By continuing to use this site, you agree to our use of cookies. Find out more
Forum sponsored by:
Forum sponsored by Allendale Jan 24th

Strimmer /BrushCutter any recommendations ?

All Topics | Latest Posts

Search for:  in Thread Title in  
Michael Gilligan01/07/2021 15:55:38
avatar
18734 forum posts
916 photos

I am getting weary of struggling with down-market two-stroke engines

In the last few years I have bought Ryobi/Stihl/Ryobi and they have all failed after a couple of seasons … poor carburettors and weak sparks.

I don’t really want an electric one, but at least they are reliable !

Before I succumb : Does anyone have a recommendation ?

Heaviest usage is clearing brambles from an area of about 100 square metres, in the field beyond our garden.

Thanks

MichaelG.

br01/07/2021 16:02:45
697 forum posts
3 photos

Michael

Would this be a battery type you need ?

bill

Edited By br on 01/07/2021 16:03:46

Tony Pratt 101/07/2021 16:28:54
1648 forum posts
8 photos

I have a Ryobi & it’s been Ok ish for about 15 years, when it lets me down next time I will try a Stihl, they are meant to be the best 🤔 I’m thinking an electric/battery one may not have the guts for brush cutting?

Tony

Edited By Tony Pratt 1 on 01/07/2021 16:29:44

Cabinet Enforcer01/07/2021 16:41:29
106 forum posts
3 photos

Struggling to reconcile your description of downmarket with the inclusion of Stihl? Which would be my default recommendation, they have a standard 2 year warranty and currently have an "offer" to extend to 3 years with an additional purchase item.

My father has a bent shaft "grass trimmer" type which would happily chew through a small area of brambles, I have one of the commercial size machines which is frankly total overkill for my garden, both get plenty of use, the trimmer also abuse, both stihl and both have been very reliable and give off a reasonble air of being properly engineered. The only shortcoming I would describe about either is that I am not too keen of stihl heads, they seem a bit soft/fragile compared to say an oregon one, but they are pretty much a consumable and a standard M14 fitting.

Edited By Cabinet Enforcer on 01/07/2021 16:41:52

br01/07/2021 16:55:32
697 forum posts
3 photos

Just checked and ours is the Husqvarna 535iRX7 .

Cost us best part of £1000 with batteries and frankly we find battery life is a PITA.

My neighbour has a agriculturaal business and sells them

STHIL petrol driven is his recommendation .

bill

Robert Butler01/07/2021 17:05:07
284 forum posts
6 photos

Michael, I am surprised you are suffering from poor carburetors and weak sparks. I have an EFCO Strimmer, Pole Hedgecutter and Blower which I service every January/February along with the mowers. One issue which I have encountered which is a great cause of annoyance is modern fuels which "go off" very quickly and gum up the carburetor and tank. Many years ago I discovered the efficacy of mixing fuel stabilizer with the fuel on the day of purchase. This can be purchased from garden machinery suppliers (rather than the Sheds) and I can confirm fuel will be fine for up to 2 years.

The strimmer's and mowers range from 15 - 30 years and as proof of reliable starting I have yet to replace a starter cord - well until I've just added this posting at any rate. They last because of reliable starting.

Robert Butler

 

Edited By Robert Butler on 01/07/2021 17:14:17

Edited By Robert Butler on 01/07/2021 17:15:08

Tony Pratt 101/07/2021 17:07:46
1648 forum posts
8 photos

Yes modern petrol is a right PITA as far as rotavators & strimmers are concerned.

Tony

Robert Butler01/07/2021 17:16:17
284 forum posts
6 photos

Not if you use fuel stabilizer

Robert Butler

br01/07/2021 17:16:51
697 forum posts
3 photos

Rober Butler

Most interesting post and never heard of fuel stabiliser but a quick google just confirms what you said.

Always something new to learn on this forum

Fuel stabilizers keep fuel fresh and effective for at least two years of storage time. ... Old fuel can also leave gummy deposits behind in sensitive areas of the motor. The bottom line is trouble, unless you let a fuel stabilizer prevent it. This stuff really works.

bill

Robert Butler01/07/2021 17:20:58
284 forum posts
6 photos

Dear Bill, yes used it for many years. I can't be doing with things that don't work. Makes you wonder what I saw in Er in Doors! In fact she's the only thing in the house that doesn't work!

 

Robert

Edited By Robert Butler on 01/07/2021 17:25:41

Bo'sun01/07/2021 17:32:43
496 forum posts

Hi Michael,

Here's my two pennyworth. I would have a look at ECHO products and "Aspen 2" 2 stroke alkylate fuel. It's ready mixed, ethanol free, has a long shelf life and it's better for the operator. Warning though, Aspen 2 isn't cheap.

I'd look for a model with a gearbox and a straight shaft, rather than the bent shaft variety.

If you want to do bramble bashing with a mulching/shredding blade, make sure the brush cutter warranty will be OK with it.

duncan webster01/07/2021 18:01:11
3456 forum posts
63 photos

I've got a Bosch electric, biggest heap of junk I've ever bought

noel shelley01/07/2021 18:35:02
720 forum posts
19 photos

Try TANAKA, not cheap, a contractors machine, uses 3mm square cord. If the starter is on the left of the engine I would not buy, it's an overhung crank. Starter must be on the Right. Correct fuel mix is vital and new , not last years. ! Good luck, Noel

Nicholas Farr01/07/2021 18:36:49
avatar
2962 forum posts
1335 photos

Hi, I've got one of these Titan TT530GBC and is the best one I've had, but the only problem it's had, is the air filter and clip on cover doesn't stay on, but it's been working without it for at least three years.

Regards Nick.

MichaelR01/07/2021 18:48:15
avatar
442 forum posts
82 photos

I have a Honda Strimmer Brush Cutter a 4 Stroke OHV never missed a beat had one new plug in 5years I change the oil regularly not cheap but worth the price.

Mike.

old mart01/07/2021 18:53:07
3316 forum posts
203 photos

For a strimmer, be sure to get one that advances the line/s automatically when you tap the head on the ground. I ditched the posh one and went back to Black & Decker because of this .

not done it yet01/07/2021 19:25:39
6280 forum posts
20 photos

I’m in agreement with MichealR. Bought one new - really expensive compared to the two strokes - and has given no trouble at all. Not over-worked but just keeps going. In fact, I bought another - a second hand one at an auction - because I fancied the twin handled type to compare with the ‘hoop’ type. I now tend to leave the (expensive) chain saw attachment on one and the strimmer/brush cutter head on the other. Now over-kill, ‘cos we gave up the 3000m^2 patch (we rented) last year.

I bought a large reel of square nylon strim which lasts well but needs winding on carefully for auto feeding.

Both are straight shaft machines - I would not entertain a bent shaft machine. I have two-stroke machines - cheaper generators and pumps, post hole borer and the Mantis cultivator (a good machine, but I wish I had bought a 4 stroke variant). Messing about with two stroke oil is a pain. Apart from the power to weight ratio, I prefer 4 stroke engines any, and every, day of the week.

Edited By not done it yet on 01/07/2021 19:27:29

Meunier01/07/2021 19:27:31
448 forum posts
8 photos

+1 for Echo products. Have a brushcutter with Oregon head and alligator blades. Works well with Handlebars, starts 1st time every time (de-compressor button ) Invested 49GBP in a Husquvarna body harness, no more bruised hips or sore shoulders. Also Echo 22ins chain-saw, just as dependable.
DaveD

Michael Gilligan01/07/2021 19:58:54
avatar
18734 forum posts
916 photos

Thanks for all the comments so far yes

I will just respond briefly on three points for now:

  • I was assuming that an electric machine would need to be mains [or preferably 110V for safety] to get enough power and duration … I may, of course be wrong.
  • I bought the Stihl, together with a small chainsaw, on ‘brand reputation’ … the saw is quite good, but the strimmer was mediocre at best. I believe only the top end of their range merits the reputation.
  • Robert says “The strimmer's and mowers range from 15 - 30 years” … and I think that may be my problem [they don’t make ‘em like they used-to]

I look forward to any more advice … I may still have a few weeks before the brambles take over !!

MichaelG.

pgk pgk01/07/2021 20:10:04
2298 forum posts
293 photos

I use a big Husqvarna strimmer with handlebars and a harness and I have a lot of edges, ditch edges and stuff to do with it
It was old when i bought it with this farm 10years ago and still starts easily and I’m pretty sloppy about leaving the end of season fuel in it over winter etc.
But it is heavy and a rare day i can use it through a full tank..

If your brambles are on a flat then I’d barge through them with a small front deck ride on but steep and inaccessible means manual or spray it.

Biggest issue with the husky is if I run it full chat - tends to snap strimmer line a lot more often than slower speeds and I’ve got the heaviest stuff you can shove in it.
 

Re cordless garden stuff; I've a lidl hedge trimmer and whilst it runs slower than a 2-stroke the quality of the cutter blades is superb 30yards of privet top and both sides and 1/2 the battery pack still usable. On the other hand i have a battery pole saw with skip chain that’s pants compared to my Stihl - but then the Stihl is a muscle mans machine on full height. so the battery job gets used for one-off and small branches

pgk

Edited By pgk pgk on 01/07/2021 20:17:05

All Topics | Latest Posts

Please login to post a reply.

Magazine Locator

Want the latest issue of Model Engineer or Model Engineers' Workshop? Use our magazine locator links to find your nearest stockist!

Find Model Engineer & Model Engineers' Workshop

Latest Forum Posts
Support Our Partners
JD Metals
Warco
rapid Direct
emcomachinetools
walker midge
cowells
Eccentric July 5 2018
Dreweatts
Eccentric Engineering
Subscription Offer

Latest "For Sale" Ads
Latest "Wanted" Ads
Get In Touch!

Do you want to contact the Model Engineer and Model Engineers' Workshop team?

You can contact us by phone, mail or email about the magazines including becoming a contributor, submitting reader's letters or making queries about articles. You can also get in touch about this website, advertising or other general issues.

Click THIS LINK for full contact details.

For subscription issues please see THIS LINK.

Digital Back Issues

Social Media online

'Like' us on Facebook
Follow us on Facebook

Follow us on Twitter
 Twitter Logo

Pin us on Pinterest