By continuing to use this site, you agree to our use of cookies. Find out more
Forum sponsored by:
Forum sponsored by Forum House Ad Zone

Is it possible to by "100% non-stick" spatulas for spreading glue? (ideally made from teflon/FEP)

All Topics | Latest Posts

Search for:  in Thread Title in  
John Smith 4724/01/2022 21:19:56
393 forum posts
12 photos

Hello

Is it possible to buy a spatula made for Teflon (or something similar that is totally non-stick) for spreading glue?

Thanks

J

Robert Butler24/01/2022 21:49:25
382 forum posts
6 photos

No, glue is very sticky.

Robert Butler

John Smith 4724/01/2022 22:16:42
393 forum posts
12 photos
Posted by Robert Butler on 24/01/2022 21:49:25:

No, glue is very sticky.

Robert Butler

I have a plastic Plastic Spatula Set from Pinflair.

https://www.pinflair.co.uk/pinflair-plastic-spatula-set

I think they made from PP (or PE??). Either way, I am finding that glue is quite hard to remove if you allow any, albeit accidentally to set/start to set. Part of the problem is that they have slightly frayed. Either way, they are certainly don't shed glue anything like as well as PTFE/FEP would.

Kitchen spatulas seem to be mostly made from Nylon or silicone rubber, neither of which would be OK.

J

Edited By John Smith 47 on 24/01/2022 22:28:00

Grindstone Cowboy24/01/2022 22:25:17
854 forum posts
64 photos

You can buy packs of thirty or so plastic spreaders from various vendors very cheaply, use once then throw away? No good for the environment, of course.

Rob

John Smith 4724/01/2022 22:26:56
393 forum posts
12 photos
Posted by Grindstone Cowboy on 24/01/2022 22:25:17:

You can buy packs of thirty or so plastic spreaders from various vendors very cheaply, use once then throw away? No good for the environment, of course.

Rob

> No good for the environment, of course.

Exactly.

Andrew Steward24/01/2022 22:28:45
18 forum posts

I make glue…

wooden splints, cheap as chips and not as bad as plastic, just throw them away.

as someone else said, glue is sticky.

when dry / cured you may be able to peel it from the Teflon but no just don’t do it.

Robert Butler24/01/2022 22:43:02
382 forum posts
6 photos

I have a plastic Plastic Spatula Set from Pinflair.

Give them a try then or do as suggested earlier!

Robert Butler

peak424/01/2022 22:43:13
avatar
1671 forum posts
175 photos

I've never seen them in the UK, at a justifiable price, though ebay shows US laboratory suppliers with them, so that might be somewhere to start. https://www.coleparmer.co.uk/i/ptfe-coated-lab-spatula-w-1-5-flat-taper-x-1-25-flat-round-ends-1-pk/0636911
You can buy sheet PTFE and make your own, it cuts an planes OK with woodworking tools, but it's not a cheap material.
https://www.directplastics.co.uk/ptfe-sheet

I save up my ice lolly and Magnum sticks from the summer

Bill

Edited By peak4 on 24/01/2022 22:45:29

Nicholas Wheeler 124/01/2022 23:06:32
906 forum posts
86 photos
Posted by John Smith 47 on 24/01/2022 22:26:56:
Posted by Grindstone Cowboy on 24/01/2022 22:25:17:

You can buy packs of thirty or so plastic spreaders from various vendors very cheaply, use once then throw away? No good for the environment, of course.

Rob

> No good for the environment, of course.

Exactly.

 

When using complex chemical mixes for critical applications - any 2 pack glue/paint/filler/rubber/etc - using one use disposable mixing cups, stirring sticks, gloves, applicators is better than buggering up the cure and effect by reusing old ones. Shop rags are the same, you don't know what it was soaked in before you tried wiping down your expensive new paint job.

Edited By Nicholas Wheeler 1 on 24/01/2022 23:32:02

John Smith 4725/01/2022 00:32:23
393 forum posts
12 photos

To get clear, my understanding is that absolutely nothing will stick not a nice smooth surface of PTFT (Teflon) or FEP (its transparent close cousin).

I find my Pinflair spatulas are rather useful and can help with spreading adhesives, particularly the thicker stuff, broadly flat. Depending on what you're doing, it's also useful having a choice of widths... However like I say, I am finding that adhesive does slightly stick to them, worse where they are slightly frayed... And it would be nice to be able to use super-easy to clean ones made from PTFE/FEP/similar. 
Also even though if others here think it's fine to b*gger up the environment with spatulas (even if they are plastic?), the Pinflair ones also cost me c. £7.00, so I'm keen not to just chuck them out for both reasons.

J


PS On another none, re rags, when not using disposable paper, I actually use a load of lint-free (pale blue) microfibre cloths to wipe stuff down with, including say very small amounts of epoxy adhesive (which will then set hard) which I then throw into a washing machine and re-reuse. They look a bit rough, eventually of course I will throw them out if/when they get too damaged, but it works great for me.

Edited By John Smith 47 on 25/01/2022 00:41:03

John Smith 4725/01/2022 00:36:47
393 forum posts
12 photos
Posted by peak4 on 24/01/2022 22:43:13:

I've never seen them in the UK, at a justifiable price, though ebay shows US laboratory suppliers with them, so that might be somewhere to start. https://www.coleparmer.co.uk/i/ptfe-coated-lab-spatula-w-1-5-flat-taper-x-1-25-flat-round-ends-1-pk/0636911
You can buy sheet PTFE and make your own, it cuts an planes OK with woodworking tools, but it's not a cheap material.
https://www.directplastics.co.uk/ptfe-sheet

I save up my ice lolly and Magnum sticks from the summer

Bill

Re buying sheet solid PTFE, I rather tempted. But it's not cheap stuff. What thickness do you think would suffice? 2mm? 3mm? I have no idea how flexible and/or physically strong the stuff is.

J

EDIT:
I still haven't managed to find any sensible-looking, reasonably wide PTFE (/PTFE-coated?) spatulas, but I did find these:

https://www.amazon.co.uk/CrafTreat-Teflon-Bone-Folder-Set/dp/B07QXNTJSV


They certainly CAN be used to apply glue...

Although the Ergo Square doesn't have a handle it it might have had merit in boing thinner & much more flexible... but either way, being PTFE I guess they would be dead-easy to wipe clean. Might work (??)

Either that or yes, buy a load of lollypop sticks. At least they wouldn't be quite so bad for the environment as  innumerable, single use, plastic spatulas!
 

J

Edited By John Smith 47 on 25/01/2022 01:11:30

John Smith 4725/01/2022 01:45:26
393 forum posts
12 photos

Btw, what are the pros & cons of using a notched adhesive spreader?



I suppose the idea is to helps you get the correct thickness of adhesive on.
On the down-side, your adhesive layer ends up with lots of lines through it...

Have you ever used them?

Pete.25/01/2022 01:58:26
avatar
794 forum posts
232 photos
Posted by John Smith 47 on 25/01/2022 00:36:47:
Posted by peak4 on 24/01/2022 22:43:13:

I've never seen them in the UK, at a justifiable price, though ebay shows US laboratory suppliers with them, so that might be somewhere to start. https://www.coleparmer.co.uk/i/ptfe-coated-lab-spatula-w-1-5-flat-taper-x-1-25-flat-round-ends-1-pk/0636911
You can buy sheet PTFE and make your own, it cuts an planes OK with woodworking tools, but it's not a cheap material.
https://www.directplastics.co.uk/ptfe-sheet

I save up my ice lolly and Magnum sticks from the summer

Bill

Re buying sheet solid PTFE, I rather tempted. But it's not cheap stuff. What thickness do you think would suffice? 2mm? 3mm? I have no idea how flexible and/or physically strong the stuff is.

J

EDIT:
I still haven't managed to find any sensible-looking, reasonably wide PTFE (/PTFE-coated?) spatulas, but I did find these:

https://www.amazon.co.uk/CrafTreat-Teflon-Bone-Folder-Set/dp/B07QXNTJSV


They certainly CAN be used to apply glue...

Although the Ergo Square doesn't have a handle it it might have had merit in boing thinner & much more flexible... but either way, being PTFE I guess they would be dead-easy to wipe clean. Might work (??)

Either that or yes, buy a load of lollypop sticks. At least they wouldn't be quite so bad for the environment as innumerable, single use, plastic spatulas!

J

Edited By John Smith 47 on 25/01/2022 01:11:30

Wrap a small bit of clingfilm around the spatula, spread your glue, remove clingfilm and replace.

Alan Charleston25/01/2022 05:07:46
134 forum posts
22 photos

Hi,

It is possible to powder coat teflon onto a metal base. If you got a stainless steel spatula with the dimensions and flexibility you required a powder coating firm should be able to put a teflon coat on it for you.

I use a piece of scrap teflon sheet to mix epoxy glue on. The wet glue sticks to it but easily peels off when it has cured.

If you want the glue to not adhere to the spatula when you are smoothing it out, your best bet is to coat the spatula with a liquid which the glue won't stick to. For example, the packet my silicone sealant came in recommended dipping the tools your using in water with a bit of detergent in it. Just be careful the liquid you use doesn't interfere with the adhesion properties of the glue - silicone oil would be a definite NO I would guess.

Regards,

Alan C.

pgk pgk25/01/2022 06:30:17
2549 forum posts
293 photos

Perhaps the answer is to go back to biodegradable glues - hide or pine resins or bluebell mucilage or egg proteins spread with wood or cardboard spatulas and then composted.
Lots of tool coating options but always a danger they'll interfere: candle wax, car ceramic coating polish? Heat will soften many glues - a steel spatula warmed afterwards? Some glues have a clean-up protocol - acetone for epoxy? keeping within the working time of glues helps too. Another approach may be to use two part glues with one applied to each surface by spray or glues that have a setting method such as UV light or himidity, Application with a smooth non-porous applicator - PTFE or glass roller?

Which also begs the question whether the end product is recyclable and biodegradable

pgk

Edited By pgk pgk on 25/01/2022 06:37:01

JasonB25/01/2022 07:18:09
avatar
Moderator
22560 forum posts
2634 photos
1 articles

Why not use some scraps of ABS or rubber, it seems none of your glues will stick to that, allow to set and peel it off any residual glue so you can use again.

Just cut a strip from a Poly Prop bottle or container and put it back in the recycling after use.

Notched or comb spreaders give a more measured and constant film thickness. If you use a flat spreader it is hard to tell if you have the same amount of adhesive over the whole surface. A notched one will leave a constant height bead and remove the rest of the adhesive between notches so when you put the parts together those beads spread to an even thickness. I used notched spreaders a lot for work.

These days Vegans may not approve of some of the old adhesives PGK suggests

 

Edited By JasonB on 25/01/2022 07:51:56

Danny M2Z25/01/2022 08:27:06
avatar
962 forum posts
1 photos
Posted by John Smith 47 on 24/01/2022 21:19:56:

Hello

Is it possible to buy a spatula made for Teflon (or something similar that is totally non-stick) for spreading glue?

Thanks

J

Actually, you might want to consider what the English Ashes team use to coat their gloves with as nothing sticks to that.

I heard that Novac J is being considered as a batting coach for the English cricket team as it took almost two weeks to get him out.

For spreading epoxy, nothing beats an old credit card.

Martin Kyte25/01/2022 08:44:20
avatar
2721 forum posts
48 photos

The main requirements are that the spatula should be flexible and very smooth. The peel strength of most glue is fairly low so with a flexible spatula the spatula can be peeled off the glue.

regards Martin

pgk pgk25/01/2022 08:45:44
2549 forum posts
293 photos
Posted by JasonB on 25/01/2022 07:18:09:

These days Vegans may not approve of some of the old adhesives PGK suggests

Forget the hide glues and eggs then - how about human donated mucilage? Finally a benefit from collecting Covid snot ( could also save all the norovirus product from cruise ships and bring back biosolid housing)laugh

 

Edited By pgk pgk on 25/01/2022 08:46:04

Michael Cox 125/01/2022 09:36:13
549 forum posts
27 photos

I save the wooden stirrers from Costa coffee for mixing epoxy adhesives. The small tubs of milk supplied with a cup of tea in some cafes I also take home and wash. These make excellent pots for mixing small quantities of Epoxy adhesive.

Mike

All Topics | Latest Posts

Please login to post a reply.

Magazine Locator

Want the latest issue of Model Engineer or Model Engineers' Workshop? Use our magazine locator links to find your nearest stockist!

Find Model Engineer & Model Engineers' Workshop

Latest Forum Posts
Support Our Partners
Rapid RC
Dreweatts
Eccentric Engineering
cowells
Eccentric July 5 2018
Subscription Offer

Latest "For Sale" Ads
Latest "Wanted" Ads
Get In Touch!

Do you want to contact the Model Engineer and Model Engineers' Workshop team?

You can contact us by phone, mail or email about the magazines including becoming a contributor, submitting reader's letters or making queries about articles. You can also get in touch about this website, advertising or other general issues.

Click THIS LINK for full contact details.

For subscription issues please see THIS LINK.

Digital Back Issues

Social Media online

'Like' us on Facebook
Follow us on Facebook

Follow us on Twitter
 Twitter Logo

Pin us on Pinterest