By continuing to use this site, you agree to our use of cookies. Find out more
Forum sponsored by:
Forum sponsored by Forum House Ad Zone

For all you Myford owners

A tour of the factory

All Topics | Latest Posts

Search for:  in Thread Title in  
Steviegtr28/06/2022 17:12:13
avatar
2460 forum posts
341 photos
Posted by Harry Wilkes on 28/06/2022 16:21:25:

Sorry Steve wgen you say " Keith is a acomplished engineer " I don't agree he use's some very crude methods and doesn't appear to be able to use a micrometer, does he know about model steam engines very much.

H

OO nasty. I have only seen odd youtube video's of him doing repair work on STEAM engines. Anyway i am not the person to crib anyone elses work. As i am only a Hammer chewer myself.

Stevesad

Mark Rand28/06/2022 18:08:39
1314 forum posts
38 photos

On the comments about the poor perception of flat ways compared with prismatic ways, I'd suggest that the 80 tonne capacity flat bed Waldrich Seigen at work was a far better machine than the two prismatic way Ravensbergs. laugh

It was a bit bigger as well,

V-flat and prismatic bed lathes are poorly suited for milling, which was a major capability for the 7 series.

Neil Wyatt28/06/2022 18:42:15
avatar
Moderator
19079 forum posts
736 photos
80 articles
Posted by noel shelley on 28/06/2022 09:50:14:

Make NO MISTAKE gentlemen, Myford Beeston DID NOT make all the items they sold ! Some for the sake of argument were made in the west country ! The castings were supplied, taken to a small workshop in Devon, manufactured and delivered to Beeston whilst at the same time the next batch of castings were collected. They had an identifying W stamped in them ! This is a fact ! Noel.

The Myford VMB (mill) and Mystro MK2 (a wood lathe) were made in Taiwan.

Neil

Tony Pratt 128/06/2022 19:56:15
2028 forum posts
12 photos

Myford VME [also VMC & VMF?] also made in Taiwan but fitted with UK electrical parts in Nottingham.

Tony

Michael Gilligan28/06/2022 20:17:02
avatar
20289 forum posts
1064 photos
Posted by Neil Wyatt on 28/06/2022 18:42:15:
Posted by noel shelley on 28/06/2022 09:50:14:

Make NO MISTAKE gentlemen, Myford Beeston DID NOT make all the items they sold ! …

The Myford VMB (mill) and Mystro MK2 (a wood lathe) were made in Taiwan.

Neil

.

Also the 6” Rotary Table was made by Vertex and, in my opinion, a little better made than the versions they made for general sale [or perhaps I was just lucky]

MichaelG.

Hopper29/06/2022 04:09:08
avatar
6694 forum posts
347 photos

Keith Appleton has now updated this Myford "factory" video playlist as "THE OFFICIAL MYFORD SERIES". LINK

Seems that if they are official from Myford, they are paid promotional pieces, as they first appeared to be. Bit remiss of him not to mention it up front.

 

Edited By Hopper on 29/06/2022 04:38:08

Michael Gilligan29/06/2022 06:06:19
avatar
20289 forum posts
1064 photos

What a tangled web we weave …

**LINK**

https://www.youtube.com/c/keithappleton

MichaelG.

Hollowpoint29/06/2022 08:12:54
476 forum posts
59 photos

There doesn't seem to be much machining going on. Hell there doesn't seem to be any machines other than a couple of drills. 🙄

Michael Gilligan29/06/2022 09:54:20
avatar
20289 forum posts
1064 photos
Posted by Hollowpoint on 29/06/2022 08:12:54:

There doesn't seem to be much machining going on. Hell there doesn't seem to be any machines other than a couple of drills. 🙄

.

I have tried, and thus-far failed, to find any clear definition of what constitutes ‘made’

This is the nearest I have found: **LINK**

https://www.sirgordonbennett.com/gordons-bugle/made-in-britain-definition/

dont know … an opinion from the ‘Man on the Clapham Omnibus’ is what we need

MichaelG.

Alan Jackson29/06/2022 10:12:06
avatar
260 forum posts
146 photos

One of the reasons for designing and building the Stepperhead lathe was to try to show how outdated the Myford style lathes are. They were designed on the 1940s with a slow speed, plain bearing, headstock needing constant oiling. A separate countershaft arrangement is needed to vary the spindle speed by changing belts over differing pulley sizes and by engaging a back gear. Its sole saviour it that it has a Tee slotted cross slide, enabling various attachments to be fitted. The topslide design is a source of problems, needing a large weakening hole in the crosslide to locate and secure the topslide with awkwardly accessed screw fixings.

With Stepperhead the intention was to bring the homeworkshop lathe up to speed by a series of modular components that could enable the machine to change from being a basic simple lathe, then by adding separate packages i.e. stepper motors to drive the axes via a simple stepper drive circuit and finally by adding a laptop computer to CNC operation with an infinite range of threads and feed speeds in metric or imperial enabling the ability to perform many other operations. The spindle speed is inverter controlled from 15 to 3000 rpm. Backgear is enabled by a simple polyvee belt change. The ability to raise and lower the head and tailstock relative to the bed provided a massive range of operations, plus the ability to index the spindle as well as move the X and Y axes together or independantly enables infinite operation either manually or by CNC control.

The savings gained by eliminating the following items:- a separate countershaft, a back gear arrangement, a speed feed/thread gearbox, a tumbler reverse, and a spindle clutch, would have easily paid for the computer, stepper drives and motors and provided a quiet versatile machine.

Alan

Edited By Alan Jackson on 29/06/2022 10:14:12

Bob Unitt 129/06/2022 10:45:51
avatar
222 forum posts
33 photos
Posted by Neil Wyatt on 28/06/2022 18:42:15:The Myford VMB (mill) and Mystro MK2 (a wood lathe) were made in Taiwan.

Neil

I bought a VMB direct from Myford in the 90's, having visited the factory. I was told by the guy selling it that what came from Taiwan was used pretty much as just a set of castings. They were completely stripped down, all the supplied electrics thrown away, casting-sand cleaned out, mating surfaces corrected as required, some bearings replaced, and then rebuilt with all-new electrics. They may also have replaced the motor, but I can't swear to that as it was some time ago. Certainly mine hasn't given me any trouble since I bought it.

ega29/06/2022 10:59:41
2567 forum posts
203 photos

On the place of manufacture point, I have an expensive pair of walking boots whose label states "ENGINEERED IN ITALY"; on the normally invisible reverse, however, appears "MADE IN ROMANIA"!

The boots are nonetheless excellent.

Hopper29/06/2022 11:02:17
avatar
6694 forum posts
347 photos

Ironic. These days Taiwan has the reputation of making good quality machine tools. Maybe not the absolute world's best but very good quality and widely used in industry. They are much more expensive than the Chinese equivalent though, so no longer a cheap deal.

I don't think there is any question the current Myford lathes are made in UK. They say their components are all made in the Halifax area in their promotional video.

John Haine29/06/2022 11:11:29
4718 forum posts
273 photos
Posted by Bob Unitt 1 on 29/06/2022 10:45:51:
Posted by Neil Wyatt on 28/06/2022 18:42:15:The Myford VMB (mill) and Mystro MK2 (a wood lathe) were made in Taiwan.

Neil

I bought a VMB direct from Myford in the 90's, having visited the factory. I was told by the guy selling it that what came from Taiwan was used pretty much as just a set of castings. They were completely stripped down, all the supplied electrics thrown away, casting-sand cleaned out, mating surfaces corrected as required, some bearings replaced, and then rebuilt with all-new electrics. They may also have replaced the motor, but I can't swear to that as it was some time ago. Certainly mine hasn't given me any trouble since I bought it.

So it was Myford that held in one of the column mounting bolts with paint on mine then?

Kiwi Bloke29/06/2022 11:26:22
702 forum posts
1 photos

I really don't know what to make of these rather underhand advertising videos. Perhaps what's not said is more significant than what is said.

I wonder what will become of the shelf-loads of beds, countershaft brackets, and all the other very obviously used major components? When 'reconditioned' is mentioned, I expect the major components of a machine to be kept together: will these be? Perhaps they will be fettled and made to look like new. They will be a little under-size, according to original specifications. Does that matter? Well-aged castings are no bad thing, and if machined well should be just fine - possibly better than original production. Will these components form the basis of a 'newly manufactured' - and priced - machine?

The leadscrew shown in one of the videos looked cut, not rolled. There is/was a leadscrew manufacturer in Halifax, that produced leadscrews by 'thread whirling'. Is the work-hardened surface of a rolled thread significantly better? The bed and slideway finishes seem to be milled, not ground or scraped. If accurate, how much does this matter?

All things change. Myford lathes are dinosaurs. I suppose it's lucky someone has done a 'Jurassic Park' for the Myford name and products. The new factory is rather different from the Beeston works, where one could also see the MG12 cylindrical grinders being made. Hand scraping was a crucial part of manufacture of those, and there was a most sophisticated grinding machine producing the spindles. The S7 tapered bronze spindle bearing was hand scraped too.

I suppose it all comes down to quality control. It must be easier to monitor subbed-out QC if it's just down the road, as opposed to somewhere in China. I hope to see the new factory's metrology lab in a video...

When I went round the Beeston factory and saw the re-badged Taiwanese milling machines, having just seen a beautiful 280 lathe, apparently neglected in a store-room, I knew the end must be near.

Edited By Kiwi Bloke on 29/06/2022 11:29:37

lfoggy29/06/2022 13:34:25
avatar
196 forum posts
18 photos

I purchased a new Myford 254 back in 1997. It was a quite modern lathe at the time. It has electronic variable speed and now built in DRO, camlock spindle and full metric or imperial options. Even by today's standards it is competitive. I was always surprised that this model didn't completely displace the 7 series machines....

Edited By lfoggy on 29/06/2022 13:48:04

All Topics | Latest Posts

Please login to post a reply.

Magazine Locator

Want the latest issue of Model Engineer or Model Engineers' Workshop? Use our magazine locator links to find your nearest stockist!

Find Model Engineer & Model Engineers' Workshop

Sign up to our Newsletter

Sign up to our newsletter and get a free digital issue.

You can unsubscribe at anytime. View our privacy policy at www.mortons.co.uk/privacy

Latest Forum Posts
Support Our Partners
Dreweatts
Eccentric July 5 2018
cowells
Rapid RC
Eccentric Engineering
Subscription Offer

Latest "For Sale" Ads
Latest "Wanted" Ads
Get In Touch!

Do you want to contact the Model Engineer and Model Engineers' Workshop team?

You can contact us by phone, mail or email about the magazines including becoming a contributor, submitting reader's letters or making queries about articles. You can also get in touch about this website, advertising or other general issues.

Click THIS LINK for full contact details.

For subscription issues please see THIS LINK.

Digital Back Issues

Social Media online

'Like' us on Facebook
Follow us on Facebook

Follow us on Twitter
 Twitter Logo

Pin us on Pinterest

 

Donate

donate