By continuing to use this site, you agree to our use of cookies. Find out more
Forum sponsored by:
Forum sponsored by Allendale Jan 24th

Blown Bricks : Advice please !

All Topics | Latest Posts

Search for:  in Thread Title in  
Dave Halford12/07/2021 09:42:12
1758 forum posts
19 photos

Michael,

I used to live in a 30's house which had that issue beneath the damp proof course. The front garden wall was similarly affected with some good bricks.

I used the surviving 20% good bricks from garden wall to replace the house ones, you can chisel the old ones out if bad enough. Otherwise it's a filthy angle grinder job.

If your spares pile has any undamaged ones they should be good, but you need either semi engineering bricks for the top of a wall or shaped capping of some kind.

It might pay to leave it another winter to expose the full extent of the damage and buy any replacements after they a have stood in the yard and had a good frost.

Pero14/07/2021 07:24:12
143 forum posts

Hi Michael

I am not sure how many bricks you have to deal with but if there are a lot can I suggest the Arbortech Allsaw for the removal process. I say a lot as the tool is rather expensive. It is however specifically designed for the job ( removal of mortar from between bricks ) and is a lot safer and cleaner than the use of an angle grinder. I have had one for some years, it is not used often but does the job when called on. The company ( Arbortech ) is Australian. They have quite a good website and I believe they have UK distributors for all of their products.

Best of luck with the project.

Pero

Michael Gilligan14/07/2021 08:34:32
avatar
18993 forum posts
945 photos

Thanks, Pero … BUT

Having inspected the free-standing wall that separates our drive from the neighbour, I am almost certain that several courses will need to come off completely, and it may even be better to have the whole thing rebuilt sad

I originally intended to put a roof between this and the House, to become a CarPort, and am currently somewhat relieved that I have’t yet done that. [grateful for small mercies]

Roughly … in the upper half of the wall [which is, of course, exposed to the wind and weather] there are perhaps only 10% of the Scotch Commons which do not have some visible cracking ! … it can only get worse.

MichaelG.

Pero14/07/2021 08:52:55
143 forum posts

Hi Michael

Sounds like full replacement would be the best option, especially if you are planning to use it to support a roof.

On the plus side, it sounds as though demolition should not pose too much of a problem!

Best of luck.

Pero

Michael Gilligan14/07/2021 09:00:41
avatar
18993 forum posts
945 photos

laugh

Nicholas Farr14/07/2021 09:24:53
avatar
3001 forum posts
1371 photos

Hi MichaelG, I'm no builder but, by the looking at your photos and what you describe, I think you will have an everlasting job cutting out bricks and replacing them, it seems quite likely that all of those bricks will suffer the same condition in time, so unless you like doing replacement jobs year on year, your best bet may well be to have it rebuilt with better bricks and will probably be a less expensive option in the long term, and you would have more confidence in making your car port.

Regards Nick.

JohnF14/07/2021 10:06:43
avatar
1099 forum posts
183 photos

Michael, one way of removing the bricks is drill a series of holes through the mortar bed as close together as possible then use on of the carbide side cutting "drills" aka Screwfix etc that fit an angle grinder - works pretty well ! I had to fit a new lintel over a window and used this method suggested by a pal in the building trade, we also used the side cutting bit to remove mortar for re-pointing the brickwork.

As far as bricks are concerned there is a company close to me who manufacture many specialist bricks for all areas of the UK - maybe they can assist ? **LINK**

Hope this helps John

Kiwi Bloke14/07/2021 11:21:48
611 forum posts
1 photos

Mortar chasing chisel bits are available for SDS drills - used in non-rotating mode - and for heftier breakers. Also, of course, hand-held, smacked with lump hammer. Much cleaner than angle grinder, and if the mortar isn't (too) hard, chiselling is ridiculously quick and easy, with minimal risk of collateral damage!

Michael Gilligan14/07/2021 11:46:16
avatar
18993 forum posts
945 photos
Posted by Nicholas Farr on 14/07/2021 09:24:53:

Hi MichaelG, I'm no builder but, by the looking at your photos and what you describe, I think you will have an everlasting job cutting out bricks and replacing them, it seems quite likely that all of those bricks will suffer the same condition in time, so unless you like doing replacement jobs year on year, your best bet may well be to have it rebuilt with better bricks and will probably be a less expensive option in the long term, and you would have more confidence in making your car port.

Regards Nick.

.

Exactly, Nick !!

I spoke to a local builder this morning [who is currently doing some very impressive work nearby] … he will be giving me a quote sometime soon.

They say there’s no use crying over spilt milk … but I feel like I am drowning in it !!

MichaelG.

Raymond Anderson14/07/2021 17:06:44
avatar
785 forum posts
152 photos

Well Michael as a Bricklayer/ Mason I can safely say they will have to be removed and replaced. Its not a major operation to do that. 100mm angle grinder and diamond blade cut in to the beds/joints as far as you can [ will probably be about 30mm ] then a ripping iron or a small SDS Plus breaker and chisel. If that is common brick they will not be rated F2 which are fully frost resistant , more likely to be F1. They actually look like seconds. The damage you see is in no way related to mortar strength its purely not being frost resistant. the old freeze and thaw syndrome.

Michael Gilligan14/07/2021 18:26:03
avatar
18993 forum posts
945 photos
Posted by Raymond Anderson on 14/07/2021 17:06:44:

Well Michael as a Bricklayer/ Mason I can safely say they will have to be removed and replaced. Its not a major operation to do that. 100mm angle grinder and diamond blade cut in to the beds/joints as far as you can [ will probably be about 30mm ] then a ripping iron or a small SDS Plus breaker and chisel. If that is common brick they will not be rated F2 which are fully frost resistant , more likely to be F1. They actually look like seconds. The damage you see is in no way related to mortar strength its purely not being frost resistant. the old freeze and thaw syndrome.

.

Thanks, Raymond … especially for confirming my view about the irrelevance of the mortar strength.

Every time I look at this wall it looks more evident that it will have to come down … and having seen, today, that several of the blue ‘engineering’ bricks that top it are loose; I don’t think that will be a difficult task !!

Paying for the rebuild will be soul-destroying though.

MichaelG.

pgk pgk14/07/2021 18:33:22
2324 forum posts
293 photos

Once again - is it not covered by insurance?

pgk

bricky14/07/2021 18:53:58
522 forum posts
68 photos

Having been a bricklayer and general builder until retirement. I have never seen bricks as bad as those and remedial work of any kind leads me to believe you will continue to have the problem.Just a suggestion if the wall is sound and it is the cosmetic appearance you are concerned with,clad it with verticle feather edge boards or another choice of material,but don't render.

Frank

Michael Gilligan14/07/2021 21:03:25
avatar
18993 forum posts
945 photos
Posted by pgk pgk on 14/07/2021 18:33:22:

Once again - is it not covered by insurance?

pgk

.

I haven’t yet checked with my insurer … but the builder was [regrettably] paid on day rate for “doing work” and I’m sure I wouldn’t get any joy there.

Yes, with 20/20 hindsight, I would have been better negotiating a proper contract [it is, after all, what I was doing for a living at the time], but you know what they say about the Cobbler’s children’s shoes !

MichaelG.

Michael Gilligan14/07/2021 21:06:45
avatar
18993 forum posts
945 photos
Posted by bricky on 14/07/2021 18:53:58:

Having been a bricklayer and general builder until retirement. I have never seen bricks as bad as those and remedial work of any kind leads me to believe you will continue to have the problem.Just a suggestion if the wall is sound and it is the cosmetic appearance you are concerned with,clad it with verticle feather edge boards or another choice of material,but don't render.

Frank

.

Thanks, Frank … but I am now quite convinced that this wall is not sound.

MichaelG.

All Topics | Latest Posts

Please login to post a reply.

Magazine Locator

Want the latest issue of Model Engineer or Model Engineers' Workshop? Use our magazine locator links to find your nearest stockist!

Find Model Engineer & Model Engineers' Workshop

Latest Forum Posts
Support Our Partners
Warco
JD Metals
cowells
emcomachinetools
rapid Direct
walker midge
Eccentric July 5 2018
Eccentric Engineering
Subscription Offer

Latest "For Sale" Ads
Latest "Wanted" Ads
Get In Touch!

Do you want to contact the Model Engineer and Model Engineers' Workshop team?

You can contact us by phone, mail or email about the magazines including becoming a contributor, submitting reader's letters or making queries about articles. You can also get in touch about this website, advertising or other general issues.

Click THIS LINK for full contact details.

For subscription issues please see THIS LINK.

Digital Back Issues

Social Media online

'Like' us on Facebook
Follow us on Facebook

Follow us on Twitter
 Twitter Logo

Pin us on Pinterest