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Harrison 250

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Peter Simpson 312/01/2022 10:02:20
40 forum posts

Has anybody moved a Harrison 250 if so. Would removing the lathe from the makers stand be a problem to ease the lifting and moving. My workshop in my garden so lifting the entire lathe from the drive would be rather difficult.

Thanks Peter

Andrew Johnston12/01/2022 10:18:52
avatar
6574 forum posts
701 photos

I understand that Harrison lathes were fitted to the stand and aligned at the factory. It would be regarded as an all round bad idea to split them.

Andrew

Richard Millington12/01/2022 10:53:29
61 forum posts
4 photos

I would certainly leave the bed attached to the stand, but when I moved my old Boxford BUD I removed the headstock, motor, saddle and tailstock so it was easy to get into a Berlingo.

Maybe worth looking into for the Harrison.

Spurry12/01/2022 13:46:19
220 forum posts
72 photos

Andrew's comment is correct regarding the factory alignment. My M250 was replaced by Harrisons when I bought it in 1986, because of a problem with the bed to stand joint.

I would agree with Richard that you could remove such bits as the motor, tailstock, end cover and splashback, to make it a little lighter.

Pete

Richard -12/01/2022 13:47:00
60 forum posts
7 photos

Hi Peter, Have a look at Harrisonlathe.groups.io if you search there is lots of information. The manufacture process is the same for the M250 or M300.

Single eyebolt through the bed is the correct method for lifting, I made a purpose built wheeled dolly to fit and made a path with shuttering ply as required.

Best of luck, Richard

Spurry12/01/2022 13:56:34
220 forum posts
72 photos

You could always mount on 5 wheels, which makes single-handed movement a doddle.

Pete

img_2860.jpg

Peter Simpson 312/01/2022 14:07:27
40 forum posts

Thanks for the replies. I'm torn between keeping my Boxford ME10 and getting a slightly bigger lathe. As stated my workshop is in my back garden. Between the gravel drive there is a gravel path and an 18" retaining wall to negotiate. When I put my Tom Senior milling machines and my laths into the workshop I stripped them down to smaller "lumps" me and her in doors managed it with a few cross words. The problem with a Harrison 250 is that it's probably 3 times the weight of the Bpxford and the Myford..

Gavel paths and drives are fine unless you want to shift heavy objects.

Edited By Peter Simpson 3 on 12/01/2022 14:07:59

ega12/01/2022 14:38:13
2496 forum posts
200 photos

Spurry:

How is that third wheel lowered, please?

I can see what seems to be a short lever in your photo but presumably it needs to lift the considerable imposed load.

Spurry12/01/2022 17:46:47
220 forum posts
72 photos

EGA

If you have a look in my album, there are several pictures of the mod. (It is not my original idea BTW.)

The actual raising and lowering action results from a cam action, so not much effort is required. The little odd-shaped piece is the auto lock.

Pete

Norfolk Boy12/01/2022 18:11:42
66 forum posts
18 photos

Hi Spurry, I have an M250 and they are quite low, so can see 2 benefits with that set up, gaining height and flexibilty. I will definitely use that idea. Where did you source the stout looking wheels? I am sure some may think it would affect ultimate accuracy but I would be more than happy with the trade off.

Alan

JohnF12/01/2022 18:43:24
avatar
1146 forum posts
189 photos

"Gravel paths and drives are fine unless you want to shift heavy objects."

Thick plywood sheets will help here, the least expensive types used as shuttering etc, you probably only need 2 and move along as you go using rollers or skates.

If there is a slope then a block & tackle is useful to pull the lathe along, I/we loaded a large lathe onto an Ifor trailer via the ramps with a block & tackle plus some harness etc. Do remember though lathes in particular are top heavy so take care.

John

Spurry12/01/2022 18:57:06
220 forum posts
72 photos
Posted by Norfolk Boy on 12/01/2022 18:11:42:

Hi Spurry, I have an M250 and they are quite low, so can see 2 benefits with that set up, gaining height and flexibilty. I will definitely use that idea. Where did you source the stout looking wheels? I am sure some may think it would affect ultimate accuracy but I would be more than happy with the trade off.

Alan

Being 6'3", the increase in bed height does reduce the amount I have to bend. The ability to move the machine at will is a huge benefit too. I guess the wheels would probably have come from Ebay, paid by Paypal 16/6/2010, at cost of £42.50. Cannot recall the exact seller, sorry.

Pete

Gavlar13/01/2022 16:12:11
102 forum posts
4 photos

If you search ebay for 'pallet truck wheels' it will come up with wheels very similar with solid tyres and reletively high load ratiings at a reasonable price.

Example; https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/162999377535?hash=item25f3851e7f:g:EPgAAOSwgoNeYh24

I bought a pair just for this very purpose, to make a dolly for moving a heavy lathe single handed.

Spurry13/01/2022 16:59:34
220 forum posts
72 photos

Gavlar

These look like the ones I bought from Ebay 154566689162. They have been perfectly adequate for my M250, but you may have needed heavier duty.

Pete

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