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crossword clue

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pgk pgk23/08/2021 08:11:46
2324 forum posts
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“Name of machine part only women use” 8 letters

Answer is in white – highlight to see (Cognomen)

pgk

Ady123/08/2021 08:54:02
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4754 forum posts
715 photos

I'm glad I hate crosswords and looked at the answer after 60 seconds

I've not seen that word in 60 years, never mind the 10 years I've been playing with lathes

not done it yet23/08/2021 09:34:33
6350 forum posts
20 photos

Me too, except I had to look up the word on t’nternet! Perhaps because I followed the science route at school, rather than humanities…

Gary Wooding23/08/2021 09:46:35
873 forum posts
227 photos

I've never heard of that word.

The obscurity is terrific!

Mike Hurley23/08/2021 10:08:33
185 forum posts
69 photos

Surely its a hanging offence to use the phrase ' only women ' these days?

roy entwistle23/08/2021 10:47:32
1411 forum posts

What part of a machine is it ?

SillyOldDuffer23/08/2021 10:50:46
Moderator
7573 forum posts
1681 photos

Solving cryptic crosswords is a bit like engineering. An interesting challenge, where the individual answers aren't always obvious, but come together as a satisfying whole. Cryptic crosswords and engineering both require a fair amount of free time, and just like engineering, not everyone enjoys doing them! Crosswords can be deeply frustrating, just like engineering!

Crosswords have rules that must be learned and practised too; cryptic answers have to go 'ding, ding, ding':

  • Machine part = cog
  • Only women = 'no men'
  • Name = 'cognomen', (and women conventionally take the male family name on marriage)

The big difference is engineers can blame their tools; no excuses if you can't do a crossword...

devil

Dave

not done it yet23/08/2021 10:53:31
6350 forum posts
20 photos
Posted by roy entwistle on 23/08/2021 10:47:32:

What part of a machine is it ?

A cog?

martin haysom23/08/2021 12:35:05
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46 forum posts
Posted by not done it yet on 23/08/2021 10:53:31:
Posted by roy entwistle on 23/08/2021 10:47:32:

What part of a machine is it ?

A cog?

no idea

Mick B123/08/2021 15:25:20
2023 forum posts
117 photos
Posted by SillyOldDuffer on 23/08/2021 10:50:46:

Solving cryptic crosswords is a bit like engineering. An interesting challenge, where the individual answers aren't always obvious, but come together as a satisfying whole. Cryptic crosswords and engineering both require a fair amount of free time, and just like engineering, not everyone enjoys doing them! Crosswords can be deeply frustrating, just like engineering!

Crosswords have rules that must be learned and practised too; cryptic answers have to go 'ding, ding, ding':

  • Machine part = cog
  • Only women = 'no men'
  • Name = 'cognomen', (and women conventionally take the male family name on marriage)

The big difference is engineers can blame their tools; no excuses if you can't do a crossword...

devil

Dave

I think the clue is clumsy and weak.

'Cognomen' means literally 'known name' (from cognoscere - to know) so its nearest English match is 'nickname' - although Romans passed them to succeeding generations.

A better clue might be 'Nickname of gear in female-staffed workshop?' . The question mark is conventionally used to indicate there might be a pun in it somewhere.

If both crosswords and engineering train minds for flexibility and lateral thinking, at least engineering has the occasional by-product of a useful or amusing working mechanism!

laugh

Ady123/08/2021 16:07:03
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4754 forum posts
715 photos

omg

No wonder I'm rubbish at xwords

pgk pgk23/08/2021 17:29:50
2324 forum posts
293 photos
Posted by Mick B1 on 23/08/2021 15:25:20:

I think the clue is clumsy and weak.

Blame the Daily Telegraph Crossword Book No3
OH and I try to keep brains ticking over and see who can dredge obscure clue answers out of our heads.

pgk

Nigel Graham 223/08/2021 23:11:13
1712 forum posts
20 photos

That baffled me - but I don't recall ever seeing the word "cognomen" anyway!

My local paper changed its puzzle page somewhat - or the syndicating publisher did - a while ago and the cryptic crossword went up a notch or two in difficulty with it.

I've cracked some of the new compiler's tricks but at times when I see the missed solutions next day there are still one or two that appear to bear no relation to their clues.

Hmmm. Cog - nomen. Well, let's face it, we here know those toothed wheels as 'gears' not 'cogs', so that's us at a disadvantage to the non-engineering readership. Unless we are millwrights in which case the teeth morticed into the wheel rims are 'cogs'.

Michael Gilligan24/08/2021 07:44:45
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18992 forum posts
945 photos
Posted by Nigel Graham 2 on 23/08/2021 23:11:13:

That baffled me - but I don't recall ever seeing the word "cognomen" anyway!

[…]

.

For what it’s worth … the word actually derives from co-gnomen [an associated name], so has litle-or-nothing to do with cogs.

MichaelG.

Mick B124/08/2021 10:16:07
2023 forum posts
117 photos
Posted by Nigel Graham 2 on 23/08/2021 23:11:13:

That baffled me - but I don't recall ever seeing the word "cognomen" anyway!

My local paper changed its puzzle page somewhat - or the syndicating publisher did - a while ago and the cryptic crossword went up a notch or two in difficulty with it.

I've cracked some of the new compiler's tricks but at times when I see the missed solutions next day there are still one or two that appear to bear no relation to their clues.

Hmmm. Cog - nomen. Well, let's face it, we here know those toothed wheels as 'gears' not 'cogs', so that's us at a disadvantage to the non-engineering readership. Unless we are millwrights in which case the teeth morticed into the wheel rims are 'cogs'.

Well mostly we know non-engineers who might use 'cog' to mean 'gear' - which itself of course has several alternative meanings.

This link explores the origin of 'cog' - and that confusion - in its last paragraph:

**LINK**

SillyOldDuffer24/08/2021 10:21:40
Moderator
7573 forum posts
1681 photos
Posted by Mick B1 on 23/08/2021 15:25:20:
Posted by SillyOldDuffer on 23/08/2021 10:50:46:

Solving cryptic crosswords is a bit like engineering. ...

I think the clue is clumsy and weak.

...

If both crosswords and engineering train minds for flexibility and lateral thinking, at least engineering has the occasional by-product of a useful or amusing working mechanism!

laugh

What makes a good cryptic clue, or not, is a subject in itself. I like clues I have some hope of understanding and always start by looking for anagrams.

Although engineers are good at problem solving, they may be too open, honest and literal minded to enjoy cryptic crosswords. Engineering focuses strongly on fact and practical considerations, where tact, people skills, economics, and seeing the big picture are often irrelevant. It may explain why so many engineers are hopelessly naive outside their specialisation. Never imagine understanding a few tools or electrons means you should be running the country.

Cryptic crosswords are more relevant to the murky world of sales, management and politics, where success often depends on decoding what others are up to. Hard to decide if their motives are logical, emotional, they've made a mistake, or are incompetent, clever, greedy, dishonest, or know something you don't. People problems require a cryptic crossword mindset, devious and much dependent on guesswork...

Dave

pgk pgk24/08/2021 10:41:43
2324 forum posts
293 photos

Posted by SillyOldDuffer on 24/08/2021 10:21:40:...

Never imagine understanding a few tools or electrons means you should be running the country.

success often depends ...Hard to decide if their motives are logical, emotional, they've made a mistake, or are incompetent, clever, greedy, dishonest, or know something you don't.

I've edited SOD's contribution to highlight the attributes for running a country......

There is a satisfaction in decoding a cryptic clue but often you need to follow a particular setter to get into their mindset and understand the clues and cues. My wife is the enthusiast but i enjoy the occasional discovery of a word I haven't used in a long time. It can be as simple as 'eventide' or more obscure (outside the House of Commons) 'pusillanimous poltroon' - search Hansard

pgk

Nigel Graham 224/08/2021 11:54:19
1712 forum posts
20 photos

Michael -

I know the word sought had nothing to do with engineering.

Splitting co-gnoman into cog-noman is a typical cross-word play on words, in this case using the mechanical suggestion as "A submarine specimen misleadingly listing to port"!

Michael Gilligan24/08/2021 14:01:23
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18992 forum posts
945 photos

Sorry I bothered mentioning it, Nigel

MichaelG.

Nigel Graham 224/08/2021 14:56:02
1712 forum posts
20 photos

You don't need apologise, Michael! I was not offended or anything! smiley

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