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This is where all the off topic discussion about aeroplanes should go

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Geoff Sheppard05/02/2011 16:27:33
80 forum posts
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KWIL
 
Now you jog my memory, I believe that it was WD952 - thanks.
 
The Canberra was chosen because it was the best available airframe in which the Olympus could be housed. Even so, full power could not be developed in flight because the holes in the main spar through which the jet pipes had to pass could not be enlarged. The constricted throat limited the thrust to about 82%.
 
The first height record attempt was made on 4th May 1953, when 63,668 ft. was achieved, breaking Group Captain John Cunningham's record in a de H Vampire by over 4200 ft. The second attempt - the one when I was in the Flight Shed - was with the more powerful Mk 102 engines on 29th August 1955, when 65,889 ft. was reached.
 
All this has brought one incident vividly to mind. We had removed the bomb doors so that lightened panels could be fitted and I was stood with my head in the bomb bay, removing pumps or something similar. I was working with a fitter, quite short in stature, rather bald but with a monk-like tonsure. He suddenly disappeared in a deluge of liquid falling from above. We had unlaced a flexible bag fuel tank located in the space above the bay and two other fitters, working in the dark were rolling it forward with their shoulders so that it could be removed via a hatch further forward. What we had forgotten was that there was 'undrainable' fuel lying in the tank, which promptly came out of a pump location. Although he was in some discomfort, he was a comical sight, but we suppressed any laughter. Into the shower with him, find him some spare overalls and the shop manager ferried him home and gave him the rest of the day off!
 
Only a few months after this I finished my tour of the works departments and transferred to a staff post, working as a very, very, very junior Development Engineer on Olympus engines for the Vulcan! Had to go to the Flight Shed quite frequently and chatted to the unfortunate fitter who, by now could see the funnier side of things but still blamed his mates 'up top' for not giving him a warning.
 
Happy days.
Nobby05/02/2011 17:03:12
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587 forum posts
113 photos
Hi Niloch
You were right I dont think he is a Hermit I spoke to him when he was checking the progress on the work down at Calshot
Regards Nobby
 
Ian S C07/03/2011 07:49:54
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7468 forum posts
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The RNZAF got 16 reconditioned Mk 5 Sunderlands in 1952/3, and used them un til1967 when they were replaced by P-3 Orions. According to one of the aircrew that flew them out to NZ, the reconditioning involved a coat of paint, at least one aircraft had to be beached in Africa some where because of a leaking hull.They were passed off as "good as new", but they served well. Ian S C
V8Eng04/04/2011 16:39:59
1560 forum posts
31 photos
 
Do not forget about the last flying Vulcan Bomber.
Please go to the website for news on it.
 
 



Edited By V8Eng on 04/04/2011 16:52:33

Les Jones 104/04/2011 18:09:42
2225 forum posts
153 photos
Hi V8Eng,
I have corrected your link. You had the correct URL in the title field but
the URL field only contained http:///
 
 
Les.
V8Eng04/04/2011 19:24:35
1560 forum posts
31 photos
Hi Les.
 
OOPS!

Thanks, I usually get links right, must be having an off day.
Ian S C11/04/2011 15:43:15
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Quite a bit of interesting stuff on the M-52 on google. While I was looking, I came across a discusion group (RNZAF I think), how many beer kegs can you get in the pressure cabin of a Vulcan? Did'nt see an answer.
Gray, the boat thatBill Hamilton used in 1960to go up the Grand Canyon had a 3 stage unit, I don't know what engine they had. The jet units they build in Christchurch today are a far cry from the ones back in the 60s. Ian S C
Ian S C12/04/2011 10:07:04
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7468 forum posts
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Gray, the NZ built unit proberbly had an American or Austrailian V8. ian S C
John Olsen12/04/2011 10:31:08
1156 forum posts
92 photos
1 articles
I'm amazed that a Consul engine could even turn one stage. (ex Consul owner....)
 
Of course boats, other than flying boats, are actually off topic in this thread.....
 
regards
John
Ian S C12/04/2011 13:05:43
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230 photos
C W F Hamilton's first boat, a 12 footer with a Ford 100E, I'v been looking for info on the Grand canyon boats. The motor used on a lot of the early units was the Ford Zephyr. Better quit on this one, perhaps it could be an interesting subject for model boats. Ian S C    ps Saw reference to a 3 stage Dowty 1959!!

Edited By Ian S C on 12/04/2011 13:08:09

John Olsen12/04/2011 19:56:42
1156 forum posts
92 photos
1 articles
Not to worry Graham, my tongue was actually in my cheek, although I guess you could not see that!
 
(I think people worry too much about the odd bit of topic drift, it is a conversation after all...)
 
regards
John
Ian S C09/04/2012 14:01:52
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7468 forum posts
230 photos

Here we go again, airshow time, IK did,nt get tio War Birds over Wanaka this Easter, but if anyone is in the Canterbury (NZ)area on the 22nd April, we are having our own Air Show at the local airstrip, just east of Darfield, it won't be near as big as the Easter one, it included the 75th anniversary of the RNZAF.

If there's anything interesting, I'll post a photo in my album. Ian S C

DerryUK09/04/2012 21:10:09
125 forum posts

I recently wen to RAF Cosford to view the Bristol 188. I want to build a simulation of it in my X-Plane 10 flight sim. First thought as I arrived was blummin cheek, they charge for parking. Anyway I paid my 80p and breezed into the entrance. “One concession please” I said to the young lady on the desk. “It’s free for you Sir”, crickey I thought that’s a good deal and then she added, “but it’s free for everybody.”

I used to look after a DC3 and one time we were coming into land to clear customs at Manston after a trip to Germany. I was sat towards the rear and looking at the runway through a passenger window, I could just make out the edge of the runway. A red flare went off! My heart-beat went up a bit as I wondered what was wrong with our aircraft!

The pilot abandoned the landing and opened up the engines for a go-around but needless to say we landed OK. When the pilot walked down from the cockpit he told us that the airman at the end of the runway had never seen a Dakota before and when he could only see the main wheels he thought the nose wheel was still locked up so fired his flare. Of course he soon spotted the tail wheel as we flew past him!

That aircraft is now with the RAF and is the subject of the Haynes Dakota manual.

Derry.

Stub Mandrel09/04/2012 21:25:33
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Wow! Was it really a year ago that this thread went to sleep?

We wnet for a family walk on Saturday, and our near Wychnor there was a light plane up. He seemed to be pulling up steeply andteh engine working hard and he surprised me by pulling a loop! It didn't look very aerobatic, but he proceeded to do at least a few rolls and an immelman turn - one 'stunt' per pass over the area of open fields where we were.

Neil

Ian S C10/04/2012 13:59:03
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7468 forum posts
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Have not heard yet, but Air New Zealands new Boing 777 visited the show at Easter, and supposidly was to do some aerobatics. The biggest we'll get at our show will be the DC-3, no aerobatics, but pleanty of passenger rides, I think last time it was $NZ80 for 20 min or so, also rides in a Harvard, or a Mustang (rear seat where the fuel tank used to be in the rear of the cockpit),the photo of the Mustang in my album has as a passenger a local pvt pilot having his 80th birthday present at 400mph, think the whole flight cost over $NZ 1000, including a full aerobatic sesion. He usually flys a Piper PA-18 150. All the cash goes to fund the volunteer firebrigade, and ambulance. Ian S C

Ian S C28/04/2012 14:47:53
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7468 forum posts
230 photos

The aishow was a great day out, nothing special this year except one model jet that put on a good aerobatic display at speeds in excess of 200kph.

Later in the year at Ardmore(near Auckland) the first flight of a rebuilt Mosquito is due. The company doing the rebuild is also doing one to go to the UK.

I see that the Spitfires in Burma have been found, and are to be returned to UK, they were buryed in a 40ft deep hole. Ian S C

Clive Hartland28/04/2012 15:39:18
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2661 forum posts
40 photos

I remember reading somewhere that the glue used on the Mosquito was a form of Epoxy resin (Araldite)

It is possible to get Epoxy resins that do not go hard/brittle. These are used on glass components that sit in metal holders, prisms in mounts and glass windows in bodies.

Another form is used in boat building so that the wood can flex, this from an Americam Boat Building magazine.

So it would seem that Epoxy resin would be the answer.

Clive

Geoff Sheppard28/04/2012 16:18:09
80 forum posts
1 photos

Back to the topic of Avro Vulcans.

For many years now, my local model engineering society has organised a late summer holiday (usually a week-long coach trip) and we have ventured all over the UK and Europe. Last year we were based near York and did all the local attractions, particularly the North York Moors Railway and the National Railway Museum. We also went to the Yorkshire Air Museum at Elvington.

As our coach driver checked in, the volunteers on the gate said that we may be in for a special treat as the preserved Vulcan was due to over-fly, en route to Scotland. Sure enough, at about mid-day, she appeared and gave us a quarter-hour aerobatic (for a Vulcan!) display. Magnificent.

At least four of us in the party had worked at Patchway, so there were lumps in throats. Even my wife, who has never been a raving aircraft enthusiast, admitted that she could now understand our fascination. Quite a day.

Can thoroughly recommend a visit to Elvington.

Geoff

Ian Abbott28/04/2012 16:36:05
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279 forum posts
21 photos

I thought that the original Mosquitos were built using somethink like urea-formaldahyde. They did change it to a different spec for the tropics. I used to work with someone who was with the RAF in India, he said that they just fell apart in the humidity.

Ian

Stub Mandrel28/04/2012 16:59:46
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4311 forum posts
291 photos
1 articles

Did the Vulcan roll? Something that big inverted is a helluva sight!

Neil

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