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Anyone know what this is

Can anyone shed any light on this drill bit.

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Steviegtr31/07/2021 22:44:58
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2244 forum posts
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I stole a cache of drill bits on ebay the other day. Most are only what i could call miniature centre drills. Some are only 1mm dia. Up to around 5mm. There were 22 in total all pretty much unused & most are solid carbide.

One drill a 4 flute is to me a bit strange in form. Can anyone tell me what it is. I have not done any google etc yet, but thought i would share with you guys. I am guessing as me some of you will not have seen this profile before. So for those that do know, Prey tell.

Steve.

4.jpg

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1.jpg

Dave S31/07/2021 23:01:04
236 forum posts
49 photos

Suspect it's a combo drill/ mill bit for PCB manufacturing.

Dave

Bill Davies 231/07/2021 23:03:16
246 forum posts
11 photos

Is it a core drill? More rigid than a two fluted drill, used instead on removing material from a cast hole. But I haven't seen one with cutting edges to the centre. But no, the size is far too small.

Bill

 

Edited By Bill Davies 2 on 31/07/2021 23:04:43

Steviegtr01/08/2021 00:34:19
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2244 forum posts
311 photos

I still have no idea.

Steve.

Kiwi Bloke01/08/2021 02:14:38
611 forum posts
1 photos

I think it's rather pedantically called a 'carbide 4-flute drill mill'. Examples shown on www.maritool.com website. Sorry, I can't tell you any more than its name, but it gets one's search engine going. Hopefully, the indefatigable MG will be along soon, with more information, patents, etc.

Michael Gilligan01/08/2021 06:57:00
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18992 forum posts
945 photos
Posted by Kiwi Bloke on 01/08/2021 02:14:38:

I think it's rather pedantically called a 'carbide 4-flute drill mill'. Examples shown on www.maritool.com website.

[…]

.

From whence we learn: Carbide Drill Mills are great for chamfering, countersinking, spotting, and profile milling.

and are invited to: Save tool positions in your machine by using this versatile tool.

Probably convenient in some production scenarios.

MichaelG.

JasonB01/08/2021 07:11:53
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The angle of the end of Stevies does not make it look like the sort that can be used to chamfer and csk as it looks to have a shallower point not a 90deg one which the multi purpose ones have. Just looks to have a 120-130deg point.

The code number is similar to an ITC tooling one but the catalogue doe snot corrispond with the tool shown here, Stevie, what is on the shank just before the size as that may be the maker but can't see due to glare.

jimmy b01/08/2021 08:00:15
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739 forum posts
42 photos

I can't help on this one, but have seen carbide drills with 2 extra "flutes" to give additional strength.

Any chance of some close up pictures of the flutes?

Jim

Michael Gilligan01/08/2021 08:24:54
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18992 forum posts
945 photos

The whole thing [diameter and tip-detail] looks like a custom re-grind to me

What manufacturer would produce a stock product with part of its identification number ground away ??

MichaelG.

MichaelR01/08/2021 09:11:33
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443 forum posts
83 photos

Looking at the flutes it looks like it may be a modified masonry drill.

MichaelR.

old mart01/08/2021 15:50:01
3349 forum posts
208 photos

The difference in the surface finish either side of the step, and cutting off part of the laser etched characters makes me suspect it has been modified for a special job. I think they started life as normal end mills. Having both drill and mill characteristics makes them very versatile for home use.

Edited By old mart on 01/08/2021 15:53:08

Steviegtr01/08/2021 23:16:19
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2244 forum posts
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Posted by JasonB on 01/08/2021 07:11:53:

The angle of the end of Stevies does not make it look like the sort that can be used to chamfer and csk as it looks to have a shallower point not a 90deg one which the multi purpose ones have. Just looks to have a 120-130deg point.

The code number is similar to an ITC tooling one but the catalogue doe snot corrispond with the tool shown here, Stevie, what is on the shank just before the size as that may be the maker but can't see due to glare.

Jason i also found the near No in the ITC cat. Also similar in the Widia range. It appears to be a 4 flute end mill. Although the strange graphic before the S.P No does look a bit like the ITC logo. With a tapered section i guess to cut grooves. ?????.

Steve.

JasonB02/08/2021 06:50:48
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Which part is tapered? or do you mean the "point"

One quick way to tell if it's a regrind may be to have a quick measure of the diameter at the business end and see if it is the 5mm dia engraved on the shank

Howard Lewis02/08/2021 07:40:36
5348 forum posts
13 photos

Certainly two of the edges appear to have been ground like an end mill, or a four facet drill.

Quite a fast helix, so was for some special purpose, not jobber drilling.

Possibly a one off regrind for a specific purpose, known only to the original owner!

Howard

Nick Clarke 302/08/2021 08:25:43
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1260 forum posts
50 photos

Perhaps a tooth chipped 5:00 Friday with a job due out Monday so the chipped tooth is ground back to avoid binding/scoring?

Certainly if the lowest ground tooth is to cut it would suggest a 3mm depth of cut for the other teeth which is unlikely with a 5mm cutter.

SillyOldDuffer02/08/2021 09:13:32
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7573 forum posts
1681 photos
Posted by Dave S on 31/07/2021 23:01:04:

Suspect it's a combo drill/ mill bit for PCB manufacturing.

Dave

I like Dave's theory best.

  • Has a drill tip, so can plunge.
  • 4 flutes, which are for rapid swarf removal and side cutting,
  • Made of carbide, which is good for abrasive materials.
  • Secondary edges are good for removing wisps of fibrous material; some wood drills are like this.

Printed Circuit Boards are made of a highly abrasive insulator, such as fibre-glass, bonded at high pressure in resin. The boards typically make short work of HSS, which is too soft, and are drilled and milled with carbide cutters run at very high speed - 20000rpm or more.

Two mill-drill features are common on PCBs: mounting holes and anti-tracking/isolating slots

dsc06484.jpg

Not an obvious example compared with many but the bottom left mounting hole above, one of four otherwise drilled cleanly, has been widened and ovalled slightly by waggling the cutter. The purpose is allow slack during assembly, rather than go to the trouble of precisely aligning four pillars with four holes.

In the next example, the cutter has made four long slots, which are used to prevent high-voltage tracking or to improve signal isolation via an opto-coupler. No whiskers allowed.

dsc06483.jpg

I think these requirements are met well by Steve's cutter. The fibre trimming feature won't add any value but otherwise I think it should cut metal OK. Try and see. Looks OK in Steve's picture, but if it's been used on PCB, the cutting edge might be blunt.

Dave

Steviegtr02/08/2021 15:56:58
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2244 forum posts
311 photos
Posted by JasonB on 01/08/2021 07:11:53:

The angle of the end of Stevies does not make it look like the sort that can be used to chamfer and csk as it looks to have a shallower point not a 90deg one which the multi purpose ones have. Just looks to have a 120-130deg point.

The code number is similar to an ITC tooling one but the catalogue doe snot corrispond with the tool shown here, Stevie, what is on the shank just before the size as that may be the maker but can't see due to glare.

I think you nailed it Jason & others. The main shank where the writing is measures 5mm exactly. The rest is 4.52mm.

Steve.

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