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Nostalgic moment

Pure chance I saw this!

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Peter Greene 🇨🇦25/05/2022 01:29:02
510 forum posts
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Posted by John Hinkley on 24/05/2022 11:13:37:

I bought it for the princely sum of £26 and 10 shillings in 1984. It was 50 years old, then and I was 17, having recently passed my driving test. I spent a lot of time and what was to me a lot of money rebuilding it and giving it a respray in British Racing Green (what else?).

Did you get the special right leg upgrade to enable you to get some level of braking?smiley

John Hinkley25/05/2022 08:53:14
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1332 forum posts
426 photos
Posted by Peter Greene 🇨🇦 on 25/05/2022 01:29:02:

Did you get the special right leg upgrade to enable you to get some level of braking?smiley

Ah, yes, the brakes - or rather lack of. Never really got any real braking from them, but just enough to scrape through the MOT. Ironically, I think the poor brakes actually improved my driving . You had to learn to anticipate the road and traffic conditions and have a constantly changing plan to avoid collisions! I remember once, four-up, going to a dance at the Orchid Ballroom in Purley that included a fairly steep decent to a T-junction. I only just managed to stop before the junction, with both my feet on the brake pedal and my front seat passenger hauling on the handbrake lever, whilst I made my way down the gearbox. That was pretty scary, but hey, we were young and immortal in those days!

John

Michael Gilligan25/05/2022 09:17:13
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20182 forum posts
1053 photos

It’s not important, John … but I’m still curious about that date and currency mis-match

MichaelG.

John Hinkley25/05/2022 09:54:38
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1332 forum posts
426 photos

MichaelG,

Did my reply yesterday not cover that? I mistyped - I should have written 1964 not 1984.

John

Michael Gilligan25/05/2022 11:40:22
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20182 forum posts
1053 photos
Posted by John Hinkley on 25/05/2022 09:54:38:

MichaelG,

Did my reply yesterday not cover that? I mistyped - I should have written 1964 not 1984.

John

Very sorry, John blush

I somehow missed your entirely adequate reply, yesterday

MichaelG.

Chris Evans 625/05/2022 11:49:38
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2057 forum posts

I am loving this thread having owned several vintage cars in the past including an Austin Seven.

Learnt to drive on a Swift, my first car was a 1929 Lea Francis and I once went to view a Sunbeam Harrington LeMans. I really wanted the Sunbeam but after three visits to view where the owner could not find the key I lost interest. Old pre war bikes are my passion now

Bazyle25/05/2022 12:37:09
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6324 forum posts
222 photos

The mention of a Ford Pop by Samsarand reminded me of my mother's first car. I can still instantly remember the registration number sixty years later but struggle to remember the whole of the number of the car I was actually driving half an hour ago. Age?

Samsaranda25/05/2022 13:48:29
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1430 forum posts
5 photos

Bazyle, I am glad I am not alone with memory problems. Dave W

John Hinkley25/05/2022 13:51:46
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1332 forum posts
426 photos

Glad to see I'm not the only one on here who has the odd senior moment, Michael!

I'm also pleased that the thread has stirred some happy memories for many. Goodness knows, we need some uplifting times right now.

John

Robert Dodds25/05/2022 16:58:11
320 forum posts
62 photos

This 1935 Ford Greyhound served me well through my apprenticeship from 1954 to 1959. Cost £85 and sold on for £80. We both survived several bumps, rod brakes and all that. It had several engine refurbishments including a broken crank, but as it was 3 bearing, the front half carried on running, no drive to the clutch and flywheel of course and knocking like crazy,. All good fun though.

Bob D

arw223008.jpg

Robert Atkinson 225/05/2022 20:49:16
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1208 forum posts
20 photos
Posted by Nicholas Farr on 24/05/2022 23:20:53:

Hi Nigel B, Opps! blush bit more like a Bedford HA van, but it did have a very good turning circle.smile

Regards Nick.

My first "car" was a Bedford HA van. Bought in 1883 for £50 and did most of my learing in it. As bought it had a habit of going into reverse instead of first. A mate and I dropped the gearbox and found the thin wall tube suporting the gear selector was bent at one end. I forget the exact deatils but a replacement was turned up from a bit of aerospace ggrade structural steel tube at a local company as a favour. Aftter it was all back together the Haynes manual arrived and apparently we should have taken the engine out rather than just unding the mounts and pushing it forward. We didn't hve a engine crane or similar. I drove it from Bristol to Northern Ireland fand back on holiday. Unfortunatly the person I sold too crashed it while under the infuence.
For such a common van at the time they are rare now and fetch relatively high prices. Most rusted away.
SWMBO was watching "antiques road trip" the other week and called out "you are on the TV". Turned out they were shg8owing a clip about Thrust SSC (Which I helped build and run) and I was in the background.

Robert G8RPI.

Nicholas Farr25/05/2022 21:15:36
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3360 forum posts
1542 photos

Hi Robert, I guess you mean 1983 as there weren't many about in 1883. I had to change the clutchplate in mine but didn't take the engine out, it was done with a little bit of struggling, by cocking the front end up, but I did have the use of an overhead hoist and a pit to work in where I worked at the time, but a clutch alignment tool was essential, which of course was made on the lathe at work.

Regards Nick.

Jon Lawes26/05/2022 07:22:13
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926 forum posts
Posted by Robert Atkinson 2 on 25/05/2022 20:49:16:
.... Turned out they were showing a clip about Thrust SSC (Which I helped build and run) and I was in the background.

Robert G8RPI.

I have a funny feeling I remember that coming to Boscombe Down for testing? Or did I make that up?

Georgineer26/05/2022 11:02:31
577 forum posts
32 photos
...After it was all back together the Haynes manual arrived and apparently we should have taken the engine out rather than just undoing the mounts and pushing it forward.

It's not uncommon for manuals to suggest doing things the long way round. For example, to get the Morris Minor master cylinder out (according to the Morris workshop manual), one was supposed to drop the whole offside suspension to get enough clearance to withdraw the master cylinder fixing bolts from the chassis rail.

We used to undo enough of it to get access to the torsion rod with a crowbar, then gently lever the torsion rod until the bolt could be removed. When re-assembling, the bolt was entered from the other end with the nut behind the torsion rod. Problem solved!

There's something similar on my current car, where one is supposed (according to the Haynes manual) to remove the steering wheel and half the dash to replace bulbs behind it. 'Tain't necessary!

George

Robert Atkinson 226/05/2022 12:47:42
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1208 forum posts
20 photos
Posted by Jon Lawes on 26/05/2022 07:22:13:
Posted by Robert Atkinson 2 on 25/05/2022 20:49:16:
.... Turned out they were showing a clip about Thrust SSC (Which I helped build and run) and I was in the background.

Robert G8RPI.

I have a funny feeling I remember that coming to Boscombe Down for testing? Or did I make that up?

Yes it did a couple of times. We spalled the concrete in one of the ground running bays with the re-heat . Though the bay was rated for the Phantom which used the same engines (RR Spey 202) the car was closer to the ground.
I also visited Boscome down to rob parts from ne of their phantoms for the car. We needed the alternators and control unit but as we had to take the enges out to get to the alternators we had the engines too

Yes The HA was 1983.

Robert G8RPI.

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