By continuing to use this site, you agree to our use of cookies. Find out more
Forum sponsored by:
Forum sponsored by Allendale Jan 24th

Back to Imperial

All Topics | Latest Posts

Search for:  in Thread Title in  
Bazyle17/09/2021 19:29:28
avatar
6038 forum posts
220 photos

I recall the 8ft (2400) length of wood was a standard supplied by the Scandinavians and called a 'deal' and as such sold throughout Europe starting hundreds of years ago. Hence houses everywhere tend to be built using submultiples of it, regardless of units used. 16in stud spacing has never been a 'round' figure that a mathematician might choose, let alone the 14+ a smidge for the noggin. It is only recently that site carpenters apart from the foreman could afford a rule anyway. As for plasterboard not fitting, that's probably 'cos some dumb ass graduate engineer who had never been near a building site wanted to make it a nice 'round' figure.

Peter G. Shaw17/09/2021 20:16:18
avatar
1311 forum posts
44 photos

I'm 78, so older than Mick above, and I much prefer metric. Indeed, I find metric linear measurements much more understandable than imperial. Capacity measurements & weights are someway behing linear measurements, but slowly I'm getting there, and I don't want to go back. Indeed, the whole concept of imperial I find to be a recipe for disaster. Think pennies, shillings, pounds, what a rotten system requiring an in depth knowledge of the 12 times tables and the 20 times table. 100p to the pound is so much easier. Similarly, ounces/pounds/stones/hundredweights/ton's etc. requiring a knowledge of 16's, 14's, etc.

So, as far as I am concerned, although brought up as an imperial child, and am to an extent struggling with the visualization of the various metric quantities, I am slowly becoming au fait with it, indeed in some instances I already do think metric in preference to imperial.

It will be a bad day if we have to revert to imperial.

Peter G. Shaw

Brian G17/09/2021 20:46:26
782 forum posts
34 photos

I bet shopkeepers would love the idea of selling a 2lb bag of sugar for the same price as a kilo.

Brian G

Bill Dawes17/09/2021 21:43:29
472 forum posts

I'm 79, 80 in a couple of months, doing model engineering has made me think back to my apprentice days on the shop floor and drawing office and realise now how ridiculous trying to use dimensions such as 37/64" was. Nostalgia apart, metric is far more logical.

I do however after so many years have the ability to be able to quickly convert in my head approximations of imperial to metric and vice versa. The industrial fan industry I (still) work in deals with markets all over the world and mechanical, chemical, electrical engineers etc. all with favourite units such as cubic feet per minute, m3/hr, inches water gauge, pascal, millibar ad infinitum. There are times however when the metric system falls down, I can readily convert all these but I have always said the bloke that invented inches water gauge new what he was doing, you can see a column of water, how do you visualize a pascal? Easy, convert it to inches water gauge!!

Bill D

Mick B117/09/2021 22:13:34
2018 forum posts
116 photos
Deleted.

Edited By Mick B1 on 17/09/2021 22:16:06

Peter Greene17/09/2021 22:16:18
287 forum posts
2 photos
Posted by Bill Dawes on 17/09/2021 21:43:29:

I'm 79, 80 in a couple of months, doing model engineering has made me think back to my apprentice days on the shop floor and drawing office and realise now how ridiculous trying to use dimensions such as 37/64" was. Nostalgia apart, metric is far more logical.

'Imperial' is not ipso-facto fractions. I have never in my whole (Imperial) Engineering life used fractions, or seen them used seriously on drawings or elsewhere. 37/64 would be 0.578 ±whatever

Steviegtr17/09/2021 22:48:44
avatar
2242 forum posts
311 photos

1 cwt of cement coming back then wasn't that 112lbs.

Anyway don't care. Here in Fuertoventura. You can ask for a half litre or a pint. It gets the result either way.

Steve.

Slightly brown & wobbly.

Colin Whittaker18/09/2021 04:54:04
124 forum posts
12 photos

12 inches to a foot

3 ft to a yard

22 yds to a chain (and also a cricket pitch)

10 sq chains to an acre

10 chains to a furlong

10 acres to a square furlong

8 furlongs to the mile

1 inch to the mile is 1:63,360

16 oz to a pound

14 pounds to a stone

8 stones to a 100 weight

20 cwt to a ton

not to mention short tons and rods, poles and perches

16 fl oz to a US pint and 20 fl oz to an imperial pint.

2 US pints to a US quart, 2 Imperial pints to an Imperial quart.

4 US quarts to a US gallon, 4 Imperial quarts to an Imperial gallon.

42 US gallons to a barrel

and my favourite ...

1 British Thermal Unit = energy needed to raise 1 US pint of water by 1 degF

Are the people who want a return to imperial measurements smart enough to use them?

P.S. There must be a typo above. Please excuse it.

Edited By Colin Whittaker on 18/09/2021 04:55:18

Sandgrounder18/09/2021 06:08:54
229 forum posts
6 photos
Posted by Peter Greene on 17/09/2021 22:16:18:

'Imperial' is not ipso-facto fractions. I have never in my whole (Imperial) Engineering life used fractions, or seen them used seriously on drawings or elsewhere. 37/64 would be 0.578 ±whatever

You were lucky, in the DO where I worked in the 60s all the drawings used fractions such as 37/64" with the occasional decimal one where a tighter tolerance was required, it was only when working for another company in 1971 when the UK changed to decimal currency that the company changed from inch fractions to drawing in millimetres, and both these companies were large Multinationals.

John

Edited By Sandgrounder on 18/09/2021 06:09:35

Edited By Sandgrounder on 18/09/2021 06:12:49

Edited By Sandgrounder on 18/09/2021 06:14:03

Nicholas Farr18/09/2021 08:58:13
avatar
2986 forum posts
1352 photos
Posted by Peter Greene on 17/09/2021 22:16:18:
Posted by Bill Dawes on 17/09/2021 21:43:29:

I'm 79, 80 in a couple of months, doing model engineering has made me think back to my apprentice days on the shop floor and drawing office and realise now how ridiculous trying to use dimensions such as 37/64" was. Nostalgia apart, metric is far more logical.

'Imperial' is not ipso-facto fractions. I have never in my whole (Imperial) Engineering life used fractions, or seen them used seriously on drawings or elsewhere. 37/64 would be 0.578 ±whatever

Hi Peter, below is a scan of part of a commercial drawing showing one of the views of a general arrangement of a machine that I've actually done maintenance on.

drawing.jpg

And this is the drawing info showing all the tolerances in fractions.

drg-info.jpg

This is just one of the many drawings that I've seen during my working life that have used imperial measurements using fractions and it was common even for awhile after the general use of the metric system although many were using decimals instead of fractions also.

Regards Nick.

Anthony Knights18/09/2021 09:09:47
562 forum posts
234 photos

My current project is an model American civil war cannon. The drawings came off the internet and are in imperial fractions - an absolute nightmare. I am in the process of converting all the dimensions to millimetres, just to make life easier.

Nicholas Wheeler 118/09/2021 09:18:29
739 forum posts
51 photos
Posted by Colin Whittaker on 18/09/2021 04:54:04:

12 inches to a foot

3 ft to a yard

22 yds to a chain (and also a cricket pitch)

10 sq chains to an acre

10 chains to a furlong

10 acres to a square furlong

8 furlongs to the mile

1 inch to the mile is 1:63,360

16 oz to a pound

14 pounds to a stone

8 stones to a 100 weight

20 cwt to a ton

not to mention short tons and rods, poles and perches

16 fl oz to a US pint and 20 fl oz to an imperial pint.

2 US pints to a US quart, 2 Imperial pints to an Imperial quart.

4 US quarts to a US gallon, 4 Imperial quarts to an Imperial gallon.

42 US gallons to a barrel

and my favourite ...

1 British Thermal Unit = energy needed to raise 1 US pint of water by 1 degF

Are the people who want a return to imperial measurements smart enough to use them?

Anyone who has ever had to explain imperial measurements to someone who has only used metric will know that once you get to the 12 inches to a foot/3 feet to a yard/20 fl oz in a pint/8 pints to a gallon/16 oz to a pound/ 14 pounds to a stone list they'll tell you you're mental. And if you're deluded enough to consider it a system, let alone one that's somehow better, then they'd be right.

Chris Evans 618/09/2021 09:23:37
avatar
1959 forum posts
Posted by Anthony Knights on 18/09/2021 09:09:47:

My current project is an model American civil war cannon. The drawings came off the internet and are in imperial fractions - an absolute nightmare. I am in the process of converting all the dimensions to millimetres, just to make life easier.

When the metric system was introduced to engineering the first thing we would do is sit and convert the drawing sizes to imperial. Not because we could not think in metric terms but to suit the imperial measuring equipment we had. I am 73 and to this day prefer to use an imperial depth micrometer to a metric one whereas other metric measurement equipment does not bother me and all my machines are metric.

not done it yet18/09/2021 09:30:08
6322 forum posts
20 photos

Colin and Nicholas are completely “on the button”.

ALL measurements can be expressed as metric or imperial - it’s just that the sensible units are all metric and virtually everything we buy now is in standard metric units.

Looking at the number of ‘beer guts’ in our population, it mught be a good idea to change from pints to half ltres! Not that it would change the habits of some drinkers.

Nicholas Wheeler 118/09/2021 10:21:10
739 forum posts
51 photos
Posted by not done it yet on 18/09/2021 09:30:08:

Colin and Nicholas are completely “on the button”.

ALL measurements can be expressed as metric or imperial - it’s just that the sensible units are all metric and virtually everything we buy now is in standard metric units

Let's not fall into the 'blah blah unit' makes sense trap. Once you have a strong definition and a way of measuring it repeatably, the actual number is unimportant. What makes metric a workable system is that the real world units of length, volume and weight are directly related. That means that all the units derived from them are also related, and thus calculations are straightforward. Then all the multiples have the same quantity and prefix so Colin's list is unnecessary. Finally, they're base 10 and decimal to be consistent with our number system.

Alan Jackson18/09/2021 10:33:11
avatar
232 forum posts
115 photos

Just ask most people what is their height and weight to see how thoroughly they have adapted to the metric system.

I bet a pound to a penny they mostly reply in imperial. That's my two cents.

Alan

John Haine18/09/2021 10:42:39
4170 forum posts
242 photos
Posted by Alan Jackson on 18/09/2021 10:33:11:

Just ask most people what is their height and weight to see how thoroughly they have adapted to the metric system.

I bet a pound to a penny they mostly reply in imperial. That's my two cents.

Alan

In the UK and US, right perhaps. But in the UK, not my grandchildren and many others. Anyway as I read the short newsd item it was only allowing the use of imperial weights, not dictating them. Traders in our local market have been using imperial anyway.

noel shelley18/09/2021 10:48:05
758 forum posts
19 photos

Spot on Alan, recently went to hospital - was asked height and weight, gave both as imperial, not sure what the nurse wrote down ? Noel.

vic newey18/09/2021 10:58:28
avatar
102 forum posts
59 photos

They are not returning us to the imperial system though, it just means you will be free to use it if you are a trader. Just remember that market traders were being taken to court and fined for selling fruit by the pound and then forced to buy metric scales in order to obey Brussels.

Mike Poole18/09/2021 11:05:17
avatar
Moderator
3071 forum posts
72 photos
Posted by mechman48 on 17/09/2021 17:32:34:

..I am sure that for foodstuffs it makes little difference as long as you aren’t supplied with 453.6g and charged for 500g'

Are you sure your not; & by the way I've not seen anything on sale with a weight of 453.6g it's always 100g, 450g, 500g, 1kg increments.

George.

A jar of Robertson’s Golden shred Marmalade is labelled as 454g, pretty close to 1lb in my book.

Mike

All Topics | Latest Posts

Please login to post a reply.

Magazine Locator

Want the latest issue of Model Engineer or Model Engineers' Workshop? Use our magazine locator links to find your nearest stockist!

Find Model Engineer & Model Engineers' Workshop

Latest Forum Posts
Support Our Partners
cowells
BOLDON
rapid Direct
JD Metals
Eccentric July 5 2018
walker midge
Warco
emcomachinetools
Eccentric Engineering
Subscription Offer

Latest "For Sale" Ads
Latest "Wanted" Ads
Get In Touch!

Do you want to contact the Model Engineer and Model Engineers' Workshop team?

You can contact us by phone, mail or email about the magazines including becoming a contributor, submitting reader's letters or making queries about articles. You can also get in touch about this website, advertising or other general issues.

Click THIS LINK for full contact details.

For subscription issues please see THIS LINK.

Digital Back Issues

Social Media online

'Like' us on Facebook
Follow us on Facebook

Follow us on Twitter
 Twitter Logo

Pin us on Pinterest