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What are the yellow fittings please

What are the yellow fittings please

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Former Member29/01/2022 12:34:50
1085 forum posts

[This posting has been removed]

John Rutzen29/01/2022 12:39:04
352 forum posts
19 photos

Cat's eyes? So you can see where you are going in the fog?

Martin Connelly29/01/2022 12:50:23
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2137 forum posts
222 photos

Lateral resistance plates. They are on the sleepers on the bend to stop fast trains pushing the sleepers towards the outside of the bend.

Trackwork LRP Central Fitment - Imtram

Martin C

Former Member29/01/2022 13:49:28
1085 forum posts

[This posting has been removed]

old mart29/01/2022 18:38:53
3771 forum posts
233 photos

Looking at the rail surface, they are either very new, or the line is very little used.

Tim Stevens29/01/2022 20:54:29
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1598 forum posts

Surely, they are there to bolt the electric rail to, if ever there is enough current to support it.

Tim

Nicholas Farr29/01/2022 21:42:54
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3360 forum posts
1542 photos

Hi Tim Stevens, just expanding Martin's link Lateral Resistance

Regards Nick.

V8Eng29/01/2022 23:26:05
1701 forum posts
1 photos

Having seen the speed that some modern trains travel through bends at I do not find it surprising that devices like that are needed!

Edited By V8Eng on 29/01/2022 23:26:48

Mick B130/01/2022 09:25:27
2191 forum posts
120 photos
Posted by Tim Stevens on 29/01/2022 20:54:29:

Surely, they are there to bolt the electric rail to, if ever there is enough current to support it.

Tim

Ah, so those flat pickup shoes under old Hornby and Marklin locos are scale reproductions?

I always wondered... wink

Mike Hurley30/01/2022 09:38:57
311 forum posts
87 photos

See the company that markets them is Australian.

Nothing against those lovely people, but isn't it a bit sad that we can't make a fairly simple bit of welded up steel in this country - and save many sea miles of transporting them?

Anway, surely hammering in one simple much longer, wider pointed piece of steel (like a broad sword) against the outer edge of the sleepers would have much the same effect - or am I being too simplistic ( KISS ) ?

regards, Mike

Perko730/01/2022 12:33:13
425 forum posts
33 photos

I think the key term is resistance. There still needs to be some movement available to allow the track to adjust to temperature variations. If the outer ends of the sleepers were rigidly restrained then the straight track leading into the curve could buckle at high temperatures. In the days of short rail sections with bolted fishplates there was enough movement in each joint to adjust to temperature variations, but with continuously welded rail that is not possible.

old mart30/01/2022 15:36:48
3771 forum posts
233 photos

Strange coincidence, I have a book from the library, Branch line to Minehead, by Vic Mitchell and Keith Smith which mentions this. Plate 49 shows a train on a single track curve near Doniford Bridge Halt. There is mention of "concrete monuments (short posts spaced about 20 feet apart on the inside of the curve) at the ballast shoulder helped staff to return the track to its correct position after speeding trains moved it towards the sea". Not exactly a high speed line, either.

Bazyle30/01/2022 19:10:48
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6324 forum posts
222 photos

When you think about the construction of Brunel's broad gauge track it wouldn't have suffered from this. Another tick in the box for that man,

Vintage Gauge 1 enthusiasts will of course have recognised it as stud contact track (modernised).

duncan webster30/01/2022 23:56:28
3984 forum posts
65 photos
Posted by Bazyle on 30/01/2022 19:10:48:

When you think about the construction of Brunel's broad gauge track it wouldn't have suffered from this. Another tick in the box for that man,

But it gave a very rough ride and had to be ripped out and replaced with conventional sleepers. He didn't get everything right

Vadim Cristea01/02/2022 12:27:04
2 forum posts

never saw them before, and I never thought those can be used that way

Journeyman01/02/2022 15:21:53
avatar
1159 forum posts
235 photos
Posted by Mike Hurley on 30/01/2022 09:38:57:

See the company that markets them is Australian.

Nothing against those lovely people, but isn't it a bit sad that we can't make a fairly simple bit of welded up steel in this country - and save many sea miles of transporting them?

Anway, surely hammering in one simple much longer, wider pointed piece of steel (like a broad sword) against the outer edge of the sleepers would have much the same effect - or am I being too simplistic ( KISS ) ?

regards, Mike

They are probably from here - Trackwork Doncaster UK

John

Nigel Graham 220/02/2022 20:46:17
2132 forum posts
29 photos

Re the comments on conductor rails.

London Underground apart, it's only the ex- Southern Railway / BR Southern Region lines that use third-rail electrification; and the conductor rail is outside of the running rails, not between them. It is mounted on inverted-cup ceramic insulators, and partially shrouded by parallel boards.

(I know 'cos I live at the Dorset end of the Weymouth - London (Waterloo) via Poole and Southampton, line; their furthest extent of electric operation. The same company's / region's Exeter - Waterloo route via Yeovil Jcn & Salisbury was never electrified.)

I don't know where the Tube's third rail is situated w.r.t the running rails.

'

The photographed track looks very new, which could explain the rusty appearance. I suggest it's replacement work that's not yet carried enough trains to become polished.

Edited By Nigel Graham 2 on 20/02/2022 20:50:10

V8Eng21/02/2022 08:02:07
1701 forum posts
1 photos
Posted by Nigel Graham 2 on 20/02/2022 20:46:17:

Re the comments on conductor rails.

London Underground apart, it's only the ex- Southern Railway / BR Southern Region lines that use third-rail electrification; and the conductor rail is outside of the running rails, not between them. It is mounted on inverted-cup ceramic insulators, and partially shrouded by parallel boards.

(I know 'cos I live at the Dorset end of the Weymouth - London (Waterloo) via Poole and Southampton, line; their furthest extent of electric operation. The same company's / region's Exeter - Waterloo route via Yeovil Jcn & Salisbury was never electrified.)

I don't know where the Tube's third rail is situated w.r.t the running rails.

'

The photographed track looks very new, which could explain the rusty appearance. I suggest it's replacement work that's not yet carried enough trains to become polished.

Edited By Nigel Graham 2 on 20/02/2022 20:50:10

The London Underground is a 4 rail system with (I think) one conductor rail in the running track centre with the other one beside the running track, the conductor rails are mounted on insulators.

I do not know which conductor rail has what function though.

Hope that makes sense.

 

Edited By V8Eng on 21/02/2022 08:08:56

Frances IoM21/02/2022 08:17:51
1265 forum posts
28 photos
the outside track is power compatible with the national rail 3rd rail systems that share the track in many places, the inner rail is a return as LT run a very dense service and this allows more trains/section whereas in the non-LT 3rd system return is via the running rails
Martin Connelly21/02/2022 08:54:17
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2137 forum posts
222 photos

Merseyrail use the third rail outside of the running rail system.

orrell park station.jpg

Martin C

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