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Driving style predicts Alzeimer’s …

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Michael Gilligan13/07/2021 07:55:41
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18734 forum posts
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Interesting study, reported in today’s News: **LINK**

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-57670006?xtor=ES-208-[45396_NEWS_NLB_ACT_WK29_Tue_13_Jul]-20210713-[bbcnews_alzheimers_newsbusiness_driving]

MichaelG.

Chris Evans 613/07/2021 08:42:41
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1952 forum posts

An interesting link, I know I driver slower than in my younger days but still not put off longer journeys.....yet.

Anthony Knights13/07/2021 09:18:32
555 forum posts
233 photos

Thankfully, now I am retired, I have no reason to drive long distances. A 40 mile round trip to York hospital is about the furthest I have to go. I haven't noticed me driving any slower, although I do take more care to obey speed limits.

br13/07/2021 09:20:09
697 forum posts
3 photos

Problems driving was the way mine was discovered.. I no longer drive.when I thought I would be able to for twenty or more years to come.

Coping with it is a struggle, especially when you make stupid mistakes and I struggle with others pointing this out to me.

bill

Peter G. Shaw13/07/2021 10:40:38
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I too tend to stick to speed limits better (!) Dementia? Old age? Or just the fact that generally we don't need to get there as quick having set off in good time. Long distance? No problem, except that nowadays we restrict our actual driving time to an hour then stop for a drink or whatever. Perhaps that should "and whatever! After all, at our age (70 & 77) does it matter how long a journey takes? Although it has to be said that our children comment negatively about it. New areas? Can't be bothered! We've found places we like to visit, and now can't really be bothered trying other places, eg we found a caravan site near Oban in 2000, and we are still visiting 21 years later, sometimes even twice a year.

I don't doubt that there might be some connection with Alzheimer's, but given that a) it's the BBC reporting; b) it's a university & c) it's American in origin, and I do wonder if it's someone picking up on some small correlation and seeking to make their name.

Peter G. Shaw

Speedy Builder513/07/2021 11:14:37
2392 forum posts
184 photos

Wow, how interesting. I now walk slower, spend money slower, eat slower - I must be degenerating !!

What a load of old tosh,

Peter G. Shaw13/07/2021 11:26:05
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Speedy,

If you are spending slower, then you are a naughty boy, after all, we have all been exhorted to get out and spend more following the lockdowns!

Mind you, I agree with you.

Peter G. Shaw

Nicholas Farr13/07/2021 11:26:05
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2962 forum posts
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Hi, it maybe that some of the observations of changes in driving may have some merit, but, in my case driving less and not going as far that I used to do, is more to being retired and not needing to go to far off places as much, having said that, I have a two hour drive to do shortly on territory for the most part that I'm unfamiliar with, up to Yorkshire to see my elder sister and brother-in-law, in their new home that they moved too a couple of months ago to be very much closer to their daughters and I am confident that I won't have any problems with my driving, although I don't like driving so much now during the darkness on unfamiliar roads. Don't think I drive any slower than I used too, but have always kept mostly to speed limits, especially the 30 MPH one, but I very rarely deliberately break any of the speed limits now, but the breaking the 30 one is always a complete no no in my eyes and I'll very often use my sat nav just for the over speed warnings it gives even on familiar routes.

Regards Nick.

martin perman13/07/2021 11:38:45
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2005 forum posts
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Just spent four days at the Goodwood festival of speed, 280 mile round trip towing my flat pack caravan, only problems I had was younger drivers who dont seem to know what the pretty orange lights are for on their cars, very speed conscious as towing above 60 mph does seem to draw attention to you.

Martin P

Perko713/07/2021 12:21:25
390 forum posts
31 photos

Here in Australia driving long distances is much more common simply because we are more spread out. Just returned from 4400km caravan trip to central and western Queensland over 18 days with no problem, no fatigue, rest stop every 1.5-2 hours, driving at 90km/hr most of the way because that's the speed the car and caravan seem to be most comfortable at while still giving reasonable fuel economy (11.4L/100km for a 2.5L Subaru towing a 1100kg ATM pop-top caravan). Find that since I took up driving for a living (school bus) I drive a little more carefully and cautiously (which generally means a bit slower) but only because that's the way a school bus needs to be driven, so it becomes habitual in my normal driving too.

br13/07/2021 14:07:09
697 forum posts
3 photos
Posted by Speedy Builder5 on 13/07/2021 11:14:37:

Wow, how interesting. I now walk slower, spend money slower, eat slower - I must be degenerating !!

What a load of old tosh,

 

I hope you are not degenerating. I had a relation who commited suicide as he was unable to cope with being unable to do what he could, remember things, etc.

I have seious issues with it and some days I just wish it was all over .

May you always be a Speedy Builder and never become  a Slower Builder.

I wish you well.

bill

Edited By br on 13/07/2021 14:09:40

Jon Lawes13/07/2021 14:56:42
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636 forum posts
Posted by martin perman on 13/07/2021 11:38:45:

Just spent four days at the Goodwood festival of speed, 280 mile round trip towing my flat pack caravan, only problems I had was younger drivers who dont seem to know what the pretty orange lights are for on their cars, very speed conscious as towing above 60 mph does seem to draw attention to you.

Martin P

I'd imagine towing above 60 would draw attention, isn't the limit 50?

Funny you mention that its always younger drivers that forget to indicate, I usually find the older drivers the guilty parties, especially on roundabouts. I suspect all age groups are guilty, we just perceive one particular group at fault.

Nicholas Farr13/07/2021 15:56:06
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2962 forum posts
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Hi Jon, the towing speed limits are; whatever one is stated, otherwise on a duel carriageway or motorway it is 60 or 50 on a single carriageway if the national speed limit is indicated. Having said that, there are those who don't seem to know, or they just don't care, that you are not allowed in the outside lane on a three lane or more motorway when towing and there are a lot of drivers who don't seem to know that 60 is the maximum speed commercial vehicles can go on a duel carriageway, excluding car derived vans up to two tonnes maximum laden weight.

As far as not indicating goes, I find it is people of all ages and both sexes who seem to be too lazy to indicate, wherever they should. I also find that there are more young ladies than young men who come speeding up behind me and clearly sit inside the tailgating zone, when I'm sticking to the speed limit, years ago it used to be young lads.

Regards Nick.

Edited By Nicholas Farr on 13/07/2021 16:11:09

Colin Heseltine13/07/2021 16:08:58
606 forum posts
218 photos

I'm coming up to 72 and will regularly go out very early on a Sunday morning into the Peak District or up to Yorkshire Moors will the lads in our Caterham/Lotus Sevens., or longer 2/3 day weekends in Scottish Borders. 210hp car, sub 4 seconds to 60. Keeps the mind and reactions working quickly.

Colin

Speedy Builder513/07/2021 18:39:45
2392 forum posts
184 photos

I often travel 40 - 45 mph, do not signal and restrict others overtaking me, but that is when I am in my 1932 Austin 7. That was the speed it was built for. Today, younger drivers do not understand hand signals and they have been deleted from the Highway Code. (Back in 1965, the code even included signals from horse and carriage drivers ! ) BUT we do move on.

Why Why on earth do we have cars that can exceed the speed limit by 200% or more. 70 Mph IS the maximum speed limit, allow a speed max of 100mph to safely overtake and there is no reason to have any more. If you want to speed around a track, buy a track vehicle. But don't label me as a degenerating 74 year old.

Bob

Frances IoM13/07/2021 18:54:51
1154 forum posts
28 photos
"70 Mph IS the maximum speed limit" only in UK - elsewhere you can find unrestricted roads - whether it is safe to greatly exceed 70 is another matter.
Bill Phinn13/07/2021 20:25:51
562 forum posts
86 photos
Posted by br on 13/07/2021 14:07:09:

I have seious issues with it and some days I just wish it was all over .

I wish you well.

bill

Hang in there, Bill.

In the hope that I can make you feel better about your current abilities, I've posted a photo showing a note written by my father four months ago. He has advanced dementia. Don't ask me what the note is trying to say; I've no idea. The date at the bottom wasn't written by him. My mother has Alzheimer's, and is considerably worse than my father.

Amazingly, my father was still driving just over a year ago, and I'd not noticed any significant deterioration in his driving abilities/road sense. It was me that took his car key off him - to protect the public and keep intact his sixty-three year unblemished driving record.

alzheimers note.jpg

Mike Poole13/07/2021 21:42:49
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3057 forum posts
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The first time I sat in my driving instructor’s car he instructed me to drive off and no need to indicate as there was no one around to benefit from the signal which I thought was interesting. The award for bad driving has moved over the years, Volvo drivers were top of the list of vehicles most likely to try and kill motorcyclists, these days it seems honours are shared between Audi and BMW drivers. I don’t know if these observations are backed by the statistics but talk to a group of bikers and they seem to agree.

Mike

Bazyle13/07/2021 23:06:06
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6010 forum posts
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They are very quick to take your licence off you once there is a hint of dementia, even if you appear perfectly fine to non medical people. Not the end of the world for people with a spouse who is ok or someone living in town with busses but disaster for single people in the countryside.
My neighbour at 99&11 months is as bright as a button and only gave up driving two years ago (pushed into it by daughter who funnily enough now has the car). Our ex chairman at 102 is also fully with it though gave up driving a decade ago due to failing eyesight (which hasn't stopped his modelling) At the other end of the scale I know people who have gone into care in their mid sixties.

Bill Phinn17/07/2021 17:25:02
562 forum posts
86 photos
Posted by Bazyle on 13/07/2021 23:06:06:

They are very quick to take your licence off you once there is a hint of dementia, even if you appear perfectly fine to non medical people.

My admittedly limited experience tells me it largely depends on your GP's judgement whether the DVLA revoke your licence. At the time I took my father's car key off him, he had only recently passed a fitness-for-driving assessment done by his GP.

Ultimately, though, the responsibility for whether someone is fit to drive rests with the people closest to them.

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