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Crankshaft Factory

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Andy Stopford02/10/2021 16:34:45
104 forum posts
16 photos

Fancy going into crankshaft production? Here's how to do it:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-inYCr-fV3Q

PPE (flipflops) must be worn.

Edited By JasonB on 02/10/2021 16:54:47

Rod Renshaw02/10/2021 18:11:41
346 forum posts
2 photos

Amazing video.

It felt a little like watching evolution in action. The first stage lathe and machining was like I imagine James Watt's workshop to have been like, but by the end of the "production line" everything seemed more modern.(well, a little more modern)

Rod

Oven Man02/10/2021 18:12:52
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168 forum posts
31 photos

Did it say BMW or Ford on the boxes?

Peter

Michael Gilligan02/10/2021 18:42:07
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19258 forum posts
959 photos

Am I right in thinking that the ‘Final Check’ is done without any lubricant ?

MichaelG.

Michael Gilligan02/10/2021 19:21:34
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19258 forum posts
959 photos

Aha … ‘Export Quality’ Tractor Parts from Belarus

Search for: crown mf-240 crankshaft

MichaelG.

Dave Halford02/10/2021 19:37:16
1816 forum posts
19 photos

Thanks for that Andy, now all I need is a longer piece of gas pipe on my chuck key.

 

To you sir only £160 in Belarus who knows.

Edited By Dave Halford on 02/10/2021 19:41:20

Mikelkie02/10/2021 20:31:26
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124 forum posts
13 photos

Where am I (or us)?. slip guages, dro's, sine bars, cnc, qtp's etc etc will take me a lifetime making on of those as someone said in a James Watt like workshop. Good video though

Edited By Mikelkie on 02/10/2021 20:32:23

Clive Hartland02/10/2021 22:38:02
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2744 forum posts
40 photos

Lathes being switched off and on by the wall switch, no emergency switch!

Rex Hanman03/10/2021 09:11:48
88 forum posts
Posted by Clive Hartland on 02/10/2021 22:38:02:

Lathes being switched off and on by the wall switch, no emergency switch!

Worse than that.......the guy was actually smoking in the work place! H&S would be furious!

Circlip03/10/2021 09:43:51
1382 forum posts

Yep, we used to work for a living too. Surprising what precision can be achieved with a single chuck key and a lump hammer.

Regards Ian.

Pete Rimmer03/10/2021 10:50:08
1094 forum posts
69 photos

The packaging says steel crankshaft but the chips and sparks say iron

ega03/10/2021 10:59:54
2318 forum posts
190 photos
Posted by Pete Rimmer on 03/10/2021 10:50:08:

The packaging says steel crankshaft but the chips and sparks say iron

Agreed. Founders sometimes use "semi-steel".

What was the process involving rotating a batch inside an enclosure? I thought it looked like some form of heat treatment.

Also, were the oilways completely drilled?

Howard Lewis03/10/2021 11:26:11
5528 forum posts
13 photos

You probably get what you pay for!

Making a crankshaft that is accurate, durable and reliable is not easy.

Many world renowned manufacturers have found that, the hard way!

Get the radii, oilway drilling, heat treatment, nitriding, or surface finish wrong and you soon have a load of seizures or fatigue failures.. Nitriding, and similar salt bath processes have tom be very closely controlled if failures are to be avoided.

Even a good crankshaft can be failed in torsion by hanging the incorrect stuff on the back, or front of it.

Third world countries tend to be more accepting of poor or dubious manufacturing, and think that short life failures are the norm. It is only when they experience good quality components that standards improve.

But, we all have to start somewhere!

Howard

Peter Cook 603/10/2021 11:37:03
187 forum posts
53 photos
Posted by ega on 03/10/2021 10:59:54:

What was the process involving rotating a batch inside an enclosure? I thought it looked like some form of heat treatment.

I assumed it was shot blasting given the surface finish that came out.

Howard Lewis03/10/2021 12:23:38
5528 forum posts
13 photos

Having watched the video, realise that I have seen many crankshafts like those being made. BUT NOT under those conditions.

Wish my eyesight was good enough to read a vernier at such speed. Some gauging, but very little measurement.

They look like spurious spares!

Not uncommon.

I found pistons were being marketed in genuine spares boxes, and the material composition was acceptable.

But the manufacturer did not know that every genuine article could be traced back to the factory, and even the shift, on which the casting had been poured, so it was obvious that they were spurious, and possibly not accurately machined, but being passed off as genuine.

Howard

Fortunately, I and a colleague were spared having to travel to the country concerned to give evidence in the prosecution...

Ady103/10/2021 12:26:57
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4810 forum posts
717 photos

They're fast, but I bet they're not as fast as our Jason

J Hancock03/10/2021 12:37:20
773 forum posts

I wonder what the production line to make AK's from railway lines looks like.

Howard Lewis03/10/2021 12:53:55
5528 forum posts
13 photos

The 15 minutes inside the enclosure was shot blasting. Note the bag being opened and emptied.

Maybe as a means of stress relieving after the rough machining.

From the writing on the grossly overladen truck, would imagine that then factory was further south east than Belarus

Wish that my eyesight was so good that In read a vernier so quickly.

Looked more as if they were being used as gauges rather than measuring.

Note the bolt being used to check the tappings in the crankshaft palm!

The only measurements seemed to be on the grinder.

It all looked very much "near enough is good enough" to me.

But then, I've seen lots of the genuine article being produced, so am biased!

Howard

Andy Stopford03/10/2021 13:21:56
104 forum posts
16 photos

Judging by the uploader's other videos, its in Pakistan. Most of the others seem to show (heavy) vehicle repairs rather than manufacturing.

There's one which shows a truck front axle being overhauled. To us it seems strange to see people belting kingpins, etc. out with sledgehammers when they have a large-ish hydraulic press in the background (later used to straighten the axle beam), but it may be that given a surplus of labour and little or no form of social security, its socially desirable to employ relatives and friends in what appears to be pointlessly labour-intensive work (I remember seeing the same sort of thing in Portugal in the '80s and '90s where every job would have one person actually doing it, and two or three hangers on chatting and passing the occasional spanner).

Despite this, the truck repairers seem impressively skilled at making do with very limited resources - not even a workbench or vice (at one point they use the chuck of a lathe to hold the stub-axle carrier), and of course, no safety boots, or indeed boots at all.

Stueeee03/10/2021 13:23:19
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105 forum posts
Posted by Peter Cook 6 on 03/10/2021 11:37:03:
Posted by ega on 03/10/2021 10:59:54:

What was the process involving rotating a batch inside an enclosure? I thought it looked like some form of heat treatment.

I assumed it was shot blasting given the surface finish that came out.

 

Shot peening, the bag the bloke emptied was full of round shot. Shot peening increases the fatigue life of the unmachined surfaces.

For old car projects, I've had several "one off" cranks made here in the UK, other than starting out as a piece of round billet EN40B, none of the machining processes are any different to those in the YouTube video. These cranks are always Nitrided before final finish grinding.

 

Edited By Stueeee on 03/10/2021 13:24:55

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