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Myford induction hardened beds

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Lathejack24/04/2022 22:16:09
312 forum posts
329 photos

I remember when Myford used to advertise the option of a hardened bed for the Super 7 it stated that a hardened bed was not available for the long bed Super 7, I was always a little puzzled by this.

So on one of my visits to the Myford works at Beeston I asked Mr Moore why hardening was not an option for the long bed. He replied that it was simply because at the time he had sixty long bed raw castings in stock that were cast from a grade of iron that could not be hardened. This wasn't many years before he decided to sell up, so I wonder what happened to all those bed castings.

Anyway, I still miss the old Myford factory and the odd chat with Malcolm Townsend.

ega24/04/2022 23:16:50
2565 forum posts
203 photos

I have a fairly distinct memory of being shown round a workshop with a long, induction hardened bed S7 many years ago.

SillyOldDuffer25/04/2022 08:03:02
Moderator
8862 forum posts
1995 photos
Posted by ega on 24/04/2022 23:16:50:

I have a fairly distinct memory of being shown round a workshop with a long, induction hardened bed S7 many years ago.

Quite likely hardeded long-beds were made at times, just not consistently. Lathejack said ' So on one of my visits to the Myford works at Beeston I asked Mr Moore why hardening was not an option for the long bed. He replied that it was simply because at the time he had sixty long bed raw castings in stock that were cast from a grade of iron that could not be hardened. '

As Myford were in business for over 70 years and the Super 7 was in production for about half a century, like as not that the exact specification varied over time. It's unusual for manufacturers to make everything themselves in-house, because specialists normally knock out better components for less cost. Unlikely Myford ever made their own nuts, bolts, washers, motors, paint or electric cable!

Does anyone know which parts Myford made themselves from scratch? My guess is most components were outsourced: castings, electrics, gears, bearings, belts, paint, lead-screws, handles, etc. Myford owned and improved the design, accurately machined the lathe-specific parts and completed the lathe to a standard. Much more than a simple assembly operation but not everything was made by Myford, and some variation is inevitable.

Dave

mgnbuk25/04/2022 08:51:19
1198 forum posts
72 photos

Does anyone know which parts Myford made themselves from scratch?

Can't say definitively, as I only visited their works a few times on the open days & when passing to get spares plus I own '60s built version, but probably more of the metal bits than you might of thought.

Small screws & nuts (like gib screws & locknuts & the special dome headed screws for the switch bracket as examples) on my lathe are different in design & rather better made than some"commercial" stuff + are chemically blacked rather than left bright. On one open day visit, a CNC lathe had a stillage full of leadscrew handle bodies (later solid type) made from bar stock next to it & in the gear cutting department one machine was set up making the keyed changewheel sleeves. I would not be suprised to find that they made (or machined from bought -in castings) most items in house.

Some years ago I "found" a British Casting Research Institute (or similar UK trade body) pamphlet from the '50s in a Hay on Wye bookshop that featured the ML7/Super 7 bed casting as an example of state-of-the-art mass production casting technology of the time, plus the use of die cast parts for brackets, covers etc. suggests that Myford were using the best available technology when the ML/Super 7s came out to maximise production at lowest unit cost. I would also expect that, coming out of a period of war production, that they were probably "self sufficient" with regard to what may now be regarded as "bought in" small parts to better guarantee production during uncertain times - continuing to make such small parts in-house would give better control of costs as well as supply post war ?

WRT to bed paint colours, my un-hardened mid-60s built Super 7 has the gap between the shears painted the same cream that the cover logos are highlighted with.

Nigel B.

Martin Kyte25/04/2022 08:58:40
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2781 forum posts
53 photos

Certainly die cast half nuts were made for Myford not by Myford. They got a bit rare a few years back when the dies wore out.

regards Martin

noel shelley25/04/2022 09:51:10
1435 forum posts
23 photos

Myford DID NOT make all the parts or accesories they sold ! Many moons ago The quick change tool posts were made by a fellow in the west country, who would go to Beeston, collect blank materials, return to his workshop, machine, and a week later head back to Beeston to deliver the finished items and collect more blanks. I bought an unused bed mounted capstan attachment from said fellow ! He told me his work had a letter stamped on as Identification. Noel.

Nigel McBurney 125/04/2022 10:14:21
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1004 forum posts
3 photos

Until the 1970s uk industrial practice was to make a high content of a product inhouse,I worked for a subsidary of a typewriter maker,all they bought in was raw material,castings, and plastic mouldings ,though were setting up a plastic moulding shop. and the company was proud that they made the majority of components. very often other industries only bought in goods that needed a vast tooling investment or special knowledge, EG high pressure zinc and aluminium die castings,Allen screws, steel castings, Of course there were cases where some industries bought in components a lot earlier in the 20th century, the car industries generally bought in electrical components,tyres,etc alot depends on the the size of the company ,the capital available,factory space etc.I later worked for a multi national whose manufacturing practice was to " buy in "components where ever possible.

Alan Donovan25/04/2022 15:55:49
66 forum posts
35 photos
Posted by SillyOldDuffer on 25/04/2022 08:03:02:

Does anyone know which parts Myford made themselves from scratch? .......................

Hello again,

With respect to the Myford lathes, it is true that some Myford (Beeston) components/assemblies were made by others, but they prided themselves in that wherever possible they would manufacture the component parts themselves.

They 'bought in' the obvious items like standard fasteners, standard bearings (ball & plain), electric motors, drive belts, paint. Castings were bought in from outside suppliers but machined by Myford. Fabrication work was undertaken externally by others, but any post fabrication machining was undertaken by Myford.

However, to pick-up on a previous post they rolled their own leadscrews (cannot remember if they rolled their own feedscrews), but they did cut all their own gears and manufactured their own ball handles. Some fasteners were made 'in house' where there was not a commercial alternative that suited the 'design intent', but these were rare. All machines were painted 'in house'.

A.

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