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Can one buy pliers with parallel jaws that lock like mol

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Jeff Dayman11/05/2021 14:16:03
2141 forum posts
45 photos

If there was an actual frequent need or purpose for the tool the OP describes you would likely be able to buy one anywhere. Much like the enormous variety of existing hand tools out there, all of which originated by people actually needing such a tool often. There are usually many ways to do a particular job.

A vise seems suited to the task the OP describes, except they are not as portable as hand tools.

Rather than wish / speculate / use people's time to research rare tools which may not exist, why not improvise or use what is at hand and get on with life?

Steve Skelton 111/05/2021 14:28:41
104 forum posts
3 photos

I have to say that the Stanley mole type spanner is extremely handy and sometimes gives you a spare hand when working on plumbing jobs. Whilst I would not like to exert a huge torque on it it is more than adequate for its job.

It is not a bench vice and could not replace one but it has a place in the toolbox.

Nicholas Farr11/05/2021 14:38:12
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2808 forum posts
1274 photos
Posted by Jeff Dayman on 11/05/2021 14:16:03:

Snip

why not improvise or use what is at hand and get on with life?

Hi Jeff, yes, something I had to do many times during my maintenance years when called out in the middle of the night to a breakdown, with the production manager breathing down your neck. It wasn't any good to say that it would have to wait until morning to go into town a buy a particular tool, rather you would have to butcher one if need be to do the job, even if it was a brand new one. Production always had priority.

Regards Nick.

Tim Stevens11/05/2021 17:12:25
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1430 forum posts

Why not improvise or use what is at hand and get on with life?

Why not indeed? The same question was asked of Hero, Gallileo, Leornado, Cugnot , Newcomen, Watt, and many others. I think they knew why not.

Cheers, Tim

John Smith 4711/05/2021 22:35:17
150 forum posts
5 photos


@Hopper - Everyone has an opinion. However I have learned the hard way that sweeping opinions are very often incorrect. I hope no offence caused.

@Andy Crawley - I think the Stanley looks good. I like that (unlike it near competitors) that it doesn't have even small teeth. From what I can see the user just screws the adjuster to completely close the jaws on your workpiece and then you close the levers. But if so, that's a very different action from mole grips where you can screw it so close that it becomes impossible to clamp the work piece. So how hard does it clamp?

Also have you tried putting a lot of force through it (e.g. on a rusty nut on a bolt)?
==> Do the jaws separate significantly?

@Jeff Dayman - "If there was an actual frequent need or purpose for the tool the OP describes you would likely be able to buy one anywhere."
Another sweeping statement. You may or may not be correct. You are choosing to ignore packaging, promotions, patents & IP, porfolios, materials, quality control, vested interests, brand names, geography... Personally I have often looked for but never seen a tool like the "Stanley Locking Adjustable Wrench" in any shop/store, so my money has not yet been allowed to vote.

@Tim Stephen - Absolutely. I couldn't have put it better myself.

Right now I think the Stanley looks best for my purposes.

J


PS Btw, can any of you work out how this thing works?
I'm pretty sure its of no use to me - some sort of racket mechanism??
But what does the orange button near the jaws actually do?


 

https://www.screwfix.com/p/monument-tools-adjustable-wrench-8-/8096K

Edited By John Smith 47 on 11/05/2021 22:36:26

Edited By John Smith 47 on 11/05/2021 22:37:01

ANDY CAWLEY13/05/2021 06:38:09
184 forum posts
48 photos

Yes I I have used the spanner on very tight nuts. The technique is to wind the jaws in as tight as possible on the thumb screw with the locking mechanism open then apply the locking action, this removes any play that may have been there. I have never used it as a small piece work holding device but it has occurred to me in the past(before this thread started) that it gripped nuts firmly. Typically I use it as a third hand (typically on the underside of a chassis) where it grips a nut and can be left to its own devices whilst I have at the bolt head with two hands. I was recommended the tool by a fellow vintage motorist and I found mine on Amazon by its reference number which is embossed on the handle.

peak413/05/2021 11:27:27
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1407 forum posts
159 photos

Something like the Facom 518A-5 looks like a useful bit of kit.
https://www.primetools.co.uk/product/facom-518a-5-vice-compact-pliers-for-body-work/

Bill

Vic13/05/2021 11:32:10
2781 forum posts
1 photos
Posted by peak4 on 13/05/2021 11:27:27:

Something like the Facom 518A-5 looks like a useful bit of kit.
https://www.primetools.co.uk/product/facom-518a-5-vice-compact-pliers-for-body-work/

Bill

They look really good. I have absolutely no use for them at the moment but I’m thinking about it! laugh

Hopper13/05/2021 11:59:18
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5505 forum posts
137 photos

After all that, a simple Google search for "parallel pliers locking" reveals several pages of choices like the below.

The black ones are even made with flat sided handles specifically for clamping in a larger bench vice while holding small delicate parts to work on.

But of course they might not be as tough as the Stanley shifter for undoing rusty nuts on car chassis etc. It's almost like you need two different tools for those two different jobs.

pliersz.jpg

pliersz2.jpg

I like the look of the black ones and can see a pair in my toolbox in the not distant future. Then again, I like the look of the Facom posted above a lot too.

Edited By Hopper on 13/05/2021 12:00:12

ChrisB13/05/2021 18:20:29
619 forum posts
203 photos

The Knipex parallel jaw pliers are excellent. Rest assured you will not break them with what ever force your hands may apply to them. Besides, if you need to lock them just put a cable tie at the handles and you're done. That piece of aluminium in those jaws will not move. As for clecos, there are lots of different types, some are threaded so you got a positive grip.

20210513_162730.jpg

ANDY CAWLEY13/05/2021 18:48:34
184 forum posts
48 photos


if you turn your head on one side hopefully you will get the picture which is intended to show how much grip is available

76a29845-e8c6-46a8-84ad-e0485a22f29b.jpeg

John Smith 4713/05/2021 23:05:40
150 forum posts
5 photos

@Hopper
- It's pretty clear to me that the black ones are not truly parallel.
- The silver one are parallel but
a) It will take a LOT of winding
b) you wont be able to get it very tight (and if you tried you'd probably strip the thread quite easily)

TBH, I can't quite see how the Facom is really working. I couldn't find an explainer video.


@ChrisB
- You make me laugh out loud. Good to know that they work well, but personally I don't want to faff around with a cable tie every time I want to lock on something.

@Andy
- Made me laugh too!
The Stanley 85-610... I'm on the very brink of buying one... But have you tried shifting a large rusty nut (e.g. 30mm) with it? It would be interesting to know what the point of failure would be.
i.e. Is it any weaker than a conventional adjustable spanner/wrench?

From looking at it would would worry me is that the metal under the [green] arrow might get permanently bent, thereby rending the locking mechanism useless.




OK it's been a long day... please don't flame me for this... but let's have some Photoshop fun with this design.

1. Here is the existing Stanley 85-610 design:



2. Here is what I would have done with it:


The above looks much stronger, no?
Can't see the difference?


3. OK, here is an exaggeration...


==> I think I've taken it too far this time, but you get the general idea. Looks a LOT tougher now, no?

The point of failure probably isn't where I thought. Maybe some pin will shear first... but that was fun to think about.

Should they exist, which version would you buy?

Pete.13/05/2021 23:21:26
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540 forum posts
86 photos

No they shouldn't exist, it's a plumbing tool, if I want heavy duty I'll use a 6 sided hex socket with a 1/2" drive breaker bar.

John Smith 4713/05/2021 23:38:32
150 forum posts
5 photos
Posted by Pete. on 13/05/2021 23:21:26:

No they shouldn't exist, it's a plumbing tool, if I want heavy duty I'll use a 6 sided hex socket with a 1/2" drive breaker bar.

Spoil-sport.

Pete.13/05/2021 23:47:04
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540 forum posts
86 photos

You can make a tool that grips 2 sides of a hex as strong as you like, the nut or bolt head will round off before the tool breaks.

Zeb Flux14/05/2021 05:32:05
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17 forum posts
11 photos

Knipex for the win! They are great for aircraft use, both for turning fasteners and squeezing smaller rivets.

Posted by ChrisB on 13/05/2021 18:20:29:

The Knipex parallel jaw pliers are excellent. Rest assured you will not break them with what ever force your hands may apply to them. Besides, if you need to lock them just put a cable tie at the handles and you're done. That piece of aluminium in those jaws will not move. As for clecos, there are lots of different types, some are threaded so you got a positive grip.

20210513_162730.jpg

ChrisB14/05/2021 05:50:17
619 forum posts
203 photos

The op makes me laugh out loud! Apparently what he needs has not been produced yet and knocks off all ideas given to help him out of his tight spot (what ever it may be as no specific application was mentioned)

Now he appears to want to redesign an existing design fearing he's too strong for the tool and is worried he might break it! That really made me laugh out loud! smile p

ANDY CAWLEY14/05/2021 06:13:34
184 forum posts
48 photos

Never mind a large rusty nut, what I can tell you is that with in the limits of my strength I have not managed to break it. I have used it on a nut of approximately 25mm and applied as much torque as my 100kgs+ will allow without and I have gripped the grippy thing with as much force as my hands will allow. I have not used additional lever arms. The spanner is still fully operational without any signs of headache that often afflicts adjustable spanners. There is probably a good reason they are only 10” long.
By the way the photoshopped images all looked the same to me.
For twenty quid you can have one on your door step to morrow, what are you fussing aboutwink?

Bob Stevenson14/05/2021 07:17:51
514 forum posts
7 photos

".. TBH, I can't quite see how the Facom is really working. I couldn't find an explainer video..."

.........Well without wishing to be unkind THAT is your problem right there!.....if you don't have the imagination and 'gumption' to work it out then you are, frankly, out of your depth on this site, not to mention with the people who inhabit!!

......Meanwhile, someone please pass me that one with the brass lined jaws....I can use that right NOW!!

Hopper14/05/2021 07:25:05
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5505 forum posts
137 photos
Posted by ChrisB on 14/05/2021 05:50:17:

The op makes me laugh out loud! Apparently what he needs has not been produced yet and knocks off all ideas given to help him out of his tight spot (what ever it may be as no specific application was mentioned)

Now he appears to want to redesign an existing design fearing he's too strong for the tool and is worried he might break it! That really made me laugh out loud! smile p

I don't know what kind of training regime one must undertake to develop a wrist strong enough to snap a 10" chrome vanadium shifting spanner, but it must take day and night dedication to get to that level. cheeky

 

Edited By Hopper on 14/05/2021 07:32:50

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