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Coolant Pump

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Paul Lousick28/03/2013 22:33:40
1216 forum posts
502 photos

Just taken delivery of an inexpensive coolant pump complete with strainer and fittings which was advertised on e-bay for $24.56 inc postage to Australia from Hong Kong. Took about 10 days for delivery. But the pump failed to work (open circuit on the power cable). A return message to the company was answered straight away and a replacement sent which works well. Excellent waranty service!

Initial tests with water: Pumps about 1ltre/minute at 1m head height. Also sucks water with 900mm hose connected to inlet.

coolant pump.jpg


AC 220V 50/60Hz Electromagnetic Fuel Magnetic Drive Pump for Lathe
Specification:
Product Name Magnetic Drive Pump
Model DC-1100
Cable Length 52cm/20.5"
Voltage AC 220V
Frequency 50, 60Hz
Material Metal, Plastic
Outlet Dia 6.3mm/0.24"
Tail Hole Inner Dia 7.7m/0.3"
Mounting Size 2 x 2cm/0.78" x 0.78"(L*W)
Mounting Hole Dia 5mm/0.2"
Size 11 x 4 x 5cm/4.3" x 1.57" x 2"(L*W*T)
Color As Picture Shown
Net Weight 322g
Package Content 1 x Magnetic Drive Pump

Description:
Feature: AC 220V, 6.3mm outlet dia, 50/60Hz.
Ideal for transferring abrasive chemicals and corrosive liquids e.g acids, adhesives, coolants, liquid metal.
Special design for mini lathe, milling machine, grinding machine, drilling machine, etc.

Web address:

http://www.ebay.com.au/itm/AC-220V-50-60Hz-Electromagnetic-Fuel-Magnetic-Drive-Pump-for-Lathe-Machine-/390509459580

or web site:

http://stores.ebay.com.au/au-deal-store (search for magnetic pump)

Long link edited.

Edited By John Stevenson on 28/03/2013 22:53:27

Speedy Builder529/03/2013 10:37:01
1843 forum posts
128 photos

Is it a non rotary type of pump? If it is a shuttle type of magnetic pump, let us know how you get on with minute swarf particles. It might be an idea to put some form of a magnet between the filter and pump to collect magnetic particles. What sort of delivery rate do you get at say 1 meter head. Will it 'self prime' and at what height. Seems like an interesting low cost pump. Keep us up to date please.

NJH29/03/2013 10:52:24
avatar
2314 forum posts
139 photos

I note that they will not supply this to the UK or, indeed, many other countries. Maybe I'm paranoid but I'd much prefer a low voltage unit for this application.

Norman

Les Jones 129/03/2013 11:00:21
2097 forum posts
144 photos

Hi Paul,
I am sceptcal about the statement "Ideal for transferring abrasive chemicals and corrosive liquids e.g acids, adhesives, coolants, liquid metal." It looks likes parts are made of brass which is not very corrosion resistant. The only metal I know that is liquid at room temperature is mercury and I think that would dissolve the brass parts. (I can't imagine anyone wanting to pump mercury anyway.) The fact that I do not believe its corrosion resitance makes me not trust the claim to be abrasive resistant.

Les.

Andrew Johnston29/03/2013 11:33:40
avatar
4948 forum posts
563 photos
Posted by NJH on 29/03/2013 10:52:24:

Maybe I'm paranoid but I'd much prefer a low voltage unit for this application.

Possibly! The coolant pump I installed on my CNC mill is 240V single phase, and all my other coolant pumps are 415V three phase. I've never had any electrical issues with the pumps, other than two winding failures on the Bridgeport, where I've now installed a new (generic) 415V pump.

Andrew

Paul Lousick29/03/2013 12:09:20
1216 forum posts
502 photos

Not sure if it is a rotary type of pump or not. Suspect it is not as it produces a vibratory sound. From my first test, it will self prime vertically with a 900mm suction hose and deliver approx. 1 litre/min.

I plan to incorporafe a magretic filter and a strainer to collect swarf in the coolant. Would also prefer a low voltage pump but will ensure that wiring is protected. Also have earth leakage protection on the power circuit in case of electrical failure.

At a cost of $25 it is worth trying. (should be better than the car windscreen pump which I am currently using). Will keep you updated after further testing.

Paul.

Edited By Paul Lousick on 29/03/2013 12:11:14

NJH29/03/2013 13:19:44
avatar
2314 forum posts
139 photos

Andrew

OK your pumps are probably specifically designed units. Would you take a chance on a unit ( specified as 220v not 240v) from an unknown ebay seller in Hong Kong? I must say too that the construction, from the picture, does not give me confidence. I hope for Paul's sake that it's OK but 220/240 volts, unknown quality /safety standards, liquids and metalwork don't fit well together for me.

Norman

Roderick Jenkins29/03/2013 15:00:24
avatar
1786 forum posts
461 photos

Norman,

I believe that Australia, like the UK, now specifies its voltage as 230 +10% -6%. Europe centres its voltage at 220 but the standards within the tolerances are effectively the same. 220V is pretty much the world standard apart from the US.

Rod

Andrew Johnston29/03/2013 15:55:22
avatar
4948 forum posts
563 photos
Posted by NJH on 29/03/2013 13:19:44:

OK your pumps are probably specifically designed units. Would you take a chance on a unit ( specified as 220v not 240v) from an unknown ebay seller in Hong Kong? I must say too that the construction, from the picture, does not give me confidence. I hope for Paul's sake that it's OK but 220/240 volts, unknown quality /safety standards, liquids and metalwork don't fit well together for me.

Point taken; yes my pumps are specifically for coolant, bought online from a UK company, although I recall that they were made in Italy.

Correct, I wouldn't take a chance on a unit bought from Hongkong via Ebay. But then again I've never bought anything from Honkong on Ebay, and can't see myself ever doing so.

I did have a problem with the single phase coolant pump I bought, in that it was 110V, not 240V. When I rang the supplier to complain they got really shirty and told me I didn't know diddly squat about electrics as all their paperwork clearly stated that the pump was 240V. So I asked why it had 110V stamped on it? Silence; followed by muttering about checking the stores. When they called back they had changed tune completely, all their 240V stock of that model was in fact 110V. Of course they swapped the pump for a 240V one, plus various mutterings about 'sorting' their supplier!

Regards,

Andrew

NJH29/03/2013 16:28:37
avatar
2314 forum posts
139 photos

Hi Rod

Yes it seems that you are quite right. I came across this little snippet that maybe explains how it came about :-

 

" The EU decided, in its wisdom, to harmonise the UK standard mains voltage of 240v AC and the European standard of 220v AC, at 230v AC. Fine in theory but the costs of replacing all the supply equipment to deliver 230v was uneconomic (there being no advantage whatever in changing, other than "harmonisation". So to avoid accusations of failure to harmonise, they simply fiddled with the legal voltage limits, nothing actually changed!.

The law now states 230v +10% -6%, thereby allowing the European 220v system to stay at 220v and UK to stay at 240v, yet both appear to be harmonised! "

 

No doubt, in time, they will use the same wisdom to harmonise the value of the Pound and the Euro by setting a common value of about tuppence halfpenny! ( We may not need to wait long)

Cheers

Norman

Edited By NJH on 29/03/2013 16:30:13

Russell Eberhardt30/03/2013 11:23:58
avatar
2500 forum posts
85 photos

The EU mains voltage standard is actually 230 V plus or minus 10%. Thus it neatly covers the old 240 V ± 6% and 220 V ± 6%. So if equipment is made to the new standard it should work anywhere in Europe.

A rare case of them getting it right?

Russell.

Muzzer01/04/2013 22:05:57
avatar
2904 forum posts
448 photos

When you start looking at requirements for products that you intend to sell for use anywhere in the world, you rapidly discover that there is no real level of standardisation, even within the EU. In some places like parts of Australia you see over 250V, in other countries less than 200V. And then there's Japan, where you may find 50 or 60Hz and anywhere from 85-120V. And that's just talking single phase. But we do love to knock the EU!

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