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martin perman03/07/2018 19:36:21
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David,

Should have been clearer, my mum lives in Chedburgh, I live in Bedfordshire.

A few minutes, that must be Chevington.

Edited By martin perman on 03/07/2018 19:37:45

Andrew Johnston03/07/2018 20:35:54
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4085 forum posts
502 photos
Posted by DrDave on 03/07/2018 09:35:43:

OV-10 Bronco? It is a twin-boom aeroplane that is commonly used for air-to-air photography.

I recall making an Airfix kit of a Bronco "ahem" years ago, but sadly not the aircarft in question. The aircraft was twin rudder, not twin boom. The horizontal stabilisers on the tail had a significant dihedral, so quite distinctive. But I still don't know what it was. sad

Andrew

David Standing 103/07/2018 20:39:52
1075 forum posts
41 photos
Posted by martin perman on 03/07/2018 19:36:21:

David,

Should have been clearer, my mum lives in Chedburgh, I live in Bedfordshire.

A few minutes, that must be Chevington.

Edited By martin perman on 03/07/2018 19:37:45

Martin

You were entirely clear, I understood that.

A bit further than that, I have a quick car wink

I'm in the middle of nowhere, near Stoke by Clare smiley

martin perman03/07/2018 20:45:29
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1273 forum posts
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I know the area well, I was brought up in Bury St Edmunds, married then lived and worked in Sudbury.

Martin P

Andrew Johnston03/07/2018 20:48:58
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4085 forum posts
502 photos
Posted by Adam Mara on 03/07/2018 18:50:49:

They have been practicing the flypast at RAF Cranwell today, lot of activity today in Lincolnshire!

Not just Lincolnshire but a large chunk of East Anglia as well. From just east of Newmarket to the coast and including a huge area of the North Sea. The area is split into five, with varying maximum heights from 3000ft to FL175. Since the lower heights are over land and the highest over the sea I'd assume the low limits are for getting to the formation and the actual formation practise is done over the sea. Timings vary but the airspace is closed from late morning to early afternoon every day this week. Unless they get it right, in which case the NOTAM will be cancelled.

I know all this because our club safety officer pointed it out on Sunday and since I was planning to fly the glider today I printed it all out. I say planning, because when I got the to the club there was no ***king tug pilot available. And since I could think of no way of flying the tug and glider at the same time I was stuffed. It's enough to turn one into a grumpy old git.

Still at least I salvaged something from the day as I've drilled and cleaned up all the rivet holes in the rear strakes for the traction engine wheels. Took less than 30 seconds per strake on the CNC mill.

Andrew

V8Eng03/07/2018 22:38:59
1167 forum posts
20 photos

Next weeks flypast has just featured on BBC News, the Reporter went up in one of the 22 Typhoons practising over the North Sea.

Seems that Cranwell was standing in for Buckingham Palace! they also showed several Helicopters in flight.

Edited By V8Eng on 03/07/2018 22:39:21

davidk04/07/2018 07:07:33
44 forum posts
Posted by Andrew Johnston on 03/07/2018 20:35:54:
Posted by DrDave on 03/07/2018 09:35:43:

OV-10 Bronco? It is a twin-boom aeroplane that is commonly used for air-to-air photography.

I recall making an Airfix kit of a Bronco "ahem" years ago, but sadly not the aircarft in question. The aircraft was twin rudder, not twin boom. The horizontal stabilisers on the tail had a significant dihedral, so quite distinctive. But I still don't know what it was. sad

Andrew

Sounds a bit like a Dassault Flamant.

David

Ian S C04/07/2018 12:17:10
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7015 forum posts
224 photos

Andrew, the chase plane more than likely a Beech 18, or one of the Lockheed twins like a Lodestar, Hudson, Lockheed 10, 14, or similar.

Ian S C

Muzzer06/07/2018 20:58:22
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2874 forum posts
441 photos

This evening the Battle of Britain Memorial Flight visited our locality. Southport is spitting distance away, so as I arrived home this evening at 8pm, the Red Arrows did their thing, followed by various Spitfire, Hurricane and Lancaster events.

img_7304.jpg

I'm guessing this is the Hurricane? Hard to tell from this but from what I recall it has a longer thinner nose than the Spitfire.

img_7305.jpg

Murray

Andrew Johnston06/07/2018 22:24:33
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4085 forum posts
502 photos

Yep, definitely a Hurricane. Quite a "kink" in the fuselage behind the cockpit and a larger, more rounded, fin and rudder. The wings aren't elliptical either.

Andrew

Farmboy07/07/2018 09:36:41
82 forum posts
7 photos

According to Encyclopaedia Britannica the Hurricane had a 12 cylinder in-line engine.

Guess it had a longer nose than the Spitfire . . . wink 2

Andrew Johnston07/07/2018 10:15:23
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4085 forum posts
502 photos
Posted by Farmboy on 07/07/2018 09:36:41:

According to Encyclopaedia Britannica the Hurricane had a 12 cylinder in-line engine.

Guess it had a longer nose than the Spitfire . . . wink 2

A 12 cylinder inline engine would be interesting - just think of the torque wind up in the crankshaft!

The Hurricane was always fitted with a 12 cylinder V engine, the Merlin; same as a Spitfire. So if you look at the nose of a Hurricane and an early Spitfire the noses are very similar.

Andrew

Clive Hartland07/07/2018 11:52:41
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2333 forum posts
38 photos

Nah, it's always been a secret, it was powered by elastic bands made by Rolls Royce!

Neil Wyatt07/07/2018 22:50:22
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14418 forum posts
611 photos
70 articles
Posted by Farmboy on 07/07/2018 09:36:41:

According to Encyclopaedia Britannica the Hurricane had a 12 cylinder in-line engine.

Guess it had a longer nose than the Spitfire . . . wink 2

Several years ago an academic did a random 'fact test' of EB and Wikipedia, they both came out as equally reliable...

Sam Stones07/07/2018 23:16:40
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548 forum posts
182 photos

Same source of material, perhaps Neil?

devil

Neil Wyatt08/07/2018 00:48:35
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14418 forum posts
611 photos
70 articles
Posted by Sam Stones on 07/07/2018 23:16:40:

Same source of material, perhaps Neil?

devil

Different errors... same error rate.

I suspect Wikipedia is both vastly bigger and vastly more accurate these days.

John Olsen08/07/2018 23:48:26
904 forum posts
86 photos
1 articles

There were straight 8 engines built for cars, and they did indeed have trouble with torsion effects in the crankshaft. I shudder to think how a straight 12 would behave, especially one with the power of a Merlin.

Locally, someone has fitted a Ford Lincoln Mercury V12 engine into a tractor. (That's Edsel Fords stretched version of the classic flathead V8)

John

duncan webster08/07/2018 23:53:52
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1667 forum posts
13 photos

so how about a vee 20, not much use in an aeroplane I suspect

**LINK**

Hopper09/07/2018 06:49:43
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2904 forum posts
48 photos

A very interesting article here **LINK**on a mission by B2 stealth bombers -- to fly halfway 'round the world to drop 500lb bombs on a camp of 70 ISIS guys in the Libyan desert. Talk about overkill, literally. But gives an interesting insight into the life of a modern-day military pilot. 'Taint what it used to be, that's for sure.

And talk about maintenance! 100 hours of it required for every one hour in the air. So after this one 33-hour mission, each plane would have required 3,300 hours of maintenance work. That's job security that is. Interestingly, the engines in these super duper high-tech planes are an upgraded 707 engine. (Of course, they don't say what those upgrades are!)

Ian S C10/07/2018 14:25:37
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7015 forum posts
224 photos

I see that the USAF have solved the maintenance problem with both the B-1, and B-2 bombers, they have been withdrawn from service, their roll taken over by the B-52, and a new aircraft (all hush hush) B-21. The B-52 will be pushing 90 plus years when it is due for retirement.

Ian S C

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