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New here, just bought myself a Myford ML10 :)!

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Redsetter18/06/2021 20:45:15
181 forum posts
3 photos
Posted by Higgins1994 on 18/06/2021 12:50:15:

im just begining to make a leadscrew clutch today, the only thing ive noticed that i am slightly worried about is that there seems to be oil leaking from around the base of the oil cups. im not sure if their standard as there much bigger than they look in the factory photos on lathes.co.uk. i top them up before every use and check them often and they dont seem to go down particularly fast but there does seem to be a lot of oil on the headstock around their bases im assuming this isnt normal so going to wip them off to take a look later today.

From what ive read it would require modification to the belt guard but im thinking of fitting drip feeders, are they worth the effort fitting?

I have oversize oil cups on mine with wick feeds, and this works fine. No real advantage in drip feeds, you will not be working continuously, they are quite bulky and fragile, and some of the readily available imported ones do not work properly anyway. The plain headstock bearings are considered to be long-lived and should rarely if ever need adjustment. Don't forget the oil point on the countershaft.

Apart from the leadscrew clutch, I think it is worth adding a carriage stop and/or a graduated handwheel for the leadscrew.

Clive Hartland18/06/2021 22:06:07
avatar
2688 forum posts
40 photos

I have found the graduated drum on the lead screw very useful.

I do recommend you fit one. It's use makes cutting to length very easy. In use i face off the work and then set the graduated drum to Zero, all traverse work done from that setting.

Higgins199418/06/2021 23:20:14
24 forum posts

hi thanks good to be here its great to hear so many good accounts of them

ah good good i was worried that if its escaping/leaking the bearings will be running dry but tbh ive been running it on and off for most of the day and i reckon it would have worn out or seized if they had haha.

since seeing what can happen as with my old Zyto the headstock bearings are my biggest worry so i am very OCD about keeping all the oil cups topped up including the countershaft and motor

the cups that are on it are about 15-17mm diameter and have a wick down in the bottom

Higgins199419/06/2021 12:05:19
24 forum posts

ah ok i may as well stick to the setup ive got then and try and seal them a bit better, as long as i know their getting oil to the bearings i shall rest easy ill have a look around for a dial for the leadscrew that is a good shout, myford have them but they are not resettable

Redsetter19/06/2021 13:11:12
181 forum posts
3 photos
Posted by Higgins1994 on 19/06/2021 12:05:19:

ah ok i may as well stick to the setup ive got then and try and seal them a bit better, as long as i know their getting oil to the bearings i shall rest easy ill have a look around for a dial for the leadscrew that is a good shout, myford have them but they are not resettable

It is not difficult to make a leadscrew dial.

Mine is turned from an aluminium blank about 3/4" thick and bored to be a loose fit over the shaft of the leadscrew handle. Fitted between the shaft and the dial is a wide, C section collar of springy brass, rather like a very wide piston ring, which provides a friction drive to allow for resetting. Then you need to devise a suitable reference mark on the leadscrew bearing housing.

There are various ways of putting the graduations on if you don't want to engrave them, if you use a pre-printed scale you have to make the diameter of the dial to suit. It is, though, quite useful even with only one line for "zero" because often that is all you really need to know.

Howard Lewis19/06/2021 13:18:03
5036 forum posts
13 photos

Made na Leadscrew dial for my ML7, from a picador handwheel.

Skimmed the OD to produce a flat surface. Smuggled into work on a Saturday morning, and spent the time in Standardsn Room with a Height Gauge, on the optical dividing head, scribing 125 lines onto the flat surface.

(8 tpi Leadcsrew )

Bolted a bit if flat plate onto the rear Leadscrew bearing housing to act as a datum.

Something similar can be arranged, no doubt for mthe ML10

Howard

ega19/06/2021 15:22:59
2186 forum posts
179 photos

The Super 7 has a leadscrew dial as standard which I find useful but it would be better still if the dial were re-settable.

Hemingway Kits have a design for thrust bearings for the leadscrew which incorporates re-setting via a pinch screw; has anyone experience of this?

derek hall 119/06/2021 16:29:18
161 forum posts

I fitted the Hemingway upgrade to the leadscrew dial on my Myford S7 some years ago. It's an easy and useful upgrade but I find the resetting pinch screw always seems to end up in the opposite side to the user I.e. in the most inaccessible position!

Regards

Derek

Higgins199419/06/2021 19:46:48
24 forum posts

that sounds like a plan redsetter will definatly be giving that a go, in the box of stuff that came with the lathe was a kind of make shift indexing device - basically a 3 jaw chuck mounted on a gear with a tapered bolt that can be tightened between each tooth as its rotated, may be of some use to scribe some incriments around

ive been drilling through my leadscrew clutch today but unfortunatly i dont have much in the way of drills over 13mm :/ the closest i can get is 15.9mm then the next up would be 16.20, would this be a bit too much clearence on the leadscrew or could i get away with it :/?

ega19/06/2021 21:25:38
2186 forum posts
179 photos
Posted by derek hall 1 on 19/06/2021 16:29:18:

I fitted the Hemingway upgrade to the leadscrew dial on my Myford S7 some years ago. It's an easy and useful upgrade but I find the resetting pinch screw always seems to end up in the opposite side to the user I.e. in the most inaccessible position!

Regards

Derek

Thanks for this very interesting point. I will ponder on how the difficulty might be overcome.

My reason for mentioning this modification (which seems applicable in principle to the ML10) was that I had some doubts over the ability of the pinch screw to withstand the torque from the rotation of the handle without slipping.

Redsetter19/06/2021 21:36:50
181 forum posts
3 photos
Posted by Higgins1994 on 19/06/2021 19:46:48:

that sounds like a plan redsetter will definatly be giving that a go, in the box of stuff that came with the lathe was a kind of make shift indexing device - basically a 3 jaw chuck mounted on a gear with a tapered bolt that can be tightened between each tooth as its rotated, may be of some use to scribe some incriments around

ive been drilling through my leadscrew clutch today but unfortunatly i dont have much in the way of drills over 13mm :/ the closest i can get is 15.9mm then the next up would be 16.20, would this be a bit too much clearence on the leadscrew or could i get away with it :/?

The leadscrew is 5/8" o.d. so around 15.875mm. Drills tend to cut oversize anyway - strictly speaking it ought to be reamed to the final size - but I should think you would get away with a 15.9 drill if you have no alternative.

When I made my leadscrew clutch I bored the sleeve oversize and put in some Oilite bushes.

 

 

Edited By Redsetter on 19/06/2021 21:37:43

Redsetter20/06/2021 10:13:44
181 forum posts
3 photos

Joshua,

Not the best photos but these may be of interest.

Leadscrew dial - With an 8tpi leadscrew 1 revolution = 125 thou, so I made the circumference of the dial 125mm and used a section cut from a thin steel rule as the scale, so 1mm on dial = 1 thou. It is accurate enough, and works for me.p1010007 (2).jpg

Clutch - the lever obviously is Myford, otherwise from scratch. The lever pivot is mounted on a length of steel angle, shaped to a close fit with the bed and retained adequately by just one holding-down bolt. The lever isn't essential as the clutch should only be moved when stationary. Carriage stop mounted on the RH end of the angle piece - this is another easy thing to make and very useful.p1010009 (2).jpg

Top slide/toolpost - this was missing from the lathe when I bought it, so I adapted a Mini - lathe assembly. This needed quite a bit of modification but works well and cost very little. p1010007 (3).jpg

Engine Builder20/06/2021 17:12:56
avatar
235 forum posts

A very useful mod is a clutch on the spindle. I made mine years ago from detilas published in Model Engineer.

You can see it around 1:10 time scale in this video.

Higgins199424/06/2021 22:14:53
24 forum posts

finally got round to fitting my leadscrew clutch today after drilling out to 15.9 it was still to small so i ended up modifying my boring bar to fit and shaved off a thou at a time till it was a good fit, made a floating die holder to put a 1/4" thread on a couple of studs and got it all together. it all operated very smoothly im quite chuffed!

your photos arent working unfortunatly redsetter :/ shame as im interestedto see your leadscrew dial, i had in my head to weld up a bracket perpendicular to the diy indexting device that came with the lathe so i could scribe each incriment around the edge but the sprocket is only 72 tooth which would work out at 1.73 thou per incriment so not ideal haha :/

the spindle clutch is an interesting one, why is that an advantage :/? surely it is best to minimize the time that the motor is running? it seems that turning it on and off is just as fast as engaging/disengaging. is there a surge when starting/stopping motor that is best avoided or something?

so far i have been running it without any change gears on it, im going to put them on tomorrow so i can use the clutch/ power the leadscrew but according to the manual that means i have to topup the oil nipple on the side of one of the headstock pulleys, how could one keep this lubricated without a myford (or any) oil gun? where does it go from this nipple as its only to lubricate the change gears so cannot figure out how that works haha :/

Howard Lewis24/06/2021 23:23:45
5036 forum posts
13 photos

I think that the idea behind a clutch between motor and lathe is so that the motor is spared repeated starts.

Single phase motors, in particular do not like being started frequently. The heavy current draw on start up generates heat, so frequent starts cause the heat to build up.

Shouldn't be too much of a problem with normal use, and a low load factor.

Howard

Redsetter25/06/2021 00:29:46
181 forum posts
3 photos

Joshua, I'll reload the photos here.p1010007 (2).jpgp1010009 (2).jpgp1010003 (1).jpg

Hope that helps.

As Howard says a clutch on the motor isn't really necessary for our sort of use, but is a nice luxury, although a little difficult to arrange on the ML10 because of the countershaft design.

Edited By Redsetter on 25/06/2021 00:30:50

Edited By Redsetter on 25/06/2021 00:32:33

Redsetter25/06/2021 07:38:54
181 forum posts
3 photos

 

so far i have been running it without any change gears on it, im going to put them on tomorrow so i can use the clutch/ power the leadscrew but according to the manual that means i have to topup the oil nipple on the side of one of the headstock pulleys, how could one keep this lubricated without a myford (or any) oil gun? where does it go from this nipple as its only to lubricate the change gears so cannot figure out how that works haha :/

The oil nipple on the headstock pulley is to lubricate the pulley bearings while the back gear is in use, as distinct from the change gears which drive the leadscrew. With the back gear engaged (remembering to disconnect the bull wheel) the pulley rotates on the headstock spindle.

Going back to the leadscrew dial you could possibly index it using the 65 tooth bull wheel, which would give you 5 thou increments which would be quite useful and wouldn't take too long. 

Edited By Redsetter on 25/06/2021 07:57:04

Higgins199425/06/2021 09:10:33
24 forum posts

ah that makes a lot more sense ill be very honest i thought they were the same thing (back/change gears) shows how much i have to learn still haha

i like the dial defo on my todo list, i presume you made the brass shim then bored the dial a bit at a time untill you got a good fit or did you work to a specific clearance?

Higgins199425/06/2021 09:13:46
24 forum posts

going back to the subject of oilers i just found this, wouldnt mind making a set at some point .....

homemade wick feed oilers

im sure others will know about his channel already but theres some great vids

Redsetter25/06/2021 09:28:23
181 forum posts
3 photos
Posted by Higgins1994 on 25/06/2021 09:10:33:

ah that makes a lot more sense ill be very honest i thought they were the same thing (back/change gears) shows how much i have to learn still haha

i like the dial defo on my todo list, i presume you made the brass shim then bored the dial a bit at a time untill you got a good fit or did you work to a specific clearance?

I can't remember exactly, but yes, basically just made it to fit.

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