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Tool identification

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colin hamilton17/10/2021 08:01:08
66 forum posts
32 photos

Ive just got my first set of hss lathe tools and have a couple of very noddy questions.

It comes with a right and left handed turning tools. They have a groove ground into them. When mounting the tool does they groove go on the top or leading face? It looks, to me, like they would cut in either orientation. Photos below:

20211015_074334.jpg

20211015_074404.jpg

And what is this for?

20211015_074425.jpg

Thanks

Colin

Tony Pratt 117/10/2021 08:33:54
1752 forum posts
8 photos

Groove to the top, bottom tool is for chamfering.

Tony

David George 117/10/2021 08:39:07
avatar
1675 forum posts
497 photos

Hi Colin the groove is on the top of the tool on all three tools. I use this style on softer materials aluminium or EN1A steel for instance to get a good finnish and the third style I would use that as a roughing out tool for the same as the top groove acts as a chip breaker as well.

20171016_161005.jpg

David

colin hamilton17/10/2021 11:43:22
66 forum posts
32 photos

Thanks for the replies

SillyOldDuffer17/10/2021 13:39:10
Moderator
7675 forum posts
1693 photos

Might be wrong but I've always assumed the groove to be a chip-breaker. It's purpose is to snap the long spirals of swarf that otherwise get entangled or form clumps. Chips are easier to clear than spirals.

A swarf ball catapulted by the chuck once hit me hard enough in the face to draw blood. Since then I wear eye protection and clear swarf before it builds up.

Dave

colin hamilton17/10/2021 14:17:30
66 forum posts
32 photos

Just back from trying out my new lathe tools. The turning tools in my first picture are ground to a sharp point. Can I put a bit of a round nose on it or does the chipbreaker groove mean this isnt sensible.

Brian Morehen17/10/2021 14:24:41
avatar
176 forum posts
11 photos

I like the look of the groove cut into these tools,, I wonder if one could cut the same with a worn angle grinder disc may be worth a try?

Regard Bee.M

David George 117/10/2021 15:23:06
avatar
1675 forum posts
497 photos

Hi Colin don't try and put a radius on the cutters with the chip breaker as they will rub and you can't get center height correct. Just grind off the end of the tool and a rub with a sharpening stone on the cutting edge. I use the corner of a grinding wheel along the groove and sometimes use a small diamiter grinding point in a dremmel to smooth it out. Don't use on brass, bronze, cast iron or similar materials as they will grab and chatter.

David

Edited By David George 1 on 17/10/2021 15:41:06

colin hamilton17/10/2021 19:15:03
66 forum posts
32 photos
Posted by David George 1 on 17/10/2021 15:23:06:

Hi Colin don't try and put a radius on the cutters with the chip breaker as they will rub and you can't get center height correct. Just grind off the end of the tool and a rub with a sharpening stone on the cutting edge. I use the corner of a grinding wheel along the groove and sometimes use a small diamiter grinding point in a dremmel to smooth it out. Don't use on brass, bronze, cast iron or similar materials as they will grab and chatter.

David

Edited By David George 1 on 17/10/2021 15:41:06

David - thanks for the detailed response

James Hall 318/10/2021 19:48:10
50 forum posts
11 photos

These look remarkably like tools that I bought from our favourite Leicester based supplier and come as a set in a neat wooden box.
When I attempted to use this knife tool I got a lovely finish when facing, but an appalling one when turning along the axis. Contrary to the advice above, I found that very slightly rounding the business end of the tool produced a near-miraculous improvement in finish.

Howard Lewis19/10/2021 11:46:44
5528 forum posts
13 photos

If a tool is to cut properly, it needs to be mounted so that the cutting edge is on centre height.

A slight radius on the cutting edge will improve surface finish, but must extend down the edge to ensure that only the point contacts the work, to prevent the lower part of the tool rubbing.

With regard to describing the hand of the tool, when the tool is mounted, if the edge points towards the chuck, to cut, it is a Right Hand Tool A Left hand Tool faces towards the Tailstock.

Think of it as if you are looking on the point of the tool from the other side of the lathe.

One of my hobby horses is to advise making a Centre Height Gauge, to which tools can be set.

If the tool is on centre height, it should cut well and not produce a pip when facing the end of a bar.

It is easy to make, a good learning exercise, and a saver of time, and frustration in the future.

Somewhere among my albums, there is a picture of the one that I use.

The important thing is ensure the column and base are perpendicular to another. Holding the column in the chuck, and just skimming the base is the easy way of achieving this.

Howard

Howard Lewis20/10/2021 11:11:34
5528 forum posts
13 photos

Failing memory!

Forgot to say that my Centre Height Gauge has two blades. The lower one is there to set the parting tool that is mounted, inverted in the rear toolpost.

Tools in the front toolpost should be set to the underside of the upper blade.

Howard

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