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Ternplate

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MC Black08/03/2021 01:08:21
155 forum posts

I have come across a reference to TERNPLATE in a book first published in forty years ago.

I have not been able to discover exactly what Ternplate is, nor whether it is still available.

A chum suggested asking Mr. Google (who, he assured me, was my friend!) but without success.

What is Ternplate, please?

Is it available in the UK?

If not, is something similar now manufactured under a different name?

I look forward to some light on the subject.

Very many thanks

MC Black

Jon Lawes08/03/2021 01:30:44
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506 forum posts

Do you have any more info to give us a bit of context? Out of interest I did a bit of googling too, as as you say not much is out there other than a mention of it being a type of roofing similar to (or possibly identical to) tinplate.

We used to have a couple of pieces of steel plate called a turnplate or greaseplate which we used to put under the chinook wheel before castoring it 180 degrees; this made it easier to spin the wheel with one person and I guess spared the tyre a little bit too. I suspect this isn't what you are referring to though!

Jeff Dayman08/03/2021 01:37:39
2121 forum posts
45 photos

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Terne

Graham Williams 1108/03/2021 05:26:21
71 forum posts
41 photos

Memory not so good these days but back in the 60s I'm sure we used Terneplate to press Timing Gear Covers for David Brown Tractors, 2 types, Grey in colour, can't remember the gauge exactly but around 18/20 swg EDD sourced from a plant in North Wales in 20 ton minimum lots.

Speedy Builder508/03/2021 06:40:11
2257 forum posts
170 photos

TERNPLATE

 

Terne coated stainless steel roof panels (Terne coating is a a zinc-tin alloy metal coating process that gives extra corrosion resistance. Terne metals produced acccording to US ASTM A308 are expected to contain alloys copper, nickel, chromium, molybdenum, vanadium, titanium, columbium, and boron, at alloy mixes depending on the specific product requirement.

Edited By Speedy Builder5 on 08/03/2021 06:46:09

not done it yet08/03/2021 07:03:44
5776 forum posts
20 photos

but without success.

Worked OK for me. Without the ’e’ comes up half a dozen hits down the list for ‘including terneplate’ on my google.

MC Black08/03/2021 08:11:24
155 forum posts
Posted by Jon Lawes on 08/03/2021 01:30:44:

Do you have any more info to give us a bit of context?

Thank you all for taking the time to respond.

The reference (in a book about building model engines) was that Ternplate was easy to bend and solder and preferable to Tinplate.

With best wishes and thanks again.

MC

Andrew Johnston08/03/2021 09:10:20
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5969 forum posts
667 photos

From "Definitions & Formulae for Students - Metallurgy" published by Pitman in 1942 at 6d!

Terneplates - steel sheets coated with a mixture of tin and lead

Probably not obtainable now due to the lead.

Andrew

Michael Gilligan08/03/2021 09:29:42
avatar
17641 forum posts
810 photos
Posted by Speedy Builder5 on 08/03/2021 06:40:11:

TERNPLATE

Terne coated stainless steel roof panels (Terne coating is a a zinc-tin alloy metal coating process that gives extra corrosion resistance. Terne metals produced acccording to US ASTM A308 are expected to contain alloys copper, nickel, chromium, molybdenum, vanadium, titanium, columbium, and boron, at alloy mixes depending on the specific product requirement.

Edited By Speedy Builder5 on 08/03/2021 06:46:09

.

Interesting to note [now that we know the context of the question] that the text which follows after your quotation is probably of more relevance.

... As per Andrew’s historic reference ; the Lead would be a useful aid to soldering.

MichaelG.

Rod Renshaw08/03/2021 09:32:16
254 forum posts
2 photos

From memory, ternplate was used for the bodies of older Landrovers.

Rod

Andrew Johnston08/03/2021 09:42:27
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5969 forum posts
667 photos
Posted by Rod Renshaw on 08/03/2021 09:32:16:

...was used for the bodies of older Landrovers.

From the same book:

Used for roofing, oil paint and varnish drums and in the motor-car industry.

Andrew

Nigel Graham 208/03/2021 10:15:24
1246 forum posts
17 photos

Rod -

Some may have had steel bodies, but I think most of the Series I - III (and the Defender?) LandRovers' panels were made from Birmabright, not steel but an aluminium-alloy, on a galvanised-steel frame.

I suppose a modern equivalent is Corten Steel, a group of weather-resistant alloys widely used for making shipping-containers, sheds and fences. If not painted, they develop surface rust, but otherwise corrode but much more slowly than ordinary mild-steel.

Rod Renshaw08/03/2021 10:20:00
254 forum posts
2 photos

Nigel,

Yes, now you have said Birmabright, I realise I have misremembered.

Rod

Dave Wootton08/03/2021 10:45:46
148 forum posts
46 photos

I know that for vintage car work where Ternplate was specified coachbuilders now use Zintec sheet, which is I think just mild steel with a zinc coating or plating on it. Seems readily available in large sheets, was given some offcuts and it's lovely stuff to work with, very ductile.

Dave

Solders easily too with Bakers fluid or Fluxite.

Edited By Dave Wootton on 08/03/2021 10:47:44

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