By continuing to use this site, you agree to our use of cookies. Find out more
Forum sponsored by:
Forum sponsored by Forum House Ad Zone

Oops

All Topics | Latest Posts

Search for:  in Thread Title in  
Perko728/02/2022 06:16:02
425 forum posts
33 photos

Knocked over a bottle of Bakers Soldering Fluid on my workbench, mopped up with paper towels and washed any equipment or materials it touched but wondering what else I should do. Workbench surface is plywood with clear polyurethane finish but pretty battle scarred. Some spilt onto concrete floor and rubber matting as well. Any suggestions?

Michael Gilligan28/02/2022 07:22:45
avatar
20200 forum posts
1053 photos

See 6.3 here: **LINK**

https://toolmedia-res.cloudinary.com/image/upload/toolbank/downloads/cossh/0030.pdf

MichaelG.

Thor 🇳🇴28/02/2022 10:55:41
avatar
1632 forum posts
46 photos

Since Bakers Fluid is acidic you may use a sodium bicarbonate solution to neutralize the acid, shouldn't harm your concrete floor.

Thor

Samsaranda28/02/2022 11:00:41
avatar
1430 forum posts
5 photos

Surely the cement in the concrete would neutralise the Bakers Fluid, I would be more worried about any residual fluid trapped in the scratches on the bench surface, it’s amazing how only a small volume of the fluid can cause problems, don’t ask how I know. Dave W

Perko728/02/2022 12:06:47
425 forum posts
33 photos

Thanks all for the speedy responses.

I already found a MSDS online MichaelG but thanks for the one you provided.

After mopping up the spill I waited a while to see what reaction if any resulted. Seems like the accumulated oil/dust/rust/dirt ingrained in the benchtop simply neutralised the relatively mild acid properties of the flux as no apparent ill effects an hour later. Likewise the concrete floor appeared unharmed as well as the rubber floor mat. Did notice a 'soapy' feel on the skin of my fingers which came in contact with it when mopping up, but that soon disappeared after washing my hands again.

The only tools that came in contact was a pair of side cutters which I washed and then sprayed with light oil.

Assorted bits of metal lying on the bench which were also splashed with flux were washed and left to dry.

Interestingly, I use an old artists flat painbrush about 6mm wide to apply the flux. It never gets washed and after several years the only damage is some slight corrosion of the aluminium ferrule. The timber handle and the bristles seem to have survived fairly well, although the bristles have suffered from applying flux to surfaces already heated by the soldering iron/blowtorch..

I'll see what everything looks like in the morning. Expecting some light surface corrosion on the steel bits but that won't be a problem.

Robert Atkinson 228/02/2022 12:19:25
avatar
1210 forum posts
20 photos

The MSDS is typically generic and "scary" The clean up instructions are totally generic. I'd second neutralising with bicarbonate of soda.

The MSDS has toxicity data for Ammonium Chlorate, an ingredent of Bakers Fluid. I'm currently chewing a Swedish licorice sweet that is liberally coated in Ammonium Chlorate..... Don't drink Bakers Fluid though.

Robert g8RPI.

SillyOldDuffer28/02/2022 14:06:52
Moderator
8699 forum posts
1967 photos
Posted by Robert Atkinson 2 on 28/02/2022 12:19:25:

...

The MSDS has toxicity data for Ammonium Chlorate, an ingredent of Bakers Fluid. I'm currently chewing a Swedish licorice sweet that is liberally coated in Ammonium Chlorate..... Don't drink Bakers Fluid though.

Robert g8RPI.

Ammonium Chlorate, nasty stuff, is almost certainly a typo for Ammonium Chloride.

The Chloride is pretty safe whether used as a flux or for flavouring (E510).

I'd mop up a spillage as much as possible, neutralise with Sodium Bicarbonate, and flush with water, being careful to keep the wet away from metal. If Baker's gets on or into metal objects, clean them thoroughly - chlorides promote corrosion. (Remember what salt water does to mild-steel!)

Dave

Bazyle28/02/2022 17:18:37
avatar
6325 forum posts
222 photos

I think part of the reason Bakers Fluid works is that the ammonium part decomposes to release hydrochloric acid which has a nasty habit of wafting around the workshop to find your most precious micrometer or other tool to promote rust on.

Robert Atkinson 228/02/2022 18:28:05
avatar
1210 forum posts
20 photos
Posted by Robert Atkinson 2 on 28/02/2022 12:19:25:

The MSDS is typically generic and "scary" The clean up instructions are totally generic. I'd second neutralising with bicarbonate of soda.

The MSDS has toxicity data for Ammonium Chlorate, an ingredent of Bakers Fluid. I'm currently chewing a Swedish licorice sweet that is liberally coated in Ammonium Chlorate..... Don't drink Bakers Fluid though.

Robert g8RPI.

Oops you are right,. My mistake, rushed post, BUT it is chloride in both Bakers fluid and nordic licorice.

Mark Rand28/02/2022 18:53:29
1275 forum posts
28 photos

Yes, ammonium chlorate flux could get "quite exciting". laugh

Michael Gilligan28/02/2022 19:50:17
avatar
20200 forum posts
1053 photos

Just to be clear … My reason for referencing 6.3 in the MSDS was that the advice is very simple:

”Clean spillage area thoroughly with plenty of water.”

MichaelG.

Andy Stopford28/02/2022 19:55:43
158 forum posts
18 photos
Posted by Mark Rand on 28/02/2022 18:53:29:

Yes, ammonium chlorate flux could get "quite exciting". laugh

It might be quite exciting as a coating for licorice sweets too...

Perko701/03/2022 12:52:30
425 forum posts
33 photos

Well after more than 24 hours the end result is:

Plywood 1, Bakers Soldering Fluid 0.

Concrete floor and rubber mat unharmed. Bits of steel on the bench were washed and now show only light surface rust most likely from residual moisture after washing. Affected tools which were washed and oiled show no after-effects.

Some of the ingrained dirt/rust/metal filings on the bench changed colour but the timber itself appears unharmed. It might have helped that over the last few days we have been experiencing the greatest rainfall ever recorded, with over 80% of our annual rainfall being recorded in a 3-day period causing widespread flooding. Humidity has been in the 90%+ range during this time too.

Regardless, next time I'll be more careful and remember not to leave opened bottles of anything where they can be knocked over.

Michael Gilligan01/03/2022 14:01:42
avatar
20200 forum posts
1053 photos

Good result yes

MichaelG.

Mike Poole01/03/2022 14:22:10
avatar
Moderator
3344 forum posts
74 photos

I have actually tasted Bakers Fluid, it was not a gourmet experience. It was only a tiny splash but it is a particularly foul experience, I suppose it was marginally better then getting it in my eye but I strongly recommend not tasting it, and it takes a lot of rinsing to get rid of the taste, I don’t remember it doing any real harm but I was rinsing within seconds of tasting and didn’t swallow any. Petrol is another taste that I find difficult to recommend, I had a rather larger sample of that trying to prime a siphon.

Mike

All Topics | Latest Posts

Please login to post a reply.

Magazine Locator

Want the latest issue of Model Engineer or Model Engineers' Workshop? Use our magazine locator links to find your nearest stockist!

Find Model Engineer & Model Engineers' Workshop

Support Our Partners
Eccentric Engineering
Rapid RC
Eccentric July 5 2018
cowells
Dreweatts
Subscription Offer

Latest "For Sale" Ads
Latest "Wanted" Ads
Get In Touch!

Do you want to contact the Model Engineer and Model Engineers' Workshop team?

You can contact us by phone, mail or email about the magazines including becoming a contributor, submitting reader's letters or making queries about articles. You can also get in touch about this website, advertising or other general issues.

Click THIS LINK for full contact details.

For subscription issues please see THIS LINK.

Digital Back Issues

Social Media online

'Like' us on Facebook
Follow us on Facebook

Follow us on Twitter
 Twitter Logo

Pin us on Pinterest