By continuing to use this site, you agree to our use of cookies. Find out more
Forum sponsored by:
Forum sponsored by Forum House Ad Zone

What's Next after CNC ----3D printing?

All Topics | Latest Posts

Search for:  in Thread Title in  
Paul Boscott17/05/2011 08:22:03
avatar
99 forum posts
21 photos

>>

How long before these become available to the home constructor?

I found this after seeing the "3D creation Lab" stand at The Harrogate show

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Jt3EGgtSAUc
John Stevenson17/05/2011 08:42:50
avatar
Moderator
5068 forum posts
3 photos
They are out now at home shop level, do a search for RepRap on Google or Youtube.
 
Like CNC, in fact you need CNC to operate them, they generate their own following as regards forums and blogs.
 
Again like CNC some of the users are more interested in these machines as a hobby, the MK I making the MK II etc, instead of what can actually be produced on them.
 
Many will look at these and discount them on the fact that they are slow and the materials used for the finished project are not suitable for use but there are trades where the materials can be used for a starter in other applications.
 
One example is lost wax casting where the part is so intricate or hollow that it cannot be machined by normal methods. I can see the jewellery industry taking these on board, the ability to do intricate jewellery in multiple copies.
 
John S.
blowlamp17/05/2011 08:54:33
avatar
1595 forum posts
102 photos
They're already avaiable here http://www.bitsfrombytes.com/ and I think some people are building their own by utilising defunct plotters and printers etc.
 
Some 'printed' parts are shown here too  http://moi3d.com/forum/messages.php?webtag=MOI&msg=4048.1
 
 
It won't be long before they become relatively commonplace, in my opinion.
 
 
Martin.

Edited By blowlamp on 17/05/2011 08:56:12

Edited By blowlamp on 17/05/2011 09:01:08

ronald smack10/08/2011 10:12:16
1 forum posts
Nice video! I do not know much about this, but i think it deserves some attention. The details are really helpful. Thanks for sharing the valuable information.
 
ady10/08/2011 10:50:44
612 forum posts
50 photos
Most of these things show people smiling while they lean against something which looks like a coffee machine.
 
Here's one that shows the basic processes.
 
 
What this reminds me of is the replicator in Star Trek.
John McNamara10/08/2011 13:16:19
avatar
1336 forum posts
125 photos
Hi All

This is the way of the future and it won’t be long before a home builder completes one. More difficult than hot melted plastic yes but not impossible. A 200 watt laser is enough. (And enough to blind you so safety interlocks and procedures are essential). Unlike the plastic parts fron say Rep Rap machines these parts have properties similar to the parent metal. Metal powders are not that expensive. particularly when you consider there is no waste.
 
Sintered metal the old way (Metal powder with or without a ceramic binder pressed under extreme pressure in a die then fused in a furnace) has been around for years. A typical car has hundreds of parts made from it.
 

Edited By John McNamara on 10/08/2011 13:37:14

John Stevenson10/08/2011 13:46:33
avatar
Moderator
5068 forum posts
3 photos
Art Fenerty who wrote the Mach 3 CNC program is working on a simple version using a pretty standard printer which has been altered.
 
As others have said it's not that new but someone like Art will put a lot into an effort like this.
He has a very good track record, Mach3 and then Gearotic.
 
John S.
Silverback10/08/2011 16:36:57
avatar
1 forum posts
First posting on the forum!
 
On a commercial basis this technology is being explored as a serious alternative to thermoplastic injection moulding for short run (<1,000 parts) and designs previously not feasible with current mould toolmaking technology.
 
GC
 
 
JasonB10/08/2011 16:48:22
avatar
Moderator
22584 forum posts
2637 photos
1 articles
Posted by Paul Boscott on 17/05/2011 08:22:03:

>>

How long before these become available to the home constructor?

 
Well the Guy that runs another model steam forum is expecting delivery of his any day now. He's also part way through drawing up a 3 ft high bottle engien and will use the CAD drawings to make patterns to cast the parts from.
 
He hopes at a later dat to market the engien in various scales, the beuty of the system is that with a click of a button the patterns can be made whatever size within reason someone wants.
 
Jason
Jim Nolan10/08/2011 19:42:57
avatar
77 forum posts

The Achilles heel of all these entry level systems is resolution. The demo stuff on show at Harrogate was probably OK if you wanted a sand cast type finish. But it would not hold a candle to the best lost wax or investment casting.


Most of the stuff I saw at Harrogate I think was using Z corp. machines which are probably the cheapest method out there for commercial rapid prototyping. Which give an acceptable resolution and finish. They are also probably the cheapest commercial type machine for a start up business. When you get into high resolution prototyping the cost rise dramatically but so dose the quality.


The home based machines while exciting and a step in the right direction have a long way to go before we get to the point where home paper printers are now compared to there commercial cousins.


But roll on the day it will save me a fortune

 

Jim
Gone Away11/08/2011 01:34:31
829 forum posts
1 photos
Posted by John Stevenson on 17/05/2011 08:42:50:
They are out now at home shop level, do a search for RepRap on Google or Youtube.

 
Many will look at these and discount them on the fact that they are slow and the materials used for the finished project are not suitable for use but there are trades where the materials can be used for a starter in other applications.

 
These (Repraps) are not like the early STL printers, John. The materials used for printing parts on those certainly were good for space models but not much else. Usually much too weak/brittle (also expensive)
 
But the current generation of Reprap machines uses ABS as a printing material which certainly is useful in many practical applications. In fact the plastic parts for a Reprap are usually made on another Reprap. Once you get hold of a set of those parts (eBay) the rest of it is pretty simple stuff ... threaded rod and nuts, toothed belts, small stepper motors etc. (although getting small quantities of PTFE rod and PEEK is and high temp thermistors is not without its problems - at least in my neck of the woods).
 
I'm in the final stages of building one - just doing the extruder which is the tricky bit.

Edited By Sid Herbage on 11/08/2011 01:34:51

Edited By Sid Herbage on 11/08/2011 01:35:21

Redpiperbob11/08/2011 06:45:00
avatar
92 forum posts
41 photos
Hi All
Here is a picture of the Pruasa 3D printer that I am building I am at the stage of getting the flow rate correct.
Bob

Gone Away11/08/2011 14:22:37
829 forum posts
1 photos
Prusa is the one I'm building. It's just the (Wade's) extruder that I need to finish up. The nozzle is done (with its 0.5mm hole!) I now have the piece of PEEK which I need to machine. The PTFE rod is still on order though.
 
I'm in Canada and haven't managed to source the specified Thermistor. RS in the UK has it but the shipping is prohibitive. I'd like to buy a few in case I want to experiment with extruders. I have found an axial version which I think I can use .... I'd just drill the Thermistor hole all the way through the heater block and bring the leads out both sides.
 
What are you using for electronics?
 
Since you're farther ahead than me, I might take the liberty of contacting you by PM if I need advice if that's OK with you?
John Stevenson11/08/2011 16:13:03
avatar
Moderator
5068 forum posts
3 photos
 
 
 
 
Sid, Whats the RS part number ?
 
Reason I ask is i bought some a while ago for a heated platten on a printing machine and I reckon there are still some left?

Edited By John Stevenson on 11/08/2011 16:14:34

David Clark 111/08/2011 18:12:39
avatar
3357 forum posts
112 photos
10 articles
The last post appears corrupted.
Try this.
regards David

Edited By David Clark 1 on 11/08/2011 18:13:36

Gone Away11/08/2011 18:21:36
829 forum posts
1 photos
Posted by John Stevenson on 11/08/2011 16:13:03:

 
Sid, Whats the RS part number ?
 

484-0183 seems to be the one that best fits the particular design I'm working to.
 
(hey - I managed to answer that all on my own!)
David Clark 111/08/2011 18:40:50
avatar
3357 forum posts
112 photos
10 articles
Hi Sid
No need to make comments.
Stick to the point.
regards David
Gone Away11/08/2011 20:07:32
829 forum posts
1 photos
Hi David C,
 
The (very mild compared with much on these forums that goes unmoderated) comment wasn't aimed at you, but at the person who, against all accepted forum etiquette (and in-person discussion if it comes to that), pre-empted me on a question that was asked specifically and solely of me.
 
That is normally considered rude, boorish and often smacks of hubris.
 
I cannot believe that you jumped on this in this fashion.
 
 

David Clark 111/08/2011 20:14:45
avatar
3357 forum posts
112 photos
10 articles
Hi Sid
I know who it was aimed at but that is imaterial. All comments that I spot like that will be edited out and repeat offences will result in a period of suspension.
Also, in future, when threads get hijacked just so people can have a bit of fun, that thread will change to a moderated thread.
I am getting to many complaints from people.
The only way to stop them is to stamp on them all equally.
regards David
 
John Stevenson11/08/2011 21:13:56
avatar
Moderator
5068 forum posts
3 photos
Sid, check your messages, top left.
 
John S.

All Topics | Latest Posts

Please login to post a reply.

Magazine Locator

Want the latest issue of Model Engineer or Model Engineers' Workshop? Use our magazine locator links to find your nearest stockist!

Find Model Engineer & Model Engineers' Workshop

Latest Forum Posts
Support Our Partners
Eccentric July 5 2018
Eccentric Engineering
Dreweatts
Rapid RC
cowells
Subscription Offer

Latest "For Sale" Ads
Latest "Wanted" Ads
Get In Touch!

Do you want to contact the Model Engineer and Model Engineers' Workshop team?

You can contact us by phone, mail or email about the magazines including becoming a contributor, submitting reader's letters or making queries about articles. You can also get in touch about this website, advertising or other general issues.

Click THIS LINK for full contact details.

For subscription issues please see THIS LINK.

Digital Back Issues

Social Media online

'Like' us on Facebook
Follow us on Facebook

Follow us on Twitter
 Twitter Logo

Pin us on Pinterest