By continuing to use this site, you agree to our use of cookies. Find out more
Forum sponsored by:
Forum sponsored by Allendale Jan 24th

Air tools

All Topics | Latest Posts

Search for:  in Thread Title in  
Stephen Follows07/06/2021 15:51:12
avatar
69 forum posts
3 photos

Can anyone recommend a decent 1/4" chuck/mandrel air tool please?

I want some thing straight, i.e. not 90 degree, reasonably easy to hold one handed. The one I currently use is from Machine Mart, very chunky to hold and use and drains the compressor rapidly, (despite being advertised as 6 cfm).

I have a 50 litre, 9 cfm compressor. I don't expect continuous industrial use but don't want to be stopping every couple of minutes for the compressor to refill.

not done it yet07/06/2021 17:00:45
6078 forum posts
20 photos

I expect that if the compressor was from machine mart (or lots of cheap chinese brands) it is quoted as ‘Air Displacement’, not Free Air Delivery - whereas the tool usage will be the absolute best ‘air delivered’ when new, and likely rounded down to the nearest unit. There can be a huge difference between AD and FAD. It’s called efficiency.

Hence it is likely your compressor was never really enough for the duty. Should have bought a bigger compressor.

I looked for a decent axial air tool with low rpm, but failed to find anything suitable. Check out die grinders if high speed is required.

Nick Clarke 307/06/2021 17:27:15
avatar
1221 forum posts
49 photos
Posted by not done it yet on 07/06/2021 17:00:45:

I expect that if the compressor was from machine mart (or lots of cheap chinese brands) it is quoted as ‘Air Displacement’, not Free Air Delivery - whereas the tool usage will be the absolute best ‘air delivered’ when new, and likely rounded down to the nearest unit. There can be a huge difference between AD and FAD. It’s called efficiency.

Hence it is likely your compressor was never really enough for the duty. Should have bought a bigger compressor.

I looked for a decent axial air tool with low rpm, but failed to find anything suitable. Check out die grinders if high speed is required.

Sadly +1 I'm afraid

Dave Halford07/06/2021 17:47:28
1590 forum posts
16 photos

Anything running on a 2hp or 2.5hp motor will only deliver 5.5cfm, most of the MM die grinders use 4 or 6cfm off load and 16cfm under load.

This one might do from Cromwell, but you would be better considering something electrical, more Dremel sized and not a Chinese low price knock off.

noel shelley07/06/2021 18:33:23
635 forum posts
18 photos

Unless you have an industrial sized compressor forget air tools unless you are prepared to wait they are not going to work very well. Noel.

Steviegtr07/06/2021 21:55:48
avatar
2141 forum posts
299 photos

I have quite a lot of air tools. My compressor is a large 150 litre. 14 cfm. The air tools push the compressor to the limit. So i do not think any air tools would be suitable for your needs. As already said by most comments posted.

Steve.

old mart07/06/2021 22:52:54
3185 forum posts
201 photos

Toolstation have a Draper air die grinder with 1/8 and 1/4 inch collets which is supposed to use 4 cubic feet per minute at 90 psi. Whatever you can find, make sure it has a rubber sleeve on the outside, not bare metal, they get very cold, hand held. I have my doubts whether an air tool would use less than 4 cuft/min.

If you had an adjustable valve between the compressor and the tool to run it at a lower speed, there might be a setting that was usable for you.

 

Edited By old mart on 07/06/2021 22:57:59

not done it yet08/06/2021 08:42:07
6078 forum posts
20 photos

The only ‘adjustable valve’ would be a lower air operating pressure - so by reducing the pressure regulator.

Regarding the rubber cover, rubber gloves are available, as an option. I envisaged the OP was likely wanting something in the lower speed range as he mentioned a chucked option - nearly all die grinders employ collets rather than a common chuck.

Dave Halford08/06/2021 10:28:08
1590 forum posts
16 photos
Posted by old mart on 07/06/2021 22:52:54:

Toolstation have a Draper air die grinder with 1/8 and 1/4 inch collets which is supposed to use 4 cubic feet per minute at 90 psi. Whatever you can find, make sure it has a rubber sleeve on the outside, not bare metal, they get very cold, hand held. I have my doubts whether an air tool would use less than 4 cuft/min.

If you had an adjustable valve between the compressor and the tool to run it at a lower speed, there might be a setting that was usable for you.

Edited By old mart on 07/06/2021 22:57:59

Note also that the minimum hose bore is 10mm so that tells you 4cfm is fudged

martin haysom08/06/2021 12:59:34
avatar
27 forum posts

all my air tools say they need 4cuft/min yet my compressor a laycock lx which should be 10cuft/min can't keep up with them

not done it yet08/06/2021 14:48:38
6078 forum posts
20 photos
Posted by martin haysom on 08/06/2021 12:59:34:

all my air tools say they need 4cuft/min yet my compressor a laycock lx which should be 10cuft/min can't keep up with them

Martin,

The only ‘close’ info I could find on the net was this (it may not be your machine) is reproduced here:

“LAVCOCK ENGINEERING LTD. Archer Road, Millhouses, Sheffield 8 TN Laycock's single-stage range and suitable for tyre inflation is the LX/2 portable compressor, mounted on a tabular frame with 7.5 in. rubber-tyred wheels. Its 2.5 Cu. ft. unit gives an air delivery of 1.1 c.f.m.

The LX/3 vertical compressor is fully automatic with a pressure switch cutting out at 150 p.s.i. and cutting in at 125 p.s.i. A directcoupled 5 h.p. electric motor drives the 2.5 cu. ft. unit which has a large after-cooler and condensate trap.

Four models arc listed in the vertical range, LX/5V having a displacement of 5 c.f.m. and a working pressure of 150 p.s.i. The other three models, LX/9V, LX/15V and LX/20V have working pressures of 200 p.s.i. Displacement in c.f.m. is denoted by the model number.

In the horizontal range, six models are available prefixed by LX 5, 10, 15, 20, 35, 42, the numbers denoting the displacement in c.f.m.”

If this is the range, what number is the suffix on yours?

Dave Halford08/06/2021 15:22:45
1590 forum posts
16 photos

Or this one , which ticks the boxes

Edited By Dave Halford on 08/06/2021 15:24:00

not done it yet08/06/2021 19:29:24
6078 forum posts
20 photos
Posted by Dave Halford on 08/06/2021 15:22:45:

Or this one , which ticks the boxes

Edited By Dave Halford on 08/06/2021 15:24:00

Saw that one. Not a lot any help, really.

John Reese13/06/2021 23:53:26
945 forum posts

Consider an electric die grinder. I only uses 1/2 hp while a pneumatic tool is going to draw the full 2.5 hp of your compressor. Pneumatic is very inefficient.

Stephen Follows14/06/2021 20:46:17
avatar
69 forum posts
3 photos

Thanks everyone. The reason for wanting to use air is that I have had problems with electric. I had one from a large DIY chain, cost £30. Burnt out after 13 months with little use. Bought a Dremel, switch burnt out after three months. The replacement lasted long enough to get out of guarantee. If Dremel are unreliable, what hope cheaper makes. By the way, they didn’t get hammered, only light work.

Nicholas Wheeler 114/06/2021 21:02:45
642 forum posts
46 photos

Stephen, Dremels are tools that really ought to be sold from market stalls by a salesman whose pitch is carefully developed to show how perfect they are for tattooing mouse ears. And he'll throw in not one, not two, but nine extra motor brushes!

An electric die grinder is going to cost over £100 and will come with 6mm collets for tools. It will also be about 5 times more powerful than a Dremel.

I have to agree with the above posters who suggest that air tools(except for sprayguns) are only useful if you have a massive, permanently installed compressor. I would also add that it helps if you're already deaf and immune to the bloody things icing up

Stephen Follows16/06/2021 17:04:50
avatar
69 forum posts
3 photos

Which electric tool is good then? I’ve looked at a Mikita, over £100 but still had some bad reviews.

Nicholas Wheeler 116/06/2021 17:45:38
642 forum posts
46 photos
Posted by Stephen Follows on 16/06/2021 17:04:50:

Which electric tool is good then? I’ve looked at a Mikita, over £100 but still had some bad reviews.

I'm happy with my Draper DG528 electric die grinder, having ported several cylinder heads with it and ground lots of welds. But I've had it over twenty years, and it doesn't seem to be available now.

Steviegtr16/06/2021 18:14:43
avatar
2141 forum posts
299 photos

Stephen, i commented earlier in this thread , but omited to say. Using a die grinder or any air tool can be ran from any compressor. It is the time thing. Example. I used one & other air tools to mirror polish a Suzuki motorcycle frame & swing arm. I was using the tools all day long. The compressor was pretty much flat out all the time. If i had a small job to do then your small compressor may well do the job. Pic shown of mine. US pro tools do one as do Bergen tools. Then the trusty Draper ones. Too many to list. Electric ones i cannot comment . As an aside if you do go the air route you need a good set of ear defenders as they are noisy sods.

Steve.

die grinder.jpg

Edited By Steviegtr on 16/06/2021 18:16:19

Dave Halford16/06/2021 19:15:24
1590 forum posts
16 photos
Posted by not done it yet on 08/06/2021 19:29:24:
Posted by Dave Halford on 08/06/2021 15:22:45:

Or this one , which ticks the boxes

Edited By Dave Halford on 08/06/2021 15:24:00

Saw that one. Not a lot any help, really.

DUH!

Until you read the motor label and see the capacity is 15, which would translate to a good 10 FAD, it's just an LX and looks the right age and size..

It was meant to stop you being so rude to Martin.

All Topics | Latest Posts

Please login to post a reply.

Magazine Locator

Want the latest issue of Model Engineer or Model Engineers' Workshop? Use our magazine locator links to find your nearest stockist!

Find Model Engineer & Model Engineers' Workshop

Latest Forum Posts
Support Our Partners
cowells
Eccentric July 5 2018
emcomachinetools
JD Metals
Warco
ChesterUK
walker midge
Eccentric Engineering
Subscription Offer

Latest "For Sale" Ads
Latest "Wanted" Ads
Get In Touch!

Do you want to contact the Model Engineer and Model Engineers' Workshop team?

You can contact us by phone, mail or email about the magazines including becoming a contributor, submitting reader's letters or making queries about articles. You can also get in touch about this website, advertising or other general issues.

Click THIS LINK for full contact details.

For subscription issues please see THIS LINK.

Digital Back Issues

Social Media online

'Like' us on Facebook
Follow us on Facebook

Follow us on Twitter
 Twitter Logo

Pin us on Pinterest