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Oil or Grease?

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EtheAv8r27/06/2011 13:02:29
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Should I use oil or grease to lubricate chuck jaws and scroll when cleaning/changing jaws?
Steve Garnett27/06/2011 13:40:38
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When I was wondering the same thing recently, I found that a lot of people recommended thin smears of Dow Corning G-N Metal Assembly paste in appropriate places. I've yet to purchase any, though. Does anybody have any idea where you can get it from?
 
The big snag with anything oily is that if you spin the chuck at a respectable rate, it goes everywhere. Conversely, anything too greasy retains swarf. So something like this assembly paste may well be a good compromise.
Spurry27/06/2011 14:39:15
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Pratt Burnerd, who have been known to make the odd chuck or two, do put their name on some grease specifically for the purpose.
 
Whether this grease is really special or just ordinary stuff in a posh tube, I have no idea.
 
I got some from Rotagrip to try.
 
Pete
KWIL27/06/2011 17:12:52
3478 forum posts
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I always use the Pratt Burnerd black stuff obtained from Rotagrip (The chuck people). It is a bit like Rocol moly, but more "sticky" so doea not fly off. Only a suggestion of grease is all that is required. Just make a habit of cleaning the jaw guides and scroll each time you change the jaws or after you have machined stock creating a lot of fine swarf (esp CI).
Gray6227/06/2011 19:30:35
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Whenever I clean my chucks, I use a fine brush and apply a very thin film of copper grease to all mating surfaces. I find that this does not fly off at high speed and also is thin enough not to attract significant build up of debris.
 
regards
 
Graeme
Steve Garnett27/06/2011 23:26:06
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The copper grease (Copaslip) seems like a good idea. Especially when you consider the price of the Rotagrip stuff. That tube it's in must be gold plated!
EtheAv8r28/06/2011 11:02:14
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Thanks chaps... Copaslip sounds good as I already have some!
blister28/06/2011 21:05:41
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Does anyone know if 'Copaslip' is the same as 'Kopa-Kote' in Australia
I use Kopa-Kote on everything I assemble including high temperature and in harsh environments.
Just wonderin'
Regards,
Phil
Stub Mandrel28/06/2011 21:31:33
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Sounds like it, Phil. You Aussies have curious names for everything, especially Sellotape!
 
Neil
Clive Hartland28/06/2011 21:43:01
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Phil, if its copper coloured then it must be!
 
Clive
Steve Garnett28/06/2011 21:50:57
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Posted by blister on 28/06/2011 21:05:41:
 
Does anyone know if 'Copaslip' is the same as 'Kopa-Kote' in Australia

 
Interesting. When I looked it up, it said that there was no such stuff! What it referred me to instead was 'Kopr-Kote'. But as far as I can tell, it's exactly the same stuff, yes.
 
The other product I found that would almost certainly be suitable, even though chucks aren't mentioned by name is Molyslip Liquid Grease. This is also reasonably cheap in small quantities, and you really wouldn't need too much of it for chucks.


Edited By Steve Garnett on 28/06/2011 22:04:20

blister28/06/2011 22:47:59
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Many thanks gentlemen for the response(s)
Neil
I think I know what you are referring to and it is rather odd what we normally call sellotape. It does though conjure up a vision that you just need to get rid of.
Steve,
Clearly it is time to get my eyes tested. You are right, it is Kopr- kote
I will see (after I get my eyes checked of course) if the Molyslip Liquid Grease is available locally.
Clive,
Bloody obvious really when you think about it.
thanks again
Regards,
Phil
blowlamp28/06/2011 23:59:23
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I wouldn't recommend Copper Grease for lubricating a chuck as it's really an anti-sieze compound for things like exhaust bolts and wheel nuts.
 
Surely just a clean to remove the chips, followed by the wipe of an oily rag should do to provide enough lube to keep it running smoothly?
 
 
Martin.
Steve Garnett29/06/2011 10:30:45
837 forum posts
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Posted by blowlamp on 28/06/2011 23:59:23:
 
I wouldn't recommend Copper Grease for lubricating a chuck as it's really an anti-sieze compound for things like exhaust bolts and wheel nuts.
 

 
In an ideal world that's true, of course. But copaslip is better than no lubrication at all, and having a bit of anti-seize around the scroll is almost certainly a good thing, especially if you are using coolant around the chuck. But, all things considered, I think that the Molyslip Liquid Grease would be better, because it's a grease that doesn't displace under high pressure - and that's the other thing you get at the contact points between the scroll and jaws - high pressure points and a displacing motion. 'Ordinary' oil, especially in small quantities, doesn't have the same properties at all and will displace quite readily.
 
And having done a bit more checking, it appears that at least in the UK, you can get this grease relatively cheaply. My take on this is that decent chucks are quite expensive, and if you can prolong the life (and inevitably accuracy) of one by using an appropriate lubricant on it without spending a fortune, then you should!

Edited By Steve Garnett on 29/06/2011 10:38:53

EtheAv8r29/06/2011 11:09:53
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Molyslip Liquid Grease sounds perfect - and I see MacKays in Cambridge stock it. I shall get some.
 
Thank you.
Andrew Johnston29/06/2011 11:28:07
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Posted by EtheAv8r on 29/06/2011 11:09:53:
MacKays in Cambridge
 
Blimey, there's a name from the past! It's years since I've been there. Last things I bought in Mackays were a quality 7/16" Whitworth spanner and some cheapo clamps at a pound a pop for DIY bodges. I also wanted some riffler files, but they didn't stock them.
 
Regards,
 
Andrew
blowlamp29/06/2011 11:31:50
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I don't think any grease should be used on the scroll or jaws because it will hold on to the swarf.
Perhaps one of these Teflon lubricants that spray on and evaporate would be OK though.
 
In my experience, Copper Grease dries out quite quickly to a leave a paste that just gums things up if used as a conventional grease. It is a good anti-sieze compound and that's what I use it for.
 
Martin.
EtheAv8r29/06/2011 12:53:12
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Posted by Andrew Johnston on 29/06/2011 11:28:07:
Posted by EtheAv8r on 29/06/2011 11:09:53:
MacKays in Cambridge
 
Blimey, there's a name from the past! It's years since I've been there. Last things I bought in Mackays were a quality 7/16" Whitworth spanner and some cheapo clamps at a pound a pop for DIY bodges. I also wanted some riffler files, but they didn't stock them.
 
Regards,
 
Andrew

And to think that you live so much closer to MacKays than I do!
 
Posted by blowlamp on 29/06/2011 11:31:50:
I don't think any grease should be used on the scroll or jaws because it will hold on to the swarf.
 

My Wabeco lathe has fresh, clean light coloured grease on the scroll - delivered as such from new, prepared and ready to go.



blowlamp29/06/2011 13:20:55
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1530 forum posts
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Posted by EtheAv8r on 29/06/2011 12:53:12:
Posted by blowlamp on 29/06/2011 11:31:50:
I don't think any grease should be used on the scroll or jaws because it will hold on to the swarf.
 

My Wabeco lathe has fresh, clean light coloured grease on the scroll - delivered as such from new, prepared and ready to go.



 
 
Well naturally it's your call, but if you bore say a brass bush in your chuck, you'll get a lot of swarf accumulating on the inside which will work its way towards the scroll. Once it's there it sticks to the grease and is carried around by the scroll when the job's released.
 
Could that grease be for corrosion protection during transport?
 
Martin.
Clive Hartland29/06/2011 14:03:01
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I have looked at my lubricant that I use and it is, ' G Rapid Plus', made by Molykote and distributed by Dow Corning.
It is described as an 'Assemblt paste' with anti sieze properties.
This is a Graphite paste and I use it sparingly applying with a cotton bud.
It dries out and adheres to the scroll and teeth of the jaws and so far nothing has stuck to it.
 
Clive

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