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Can you identify these hand tools?

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William Handley-Garland22/12/2021 22:00:31
8 forum posts
20 photos

Can anyone tell me what these hand tools are used for?

tools.jpg

IanT22/12/2021 22:23:19
1987 forum posts
212 photos

I'm not certain but I think my Grandad had something like these in his shoe repair-box. Long time ago, when people used to repair their own shoes - of course that might not be what they were actually inteded for!

Regards,

IanT

Michael Gilligan22/12/2021 22:33:22
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20090 forum posts
1041 photos

I have a couple of those, too

Ian is correct, it’s a cobbler’s tool … but it surprised me to find it’s called a ‘Glazing Iron’

**LINK**

https://vintagetoolshop.com/collections/leather-working-tools?page=2

MichaelG.

.

Edit: __ Just found this:

https://leatherworker.net/forum/topic/87294-whats-this-tool-used-for/

Edited By Michael Gilligan on 22/12/2021 22:37:59

James Hall 322/12/2021 23:42:48
76 forum posts
11 photos

The one at the bottom is quite common and is used for measuring lengths or as an aid to drawing a straight line; often referred to as a ruler.

Bill Davies 222/12/2021 23:51:22
277 forum posts
11 photos

It seems a common brand, James, I have one, too.

Martin Kyte23/12/2021 08:27:04
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2725 forum posts
48 photos
Posted by James Hall 3 on 22/12/2021 23:42:48:

The one at the bottom is quite common and is used for measuring lengths or as an aid to drawing a straight line; often referred to as a ruler.

 

Or if you wish to be pedantic a rule.

Glazing Iron or Glass Hammer?

;0)

Happy Christmas

Edited By Martin Kyte on 23/12/2021 08:28:07

Michael Gilligan23/12/2021 09:02:09
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20090 forum posts
1041 photos

Posted by Martin Kyte on 23/12/2021 08:27:04:

.

Glazing Iron or Glass Hammer?

 

.

Is this just more ‘seasonal silliness’ ?

… or didn’t you see the post by Matt S in the thread that I linked ?

… or the set of photos which followed it ?

MichaelG.

.

[quote] Current production: https://www.georgebarnsleyandsons.co.uk/product-page/glazing-iron

 

Edited By Michael Gilligan on 23/12/2021 09:13:51

Anthony Knights23/12/2021 09:04:45
619 forum posts
242 photos

My Dad used to re-sole his boots. He used a tool like the ones shown. It was heated and use to apply blacking (wax?) to the edges of the new soles and heels.

Adam Mara23/12/2021 09:16:30
167 forum posts
3 photos

On a lighthearted note, working in a country ironmongers in the 50's, we often got new apprentices coming into the shop asking for the like of glass hammers, long rests, post holes, sparks for grinders and others items I have fogotten over the years!

Charles Scott-Knox-Gore 123/12/2021 09:27:19
1 forum posts

Don't forget the four candles (No , 'andles for forks)

Martin King 223/12/2021 09:37:45
984 forum posts
439 photos

Hi All,

Cobblers glazing irons are very common with George Barnsley among the best makes from UK

Some of the French made ones are very collectable and come in a variety of slightly differing numbered profiles.

Used hot as always evidenced by the charred handles; these used to sit on a circular cast iron stand with scalloped edge to hold the tools in or near a flame ready for use.

They do actually "glaze" the welt edges when used correctly.

The holders are seriously rare as nearly always smashed being of very thin section cast iron.

On the silly note: on film sets the new runners were often sent to get a "long weight" or " sky hooks" by the riggers!

Have a great Xmas everyone! Martin

john halfpenny23/12/2021 09:43:26
232 forum posts
24 photos

It's not just engineering apprentices. My pharmacist wife once had to deal with a student nurse requesting a packet of fallopian tubes.

William Handley-Garland23/12/2021 09:58:24
8 forum posts
20 photos

Hi All

Thank you Michael G for the link to the leatherworking website, very informative. Also Anthony for the explanation of why it is used for 'glazing' with hot wax.

Many thanks to Jams for his in depth analysis of the mystery white object in the photo. I have quite a number of these strange numbered sticks around the house but has so far found then useless for cutting or the insertion or removal of fixtures. I presume the two different scales are to accommodate the miserly and the generous, but I do take issue with the suggestion that they are for drawing straight lines see below

rule.jpg

Eric Cox23/12/2021 10:09:47
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543 forum posts
37 photos

Not forgetting striped or tartan paint.

Michael Gilligan23/12/2021 10:23:02
avatar
20090 forum posts
1041 photos
Posted by William Handley-Garland on 23/12/2021 09:58:24:

[…]

… but I do take issue with the suggestion that they are for drawing straight lines see below

rule.jpg

.

Interesting, and potentially misleading, ‘calibration’ on that ^^^

I am assuming that the distance between any two numbered graduations is actually one, not a half

MichaelG.

.

Edit: __ Compare: https://www.graticulesoptics.com/products/stage-micrometers-calibration-scales-grids/stage-micrometers-s-series/s8-stage-micrometer-1mm001mm

Edited By Michael Gilligan on 23/12/2021 10:33:55

Martin Kyte23/12/2021 10:43:10
avatar
2725 forum posts
48 photos
Posted by Michael Gilligan on 23/12/2021 09:02:09:

Posted by Martin Kyte on 23/12/2021 08:27:04:

.

Glazing Iron or Glass Hammer?

.

Is this just more ‘seasonal silliness’ ?

… or didn’t you see the post by Matt S in the thread that I linked ?

… or the set of photos which followed it ?

MichaelG.

.

[quote] Current production: **LINK**

Edited By Michael Gilligan on 23/12/2021 09:13:51

To be honest Michael no I didn't mainly because I beleived you to be correct in calling it a Glazing Iron. My old woodworking teacher used to call Glazing Irons Glass Hammers which came to mind when making the point about 'Ruler' or "rule". A rose by any other name should smell so sweet etc.

regards Martin

MichaelR23/12/2021 10:46:09
avatar
466 forum posts
74 photos

Boot Glazing Iron Circa 1957 National Service, used for bulling up best boots.

spoon.jpg

Michael.

KWIL23/12/2021 11:38:52
3549 forum posts
70 photos
Posted by MichaelR on 23/12/2021 10:46:09:

Boot Glazing Iron Circa 1957 National Service, used for bulling up best boots.

spoon.jpg

Michael.

Hence "spit and polish"

MichaelR23/12/2021 11:46:13
avatar
466 forum posts
74 photos
Posted by KWIL on 23/12/2021 11:38:52:
Posted by MichaelR on 23/12/2021 10:46:09:

Boot Glazing Iron Circa 1957 National Service, used for bulling up best boots.

spoon.jpg

Michael.

Hence "spit and polish"

Yes that was the term, Ha memories.

Michael.

Keith Wyles23/12/2021 13:47:03
94 forum posts

Years ago, I removed the handle from one and mounted it. gets used as a mini anvil. Old fashioned flat irons, mounted upside down also make good small anvils.

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