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Champion No 1 sensitive drill (made in England)

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Dennis WA19/04/2012 08:35:20
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79 forum posts
5 photos

I have just acquired this from a friend. Does anyone know who made these?

Thanks

Dennis

Ady119/04/2012 09:04:31
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5169 forum posts
738 photos

I will have a wild stab at this

http://www.championcuttingtool.com/_index_home.html

Dennis WA19/04/2012 10:42:13
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79 forum posts
5 photos

Champion Cutting Tool is a long-established American firm - my sensitive drill is UK-made, with a big 1950's style label "Champion No 1 Made in England"

Terryd19/04/2012 10:45:52
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1936 forum posts
179 photos

Hi Dennis,

There was also a Champion machine tool company in the United Kingdom, although I have no information about them. I'm not sure if they were related to the US company of the same name or completely independant. Sorry not to be of more help.

Regards

Terry

Dennis WA19/04/2012 10:51:59
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79 forum posts
5 photos

Terry...Tony's http://www.lathes.co.uk/ lists Champion UK in his " incomplete list of Manufacturers and Brands" - there is no other information.

Regards

Dennis

Edited By Dennis WA on 19/04/2012 10:56:03

Terryd19/04/2012 11:04:08
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1936 forum posts
179 photos

Hi Dennis,

I came across this, not much but at least a picture smile. The pictured machine reminds me of one I had in a school workshop used as a point of interest and discussion. Couldn't use it due to unguarded rotating bits.

Regards

Terry

IanT19/04/2012 12:15:22
2002 forum posts
212 photos

Modifications to the 'Champion' 1/4" drill were described by 'Duplex' (probably in ME but haven't found the issues) and I'm pretty sure it was a British product. I have the Duplex "In the Workshop" volumes (published in 1951) and (in volume 3) Duplex descibes the Champion as a machine "which has been widely used for many years past".

The modifications by the way are to increase the speed range. They also describe a similar mod for the 3/8" Cowells drill - one of which I happen to own (but have not so far modified).

Regards,

IanT

Terryd19/04/2012 17:00:18
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1936 forum posts
179 photos
Posted by IanT on 19/04/2012 12:15:22:

Modifications to the 'Champion' 1/4" drill were described by 'Duplex' (probably in ME but haven't found the issues) and I'm pretty sure it was a British product................

Regards,

IanT

Hi Ian T,

The article which I think you are referring to is in issue 2508, p 548, 1949, vol. 100.

Regards

Terry

Dennis WA19/04/2012 19:43:37
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79 forum posts
5 photos

Thank you Terry and IanT for your feedback.

The link to Champion (Machine Tools) in Graces Guide shows a picture of the drilling machine - it is identical to the one I have acquired, which, after removing some surface rust on the exposed steel column etc, is in very good condition.

Fortunately I have old MEs from 1939 onwards ( bought cheaply many years ago) and following up on your leads there are the ME articles by "Duplex" in issue 2500 (pg 478) and 2502 (pg 548) of Vol 100 (January - June 1949) dealing with extending the speed range of a 3/8" Cowells and a 1/4" Champion drilling machine.

As IanT quotes, they write on page 479, " ...the 1/4" capacity Champion drilling machine, which has been widely used for many years past, ...." I assume that these machines must date at least from the 1920's onwards?

Back to my question - does anyone know where Champion (Machine Tools) had their factory?

Many thanks

Regards

Dennis

michael cole20/04/2012 10:05:17
165 forum posts

I have a nice one of these drills. I under stand it was home build from a set of castings.

Dennis WA20/04/2012 14:59:03
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79 forum posts
5 photos

Looking at the 1949 Vol100 ME they were advertised by tool merchants for Eight Pounds Five Shillings (presumably without motor)!

Terryd23/04/2012 10:23:28
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1936 forum posts
179 photos

Hi Michael,

are they the same Elliots who made the larger bench and pillar drilling machines?

Best regards

Terry

Dennis WA23/04/2012 12:55:41
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79 forum posts
5 photos

Hi Michael..

Thanks for your comprehensive answers!

Which ME contained the review of the model 3? (As indicated in an earlier post above, I have bound volumes from 1939 onwards)

Regards

Dennis

Dennis WA23/04/2012 20:28:23
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79 forum posts
5 photos

Hi Michael...

Thank you for the prompt response!

Regards

Dennis

Harold Hall 104/11/2012 21:13:47
418 forum posts
4 photos

IanT and Dennis both mention the Cowells drilling machine, have a look here for a photo of one I made, complete with the speed range modification. This was supplied as three castings with the major machining already done. However, as a teenager I could not afford them so asked if I could purchase the raw castings, completing the task on a Myford ML4.

Incidentally, Cowells still exist, and in the same premises in Watford as they did 61 years ago. Unfortunately, they no longer supply the casting kits that they did then, one of which was a very nice hand powered shaper, see here . Does anyone reading this still own one?

This is not the same company who presently make small lathes and milling machines.

Harold

Mark C04/11/2012 21:21:42
707 forum posts
1 photos

That is a coincedence! I have one of these that I "rescued" from the local recycling center - I had no idea it was a little brother to the two Elliot mills I have. I will take some pictures and upload them when I get a moment.

Mark

Gone Away05/11/2012 01:13:07
829 forum posts
1 photos

There are hand operated shaper castings available from Martin Model in the US (I'm in Canada so it's not quite the shipping problem it would be in the UK). I've considered something like this a few times but wonder how much physical effort is required. Does anyone have any direct experience in that regard?

Mark C05/11/2012 08:37:13
707 forum posts
1 photos

turns out mine is a number 2 - the motor is out of the arc, probably an old hoover washing machine or the like!

Markwp_000061.jpg

IanT05/11/2012 10:04:06
2002 forum posts
212 photos

Sid - wrt your question about hand shapers.

I have an Adept No 2 hand shaper - and it's not really the physical effort (I only take small cuts anyway) but more the time it takes - it gets a bit boring. So it is a device that in some ways is better used for smaller items where the area you are machining isn't that large - not because you can't machine larger stuff - but because it simply takes more time. Very small slots/ways are also possible with simple tooling that's easy to sharpen.

Having said that - if the mill is already set up for something else - then some jobs still get done on it and I can get a very fine finsh with very simple tools. I also intend to make some tooling for line engraving - both on dials and flat surfaces. Another use could be keyway slots in bores - I'd probably do this on the Adept shaper rather than make a dedicated slotting attachment - easier/quicker.

So in summary a very useful device to have - especially for smaller items where my larger mill would be a bit too large, or where setting up on the vertical slide might be a bit of a pain (or I've got other stuff already in progress). I think it could also be used in a variety of other ways (with a little thought) where a controlled linear cutting motion is required.

Regards,

Ian T

Gone Away05/11/2012 17:16:25
829 forum posts
1 photos

Thanks, Ian that's useful info. The shaper who's casting set I was referring to is necessarily limited to small jobs (4" stroke, 4" traverse). My main problem is that health related issues over the last few years have left me a bit down on muscle mass in my arms so a manual machine is a bit of a query.

Truth be told though, I'm more interested in the making of the machine than the using of it smiley

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