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Rust Protection

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bernard towers24/10/2021 22:35:01
336 forum posts
89 photos

I would look into your anti corrosion oil it obviously doesn’t do what it says on the tin. Try hydraulic oil.

not done it yet24/10/2021 22:46:11
6430 forum posts
20 photos
Posted by Samsaranda on 24/10/2021 17:07:45:

A dehumidifier and oil filled radiator on economy seven and 100 mm of Celotex insulation in the walls and 50 mm Celotex between the roof joists, insulation definitely works. Dave W

Agreed Dave. While describing what works for us also needs an approximate location. Those in the north of Scotland may need more insulation than we do further south. My ceiling 100mm insulation is shortly going to get another 100mm of rock-wool/glass fibre insulation and a further topping of old ply boards insulated with 25mm EPS.

Some on here may be in locations that are quite dry and warm, so don’t need the same degree of insulation. My workshop also has the heating/insulation advantage of actually being inside another structure.

Chris is not so far from you, presumably. Humidity in my workshop is rarely much over 70% and often down around 60% - according to my cheap RH meter.

Chris Suddell25/10/2021 05:41:55
12 forum posts

I think I'm done for because my Lathe and Mill are in a concrete garage with no insulation.

I'm going to clean them up again and apply some rust preventative and I'm going to have to keep on top of them every week. Unfortunately I only use them about every month. Most of my parts are 3d printed.

It looks like the long term solution is to get them out of the garage and into an insulated wooden shed.

Thanks for all the replies.

Samsaranda25/10/2021 08:39:16
avatar
1244 forum posts
5 photos

NDIY, I agree location is an important factor, I am fortunate to live in the South East corner of the country where the climate is vastly different to that of Northern England and Scotland, it’s also the best location for maximum output from P V Solar panels. Eldest daughter lives north of Wigan, we don’t visit her in the winter !!! Dave W

Howard Lewis25/10/2021 13:30:38
5528 forum posts
13 photos

Concrete garages are renowned for "sweating".

May I suggest, if there is enough space, to fix 50 mm battens to the walls and fill the space with glass fibre behind 12 mm ply?

Give the door similar treatment if you possibly can. A metal door is NO insulator.

Paint the ply white and the place will seem much lighter.

If you can apply the same treatment to the ceiling, you will find the place much cosier, and almost devoid of condensation and the rust problems that it causes.

My shop, in East Anglia, is only 10'9" x 6'9" external, 19mm cladding outside, glass fibre between 50 mm frames, walls and ceiling.

The only uninsulated bit is the 3/4" ply floor standing on 8 x 2 bearers protected on three sides, on concrete slabs.

A 2 Kw fan heater rarely runs for more than 15 minutes before the thermostat operates. Then it runs, perhaps for 5 minutes every 30 -40 minutes.

When it is frosty, a 60W tubular heater under the bench produces a bench warm to the touch afetr about 24 hours.

Rust is almost never seen, despite no extra oiling / protection.

Howard.

Dave Halford25/10/2021 14:18:53
1816 forum posts
19 photos
Posted by Chris Suddell on 25/10/2021 05:41:55:

I think I'm done for because my Lathe and Mill are in a concrete garage with no insulation.

I'm going to clean them up again and apply some rust preventative and I'm going to have to keep on top of them every week. Unfortunately I only use them about every month. Most of my parts are 3d printed.

It looks like the long term solution is to get them out of the garage and into an insulated wooden shed.

Thanks for all the replies.

External garages like concrete ones seldom have a damp proof membrane under the floor, that might be your problem.

Howard Lewis25/10/2021 15:19:44
5528 forum posts
13 photos

It would be worth buying /making some duckboards to keep your feet off the cold concrete floor.

When Toys R Us were in business, they sold rubber mats 1 metre square. Cut in half, provided two metres of matting in front of a lathe or milling machine.

Sit down before you look at the price of mats from industrial suppliers, like Cromwell.

But look around for alternatives from cheaper sources.

Amazon do some Wellmax 60 x 40 cm barrier mats for £11.99 with free delivery on the first order.

Have a look on Google to see what is available.

Howard

ega25/10/2021 15:32:12
2318 forum posts
190 photos
Posted by Howard Lewis on 25/10/2021 15:19:44:

It would be worth buying /making some duckboards to keep your feet off the cold concrete floor.

Wear clogs and you will have "duckboards" with you wherever you go.

Breva25/10/2021 21:35:02
avatar
87 forum posts
7 photos

Lanolin does work well. It can be a bit slippy on something you work with every day but good for longterm protection on metal surfaces. Quite cheap also from the bay if you find it in jars for hair care and pleasantly smelling.

Regarding duckboards, farm supplies do what they call cow mats. Dense black foam an 1"+ thick and very durable.

Halfords also had packs of floormatting at a reasonable price. It doesnt like arc welding sparks though!

bernard towers25/10/2021 21:44:27
336 forum posts
89 photos

My bigger machines are in a 30 x 12 brick garage with no dpc and as I have mentioned before on similar threads that they all use hydraulic oil as coolant with no rusting in the last 25 years!!

duncan webster25/10/2021 22:42:31
3581 forum posts
65 photos

When I converted my single skin brick garage I had the floor done with mastic ashpalt. Gets it very smooth and waterproof, ten 25mm foam covered with 22mm flooring grade chipboard. Cut holes in it and use solid packers for machine feet. The as others have said build an inside out shed inside with insulation in the walls. Vapour barrier between the inner skin and the insulation. Now as warm as toast and no rust

The white expanded foam isn't fire rated I believe, the pin stuff is, but is more expensive. You ca get rigidised rockwool as well, known as cavity bats

Edited By duncan webster on 25/10/2021 22:44:05

Peter G. Shaw26/10/2021 11:00:03
avatar
1337 forum posts
44 photos

I always had rusting problems until I fitted a pair of 10W self regulating cabinet heaters from RS Components inside the lathe bed. Used to spray the lathe with WD40, and then had to wipe it off before using the lathe. Since fitting the heaters no more rust.

Downside, especially in this day and age, is that the heaters actually take about 38W so there is a constant electric current drain. But what the heck, it works and prevents all the messy cleanup I used to have to do.

The heaters keep the lathe at a temperature slightly above ambient, whatever ambient is, thus preventing condensation. When I bought my mill/drill, I wedged a piece of aluminium, about 200mm x 100mm x 13mm into the machine base, and screwed a 10W self regulating heater onto it. And again, no rusting to date.

Other people have done similar things, eg a small incandescent bulb under the lathe, or some of the self-regulating heating tape, designed, I believe, as a frost prevention device.

Peter G. Shaw

Jonathon Bywater28/10/2021 08:53:59
22 forum posts

I bought some treated brown paper a few years ago which helped. Then I used slideways oil ,brown paper on top and had virtualy no trouble.

Keith Wyles28/10/2021 14:43:46
76 forum posts

Hand tools I wipe with a rag in a can impregnated with 3in1 oil.

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