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Anyone an expert in kitchen knives

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Ian Parkin02/07/2022 16:44:27
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1035 forum posts
243 photos

My mums had this knife for as long as she can remember

d9e0eece-501d-45a0-812e-54464cd5868f.jpeg

f4010180-f948-447c-96de-8c0ff32e1d34.jpeg

It’s got a simple round wooden handle all together its 10 inches long

the steel is impossibly thin at the edge……at the handle end its 60 thou at the top

the end and edge is only 2-3thou but it cuts brilliantly

can anyone shed any light on its makers..what its made of…etc?

Edited By Ian Parkin on 02/07/2022 16:46:07

Tony Pratt 102/07/2022 17:20:57
2028 forum posts
12 photos

Blade is likely carbon steel which holds an edge better than Stainless steel but obviously corrodes as for the maker some one in Sheffield?

Tony

Ian Parkin02/07/2022 17:30:10
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Tony

i’m assuming it was made in sheffield as its been here for 70 years or so

Frances IoM02/07/2022 17:31:52
1283 forum posts
28 photos
Carbon Steel was used in all Chef's knives pre abt 1990 (I still have such a set of Sabatier knives) - they take an excellent edge (try the old demo of slicing a tomato thrown up in the air) but they corrode and will stain some foods - modern hygiene regs saw them replaced with stainless steel that don't hold an edge in the same way.
Howard Lewis02/07/2022 17:32:22
6314 forum posts
15 photos

The usual method of sharpening was to use a stone to grind the cutting edge (Nowadays, we would probably use a few strokes of a diamond hone, )

From the curve in the carbon steel blade, it has been sharpened many many times, but not uniformly along the length of the blade.

It might well be about a hundred years old. My granny used knives like that!

Howard

Martin King 202/07/2022 17:38:43
1018 forum posts
461 photos

Ian, Any marks or logo stamps anywhere on it? They can be VERY faint but show up in a raking light.

Martin

SillyOldDuffer02/07/2022 17:40:44
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8903 forum posts
1999 photos

Looks like an old knife, so high carbon steel. I guess it started as a standard kitchen knife and has been resharpened so often that the original shape has been lost and it's thinned down remarkably.

Being pedantic about Tony's comment: although carbon steel takes an edge better than stainless, stainless holds an edge better than carbon steel because it's tougher and harder. Whilst Carbon steel can be made wonderfully sharp it needs frequent grinding and stropping to keep it that way. And as Tony says, knives made of it corrode easily and had to be repolished frequently as well. They don't last forever.

Dave

Ian Parkin02/07/2022 17:41:17
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1035 forum posts
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I think this one was probably sharpened on my grandparents door step

Nick Clarke 302/07/2022 18:13:45
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1475 forum posts
64 photos

The underside of some plates - the unglazed rim - makes a good home for a carbon steel knife if nothing else is available

Ian Parkin02/07/2022 18:28:25
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1035 forum posts
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Another picture as i said the top near the handle is 60 thou but very quickly thins to less than 10th of and at the edge all along its 2-3thou

would it have been made like this?

many years ago someone said a knife like this was special as it has a funny area near the handle end visible in the 2nd photo above..something about how it made..

its really like a 3 thou length of feeler gauge with a thicker back7b88df64-8009-407e-adf6-5fd3ce6ab775.jpeg

Ian Parkin02/07/2022 18:28:57
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1035 forum posts
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There’s no makers marks or logos visible at all

Frances IoM02/07/2022 18:41:37
1283 forum posts
28 photos
The best (+ sharpest) tools were composite with I think the high carbon inner sandwiched between two lower carbon strengthening layers - weren't Japanese woodworking tools built this way as well as their famous Samurai swords
V8Eng02/07/2022 19:24:35
1730 forum posts
6 photos

Likely a well used carbon steel carving knife originally supplied as a set of three implements ie. the knife, two pronged fork and a honing steel to keep it sharp.

A good quality carving knife is still a delight to use we have one and a honing steel (when the wife comes in I’ll ask her where it is)

Many very fine ones originated in Sheffield from the 1900s.

Edited By V8Eng on 02/07/2022 19:34:36

Dave Halford02/07/2022 19:25:57
2096 forum posts
23 photos
Posted by Ian Parkin on 02/07/2022 18:28:25:

Another picture as i said the top near the handle is 60 thou but very quickly thins to less than 10th of and at the edge all along its 2-3thou

would it have been made like this?

many years ago someone said a knife like this was special as it has a funny area near the handle end visible in the 2nd photo above..something about how it made..

its really like a 3 thou length of feeler gauge with a thicker back7b88df64-8009-407e-adf6-5fd3ce6ab775.jpeg

Year of sharpening on the back doorstep will do that

V8Eng02/07/2022 20:15:23
1730 forum posts
6 photos

Here is our vey old one and the blade is about 220mm long (middle photo is the sharp side) no makers mark either.

Not been able to afford a joint big enough to use it on for years!

b8c5508b-7a7d-4cb9-ab0e-a8fad05131c3.jpegc29192f1-ee6c-4de5-9b65-e11db20f9e5b.jpege8abd956-2467-401c-9591-f949197db14e.jpeg

Edited By V8Eng on 02/07/2022 20:16:42

Michael Gilligan02/07/2022 22:35:31
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20289 forum posts
1064 photos

I believe, with a blade so thin, it would be called a ‘Ham Knife’

MichaelG.

.

https://www.houseofknives.uk/blogs/news/what-you-should-know-about-ham-knives

Edited By Michael Gilligan on 02/07/2022 22:40:41

peak402/07/2022 22:48:29
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1787 forum posts
193 photos

You could try sending a photo to the folk at The Hawley Collection and see if anyone recognises the pattern, as its quite distinctive.
https://www.hawleytoolcollection.com/ 
It would be good if it turned out to be one of the Parkin manufacturers
https://www.hawleysheffieldknives.com/index.php?val=p&kel=1322

Bill

Edited By peak4 on 02/07/2022 22:49:09

Edited By peak4 on 02/07/2022 22:51:17

Ian Parkin03/07/2022 14:04:56
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1035 forum posts
243 photos

V8 eng

your knife has that funny puddle type of area near the tang area

any idea what it is?

Nick Clarke 303/07/2022 14:18:09
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1475 forum posts
64 photos
Posted by V8Eng on 02/07/2022 19:24:35:

Likely a well used carbon steel carving knife originally supplied as a set of three implements ie. the knife, two pronged fork and a honing steel to keep it sharp.

A good quality carving knife is still a delight to use we have one and a honing steel (when the wife comes in I’ll ask her where it is)

Many very fine ones originated in Sheffield from the 1900s.

Edited By V8Eng on 02/07/2022 19:34:36

When father carved a joint or a chicken he always started with honing the knife on a steel. He was a very good carver and when I asked he said it was probably because although a GP he had originally trained to be a surgeon.

He then added that his father had been a lot better than he was. Only later did I remember my grandfather was a pathologist, which made me think a bit!

Harry Wilkes03/07/2022 14:45:13
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1371 forum posts
66 photos

Strangely just returned one of our knives to the knife draw and at the time I look at the markings it was stamped Made in England smiley we were give this knife in a set for a wedding present in 1966 and still going strong

H

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