that you need to make sure that the two faces of the axleboxes are definately touching each other.

The rest really is very easy. Using a sharp drill with the edges backed off, drill through, after using a center drill. I used a 9.9mm final drill and then reamed the holes to 10mm as I only have 10mm silver steel stock available.

Regards,

Ryan

Graham Powell 115/10/2014 09:38:55
11 forum posts

Hello Ryan,

Its all your fault!. Being so impressed with your write up and pictures I decided to have a go myself. I have a fairly well equipped little workshop but 3.5 inch engines will be about the limit if I am to get in there as well. I have the castings for the wheels, hornblocks and axleboxes. ( Very prompt service from GLR Kennions). So far I have made the frames and yesterday made the little clamp to hold the hornblocks for milling. Today I am hoping to cut the buffer beams. I am following the LBSC book as far as possible with help and advice from chaps on the Forum. Later on in the book, LBSC advocates drilling the steam ports by hand. This sounds like a recipe for disaster in my opinion. How did you do yours? I am not too worried about having a working locomotive . I am just hoping to get a chassis that will run on air and if that works obtain a boiler. I shall probably get Helen at Western Steam to make they boiler as they are only just down the road. Keep the pictures and write up coming. I am sure I am not the only one inspired by your efforts.

rgds

Graham Powell

Ryan Norton15/10/2014 09:54:22
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190 forum posts
774 photos

Thats right blame me. As long as more people build this little beaut im alright with it.

Im glad you're inspired!

LBSC talks of drilling the ports by hand, probably using an old hand drill, which is slow and therefore easy to control.

I drilled my ports in the drill press with the vice clamped to the press table at the required angle. This operation is difficult to set up as you need to line up the drill on the outside of the cylinder to see if the alignment is correct.

I drew the placement of the ports in pencil on the side and used this for alignment.

Be very careful of the drill pulling into the cylinder and going straight through all the ports, I have had this happen before and it is not easy to fix.

If a milling machine is available to you, it would be esier to drill the steam holes. Give me a shout when you get closer to this operation and we can chat.

Some advice on the buffer beams, LBSC indicates that the rivets should have the heads on the inside and the outsides filed flush, which is what I've done. In hind site I would have preferred seeing the rivet heads on the outside of the beams next to the buffers.

Just a thought.

Good luck with the rest of your work!

Graham Powell 115/10/2014 13:58:16
11 forum posts

Hi Ryan,

Thanks for that. I am still at that very early stage but I will be picking your brains as I go along. I'll ask about the cylinders when I get to them . Yours are beautifully finished. Certainly drilling the ports seems to be very tricky but I will cross that bridge when I get to it.

All the best

rgds

Graham Powell

David Haynes15/10/2014 14:12:31
168 forum posts
26 photos

Graham,

Take great care with the ports however you do them, I did mine on a vertical slide in the lathe and was not satisfied with the result, I wish I had the milling machine I have now when I did them. You might find when drilling any 'small delicate/critical hole' that if you start one or even two drill sizes down and gradually work up to size, this can give some chance to recover a mistake. Despite this and what seems like a high amount of errors in my Tich construction, along with my own doubts and expecting it to fail, the chassis happily burst into life with about 20 PSI. A tribute to the robustness of Walchaerts' valve gear and the LBSC design. On the subject of exposed rivet heads in buffer beams, it has been discussed here or elsewhere; they look nice but are a pain to paint and in prototypical practice, many are hidded anyway!

Dave

Graham Powell 115/10/2014 18:32:39
11 forum posts

Hi David,

Why is using a milling machine better?. Is it a question of cutting speed or slower rate of feed. I do have a small milling machine which I think the tailstock chuck on the lathe will fit. Not got that far yet still on the buffer beams

( one of which I cut to the wrong length - definitely a case of measure twice, cut once.

rgds

Graham Powell

David Haynes15/10/2014 23:00:30
168 forum posts
26 photos

A lathe with a vertical slide is an approximation of a milling machine but may not be as rigid a set up as a milling machine. The vertical slide introduces another element into the path of fixing the work piece to the machine bed. As many more experienced people here than me will tell you, if you have a high degree of confidence in the accuracy of your lathe operation and vertical slide and take things slowly, it will be fine. A poor milling machine set up could be the worse option. Also, it is not recommended to use ordinary 3 jaw chucks for holding milling cutters, they can screw out during use and the chucks are not designed for lateral milling forces. I personally find I have more control and precision for some jobs with the mill.

Dave

Graham Powell 116/10/2014 08:41:03
11 forum posts

Hi David,

Thanks for that. When I get to that bit, I will take it all on board before deciding what to do. When facing off the cylinder castings etc what do you recommend in the way of tooling and lathe speed etc. Ryan has a wonderful finish on the components he has done. Still that is a little way at the moment.

Bye for now

rgs

Graham Powell

Ryan Norton17/10/2014 07:08:26
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190 forum posts
774 photos

Hi Graham

When facing the cylinder castings, tooling and speed is something you will need to work out through trial and error. LBSC gives an indication that a round nose tool placed perpendicular to the cylinder face should be used. Obviously, being a rather large piece of metal, your speed should be on the lower end and make sure include a counter weight on the face plate or your lathe will wobble!

The finish of your tool will also make a huge difference here and therefore trying different speeds with your tool at slightly different angles may help with a better finish.

I placed the finished cylinders onto a piece of emery paper on a piece of float glass and lightly rubbed them with a circular movement to obtain the finish you see in the photos. This finish is often used on wobbler cylinder faces to ensure an almost steam tight fit when oil is introduced.

I thought it would be appropriate here as we need a similar fit with the valve.

Hope this helps.

Graham Powell 117/10/2014 07:58:15
11 forum posts

Hi Ryan

Thanks for the sound advice. it does appear that although LBSC covered the building in some detail, you need to be able to work out some things for yourself. Not a bad thing in reality. I found it a good way to learn how to do things in the past. I normally work in a much smaller scale ( Gauge 0) and I use the emery cloth on a piece of plate glass to get a nice smooth finish on the backs of the wheels.

regards

Graham

Graham Powell 129/10/2014 15:10:50
11 forum posts

Stupid question time!. In his book LBSC says fairly often "drill 1/4 inch and thread 1/4 x 40 tpi " as an example.
Surely when tapping holes you need to drill a tapping size hole or have I got that wrong!. Seems a bit vague to me.

rgds

Graham Powell

IanT29/10/2014 17:06:50
1266 forum posts
128 photos

There's no stupid questions Graham (not if you don't know the answer anyway)

Yes, the drill for tapping will be smaller than the given size of the thread. The only question for Whit & Metric threads really is the percentage of thread engagement you require. Industry use quite high percentages but for amateur use - lower percentages (e.g 70-65%) are easier to tap, lower the risk of breaking the tap and are quite strong enough.

So I use Tubal Cain's recommendations generally - and in this case for a 1/4" 40tpi (ME) thread I would therefore drill 5.8mm tapping - as he gives in his "Model Engineers Handbook" (a recommended reference for us Amateurs!).

Regards,

IanT

 

Edited By IanT on 29/10/2014 17:10:45

IanT29/10/2014 17:19:51
1266 forum posts
128 photos

PS But of course when using a die - the material should be the same diameter as the nominal size of the die.

However, one small suggestion if you haven't done this too often. It can help to machine a slightly narrower 'lead-in' (when possible) to help the die get started. Of course a tail-stock die (and tap) holder is also a great help to keep the thread straight.

IanT

Graham Powell 130/10/2014 08:48:36
11 forum posts

Hello Ian and all fellow Tich builders, Many thanks for that. I thought I was on the right track but surprised that LBSC did not mention it. I am lucky in that I have managed to acquire some ME taps and dies. Yesterday I managed to finish off the 2nd buffer beam and had a go at assembling the frames. I was quite pleased with the result as it all sat level on a piece of plate glass and was all square as well. I won't fix it all together permanently until I 've done the hornblocks which is the next job in the book. regards

Graham Powell

IanT30/10/2014 09:13:48
1266 forum posts
128 photos

You are welcome Graham.

As a suggestion - I keep my ME taps purely for non-ferrous (mainly brass) materials. Once taps or dies are used on ferrous metals they don't seem to cut brass quite as well again. So I generally use (cheaper) metric taps these days on any ferrous work - except where I'm working on a model (my G3 engines & rolling stock) where I will tend to use BA taps - but even here I use new ones on brass for as long as possible - and only "older" ones on mild steel etc.

My better 'fine' files are the same (especially my Swiss files) - just used on brass. They will last a long time used like this. I use cheaper (or worn) files for any ferrous work and they have a blob of blue paint on them.

This might seem to be a bit nit picking but does repay the effort over time and soon becomes second nature.

Regards,

IanT

stephen.12/11/2014 19:05:00
19 forum posts
12 photos

Hello all

I wonder if you can help me with a query on tiches valve gear, i have notised that some measurements are different in the book to the drawing. firstly the return crank centres are 11/16 in the book and 39/64 on the drawings giving i think 5/64 difference. secondly the combination lever (vertical rod) shows on the drawings to be 8 thou longer between centres with writing saying it has 10 thou lead (this is the two lower hole distances). If i have not explained it well, please say and i could take some pictures of the relivent drawings.

Does anyone know which we should be following?

Your help would be much appreciated

many thanks

Stephen

MK12/11/2014 19:25:20
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24 forum posts
20 photos
Posted by stephen. on 12/11/2014 19:05:00:

Hello all

I wonder if you can help me with a query on tiches valve gear, i have notised that some measurements are different in the book to the drawing. firstly the return crank centres are 11/16 in the book and 39/64 on the drawings giving i think 5/64 difference. secondly the combination lever (vertical rod) shows on the drawings to be 8 thou longer between centres with writing saying it has 10 thou lead (this is the two lower hole distances). If i have not explained it well, please say and i could take some pictures of the relivent drawings.

Does anyone know which we should be following?

Your help would be much appreciated

many thanks

Stephen

I would want to know this as well, as I'm building TICH as well. I see what you're talking about with the return crank, but I can't see anything about the combination lever that is 1 7/16" between the two holes.

Edited By MK on 12/11/2014 19:26:29

Ryan Norton12/11/2014 20:58:28
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190 forum posts
774 photos

I am going to need to check this as well!

Stephen and MK

I have just looked at the original 1950's article and there is no size description of the return crank. LBSC just refers to them as "another plain filing job".

The drawing in this article indicates 11/16'" between centres.

 

Hope this helps.

 

Ill check my book when I get home!

Edited By Ryan Norton on 12/11/2014 21:28:25

Ryan Norton12/11/2014 21:22:41
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190 forum posts
774 photos

It has been a while since I did anything on my dear old Tich.

This week I decided to start a relatively simple task of machining the slide valves.

I figured it would be a good way to get back into it and also get used to the newish mill as most of my previous machining has been done on the lathe.

So here are a few pictures of what has become of the brass block thus far:

v01.jpg

v03.jpg

v05.jpg

v09.jpg

v11.jpg

v15.jpg

v20.jpg

v22.jpg

v24.jpg

Please excuse my terrible marking out, I had a couple of slips as you can see. but the marking out was purely a guide as the mill was used to obtain all the distances etc.

stephen.13/11/2014 17:28:14
19 forum posts
12 photos

Please see below photos of the drawings which differ from the book, i purchased them from my hobbies store and i belief they are the same supplied by reeves.

Apologies Ryan for cluttering up your build diary but i am sure it may be of help to us all to make sure we are using the correct dimentions. your diary has been very usefull and interesting by the way

many thanks

Stephen

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