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Can one buy pliers with parallel jaws that lock like mol

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Martin W30/07/2021 12:38:17
901 forum posts
30 photos

Used to scrounge used burrs and diamond drills from my dentist before his demise. They have come in very useful at times for a variety of projects. Yeah I know 'Off Topic' but pertinent to the posts immediately prior.

Martin

Martin Kyte30/07/2021 12:43:56
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2558 forum posts
45 photos

Especially when you want to get your teeth into a project.

;O)

Martin

Clive Foster30/07/2021 13:08:54
2835 forum posts
103 photos

I shall be taking a very close look at the quality of the LiDL version before plunking down hard cash. My experience is that pliers and similar tools from LiDL can be of vary variable quality.

The LiDL version of the locking long nose pliers that MichaelG likes were so sloppy as to be essentially unusable out of the box. Any attempt to apply pressure let the jaw tips slide sideways so far that they ended up alongside each other rather than gripping. Part of a set with a couple of other locking pliers which were not much better. After making a couple of special punches and judicious application of a Brummagen Screwdriver, large size, followed by skilled squeezing in a vice something approaching useable quality was achieved. Annoying but not a great worry as the one I really wanted was one of the other members of the set. A forked welding clamp Which partly fortuitously and partly by inherent design was acceptable.

As ever I only buy dirt cheap tooling to see if I might actually need what looks to be a potentially useful device. Regular need leads to a good quality replacement being got. The long nose lockers have gotten one outing so far in the four or so years since purchase. Proved that a tool of that style was not right for the job in question so looks like I don't need a good one.

Then there were the sliding joint water pump pliers. Pivot stability is always a bit iffy even in the best examples. Desperate emergency tool for me. The LiDL offerings were so bad that pivot position stability was essentially non-existent. So I bought 4 and will, as the need arises weld in fillers to fix the pivot points. Fixed ones bing far nicer to use. Actual handles and grip bits are fine so £2 odd a pop makes economic sense.

Clive

(who uses about 5% of his tools)

peak430/07/2021 17:19:16
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1485 forum posts
162 photos
Posted by pgk pgk on 30/07/2021 07:15:10:

At Lidl next week:

At Lidl next week...

Which store is that please?
It's not showing up in my local ones.
Thanks

Bill

Martin W30/07/2021 17:37:40
901 forum posts
30 photos

Methinks pgk may have a vested interest in this unique design. That said it is an interesting combination of approaches to solve a problem and must have been relatively difficult to blend these designs into an apparently functional unit. I look forward to developments that may be forthcoming that could solve as yet undiscovered problems.

Martin

'Martin K'

It wasn't so much getting ones teeth into a problem as getting the remains of strangers teeth from the burrs!!!!

pgk pgk30/07/2021 18:12:35
2317 forum posts
293 photos
Posted by peak4 on 30/07/2021 17:19:16:Which store is that please?

It's not showing up in my local ones.
Thanks

Bill

Link to Lidl DIY day

Sunday 8th

pgk

Clive Foster30/07/2021 18:13:27
2835 forum posts
103 photos

Martin

No great difficulty in blending the Crescent style adjustable spanner mechanism with the Mole locking capability.

Essentially the adjuster helix is mounted at right angles to the parallel jaw motion version of the Mole / Vise-Grip et al mechanism. The locking action just shifts the helix along a little so the nut / bolt head / square or whatever is gripped between the jaws. The effect is no different to torquing the adjuster up really really tight. Which is impractical in the real world.

From a constructional viewpoint the main issue is providing sliding surfaces for the moving jaw that restrain it from tilt in both widening and narrowing the spacing directions. Crescent style wrenches generally only provide positive restraint against widening splay. Mostly pretty badly at that. Theoretically the jaws should naturally sit slightly pigeon toed as the wrench is adjusted and move out to dead parallel when its used correctly by nipping the adjuster up as it sits on the nut. If you don't nip the adjuster the jaws are inherently splayed and just get worse under leverage.

The locking plier hybrid just does the nip for you pulling the jaws parallel and stopping the thing falling off the nut or whatever.

For me the most likely use is when needing to hold a semi-accessible nut or bolt head by jamming a spanner against a suitable hard point before going round to the, out of reach, other side to actually operate on things.

Clive

Martin W30/07/2021 18:37:13
901 forum posts
30 photos

blushblush And I thought it was a wind up!!!!

ANDY CAWLEY17/08/2021 10:13:52
185 forum posts
48 photos

**LINK**

here it is‼️

Michael Gilligan17/08/2021 10:29:02
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18925 forum posts
942 photos
Posted by ANDY CAWLEY on 17/08/2021 10:13:52:

**LINK**

here it is‼️

.

Well-found, Andy yes

Here, for convenient reference: **LINK**

https://worldwide.espacenet.com/patent/search?q=pn%3DUS1728282A

MichaelG.

Grindstone Cowboy17/08/2021 10:39:16
708 forum posts
58 photos

Found a copy of this book over the weekend which reminded me of this thread. Didn't buy it, but it's probably got everything (and more) you would want to know about adjustable spanners.

Links to https://www.amazon.co.uk/Adjustable-Spanner-History-Origins-Development/dp/1785000357

Rob

Mick B117/08/2021 13:19:24
2018 forum posts
116 photos

Here's one of the sites selling it:-

**LINK**

Note the name of the site.

laugh

I think it's fairly clear that most early sales at those prices will be more for its coolth than its usefulness...

Clive Foster17/08/2021 13:57:37
2835 forum posts
103 photos

Mick B1

Thanks very much. Not.

Clicking that link meant about 15 minutes of my life that I'll never get back!

But it seems to have answered the "What Happened to the Innovations catalogue" question. Gone online and re-named!

Online is no substitute for the guilty pleasure of opening the plain brown envelope and flipping through the catalogue wondering about the economic validity of tooling up a factory to make something that maybe four people in the whole world would be unintelligent enough to buy. Surely some of the things were just a wind up. Gotta confess I did buy 4 things from Innovations over the years. One very good, one decent enough, one sort of OK and one redefining optimistic!

Clive

Mick B117/08/2021 17:01:06
2018 forum posts
116 photos
Posted by Clive Foster on 17/08/2021 13:57:37:

Mick B1

Thanks very much. Not.

Clicking that link meant about 15 minutes of my life that I'll never get back!

...

Clive

I did warn you with the name of the site!

With that fast, deep--threaded leadscrew, I can see why the sell price has to be so high. The only cheap an' easy way I can imagine to make it would involve mazak diecasting, with exactly the quality you might expect from that ...

laugh

One 'sort of OK' experience with Innovations - in this case their battery recharger - was enough for me.

bernard towers19/08/2021 21:49:46
293 forum posts
84 photos

Look at these Vintage speetog clamps on our favourite auction site.

sparky mike21/08/2021 17:26:10
236 forum posts
55 photos

Forgive me if this tip has been aired, but what about a mole grip style grip with one jaw removed and replaced with one that pivots in the middle, so that an even pressure could be obtained along its length.

Mike.

sparky mike21/08/2021 17:34:09
236 forum posts
55 photos

swivel jaw vice grip.jpg

sparky mike21/08/2021 17:36:32
236 forum posts
55 photos

See above picture. This is for pressing in frets when making guitars, but any shape jaws could be made and fitted to same idea. I have a Facom grip that is similar to above grips. Frets have to be pressed in with even pressure along the length, which the above will do very well, with whatever reasonable pressure you want..

Mike.

Edited By sparky mike on 21/08/2021 17:38:20

peak421/08/2021 22:39:12
avatar
1485 forum posts
162 photos
Posted by Grindstone Cowboy on 17/08/2021 10:39:16:

Found a copy of this book over the weekend which reminded me of this thread. Didn't buy it, but it's probably got everything (and more) you would want to know about adjustable spanners.

Links to https://www.amazon.co.uk/Adjustable-Spanner-History-Origins-Development/dp/1785000357

Rob

Here you go, a nice little video by the same author, who's book is quite interesting.

Bill

John Smith 4723/09/2021 00:12:58
231 forum posts
11 photos
Posted by Mick B1 on 17/08/2021 13:19:24:

Here's one of the sites selling it:-

**LINK**

Note the name of the site.

laugh

I think it's fairly clear that most early sales at those prices will be more for its coolth than its usefulness...





I admire the clever engineering. In particular the way it auto-locks is clever.

BUT
1. It is using 316 stainless steel. That won't be very strong. I'd rather have a hardened forged steel and just look after it to make sure it doesn't rust

2. The 90° angle to the handle isn't ideal.

3. Although it appears to auto-lock, it doesn't actually stay clamped - which was the main thing that I originally specified!

Conclusion
A rather nice office/fidget tool for those with 'more money than sense'. Or possibly the most expensive bottle opener in the world?

J





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