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45% Silver Solder for Jewelry?

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Blue Heeler14/05/2021 08:17:24
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Can anyone tell me if 45% silver solder is 'safe' for a copper bracelet jewelry repair that will be worn against skin?

Of course common lead solder would be bad, but what makes up the other 55% of a 45% silver brazing stick?

JasonB14/05/2021 08:25:03
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about 30% copper and 24% zinc with a few traces of others.

Blue Heeler14/05/2021 08:27:05
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Posted by JasonB on 14/05/2021 08:25:03:

about 30% copper and 24% zinc with a few traces of others.

Thanks Jason, do you think its ok to use in skin contact?

Paul Lousick14/05/2021 08:27:14
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65% silver solder is often used for jewelery and available in a paste/flux for fine work. Lots of information available on the internet. Do a search.

Paul.

Hopper14/05/2021 08:33:05
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Zinc should be ok. Same stuff as used on galvanised water piping. Ditto copper.

David George 114/05/2021 08:37:18
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Hi the correct silver content for jewelry is higher around 67% but I don't think if you are using it on copper it would make any problem. If in doubt ask Cup Alloys for more details on metal content. I have jewelry solder and if you only want a small amount I could send you some.

David

JasonB14/05/2021 09:26:03
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As Said I don't think you really need "Easy" (67%) jewelry solder on a copper bangle and could even use less silver content for a darker joint line but the down side of both is the need for higher temps to get it to melt.

Edited By JasonB on 14/05/2021 09:27:38

bernard towers14/05/2021 23:52:12
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Of course what you must remember is that although the solder ingredients before use are not necessarily what is left after the joint is made some is burnt off. Best ask Keith Hale about that.

bernard towers14/05/2021 23:52:50
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Of course what you must remember is that although the solder ingredients before use are not necessarily what is left after the joint is made some is burnt off. Best ask Keith Hale about that.

Keith Hale15/05/2021 09:12:32
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There are three different alloys containing 45% silver.

There is a quaternary alloy with copper, zinc and cadmium. Banned in the EU because of a perceived danger caused by licking or sucking jewellery. But banned all the same.

Another quaternary alloy sees the cadmium replaced with a small %ge of tin

Then there is a ternary alloy where the cadmium is simply removed.

Which one are you using? Check your supplier's data sheet.

Personally (and with no medical qualifications whatsoever) I believe that you would come to no harm no matter which one you used.

Of more concern is the ugly and appalling colour match of these alloys on copper. Make it less obvious by the application of a heavy hammer to the thumb 👍

Or use a glue.

Then spray the bracelet with copper paint

Keith

Tim Stevens15/05/2021 16:15:29
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Some people are allergic to jewellery containing Nickel - and this may well be used in hard solders to make the more silver-looking rather than brassy.

And I suspect that people do much more than suck or lick cadmium plated components. For example angle-grinding or welding. Fumes are the worst pollutants.

Cheers, Tim

Edited By Tim Stevens on 15/05/2021 16:17:31

duncan webster15/05/2021 20:27:55
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Copper plate it when you've finished?

Keith Hale16/05/2021 08:50:27
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If you want to make your silver brazing alloy (hard solder) more "silvery" add more silver. See ISO 17672.

In the general scheme of things, the use of nickel bearing silver brazing alloys is not very common. It is used to join ferritic stainless steel components that are subject to crevice corrosion. It is cheaper and more convenient to use austenitic stainless steel.

Under certain circumstances the nickel can improve the "wettability" of the carbide, at the expense of fluidity. The resultant larger fillets / joint thickness may be advantageous with regard to joint strength dependent on the joint design. See also JMM data sheets 1100:122 published June 1973 and 1100:185 published Feb 1976. Other sources are available!

Regards

Keith

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