By continuing to use this site, you agree to our use of cookies. Find out more
Forum sponsored by:
Forum sponsored by Allendale Jan 24th

lathe knurling tool

Advice

All Topics | Latest Posts

Search for:  in Thread Title in  
Dale Parsons07/03/2021 16:45:01
4 forum posts

Hello all. Please could you share with me some of your valuable knowledge on this skill, I’ve had a warco 180 delivered and totally new to this, have been watching you tube vids and thought I’d try to make brass handles for the lathe as a start project.

Could someone advise what lathe knurling tool I need to buy as there is so many and ones with more wheels than some

I appreciate you taking the time to help a newcomer to this skill set

kind Rgds

dale

Journeyman07/03/2021 17:09:14
avatar
938 forum posts
172 photos

Basically 3 types (someone will be along soon to tell me I'm wrong).
1. Push in
2. Clamp
3. Cut

For a small lathe such as the WM180 probably better with the Clamp type as it imposes less strain on the bearings. The cut type are good but seethingly expensive. Have a look at this one from ** ArcEuroTrade **

This article on making ** toolmakers clamps ** covers knurling in a bit more detail, about half way down the page.

John

Edited By Journeyman on 07/03/2021 17:16:53

Frances IoM07/03/2021 17:11:31
1065 forum posts
27 photos
the one with two wheels + a sisor like action to adjust to the bar and one that will fit in the tool post - the WM180 doesn't have the power to handle the single wheel type nor is the tool post big enough to take most - I bought mine I think from ARC but WARCO do a similar type but even then needed to mill part of the holding bar to fit the 180.

There are several designs that you can make yourself Warco sell the hardened cutters - there was an interesting design by Jacques Chirac? in one of the mags abt 3 years ago that used non bevelled wheels to cut rather than crush the metal
jon hill 307/03/2021 17:35:40
101 forum posts
18 photos

Why not make one, if you have some stock metals about there is plans for one in Harold Halls 'Lathework a complete coarse'. I think its workshop practice series no 34

There are plenty of other interesting projects in the book too.

Jon

Andy Carruthers07/03/2021 18:58:01
avatar
294 forum posts
23 photos

I bought scissor type and have good results from my WM180, didn't need to mill part of the holding bar though

Recommend starting with soft material to practice on with lubricant, for me knurling is a confidence thing so I start with light clamp then tighten until I achieve the result I am aiming for

An easy begiinners job is to replace the hand-dial knobs, plenty of operations to build confidence, I did mine in brass

Dale Parsons07/03/2021 19:06:26
4 forum posts

Thank you for your replies.

Dale Parsons07/03/2021 19:08:31
4 forum posts

Andy what size brass blanks did you buy / use for the handles.

Andy Carruthers07/03/2021 19:25:10
avatar
294 forum posts
23 photos

I had some brass offcuts lying around so used those, IIRC the handles ended up ~20mm in diameter, much more tactile than the originals not just because of the knurl, but also because of the diameter

Gary Wooding08/03/2021 07:27:39
821 forum posts
211 photos

**THIS** pdf describes a clamp type knurling tool that I designed and made many years ago. It gives full details and dimensions. It works well and I've used it many times.

Hopper08/03/2021 07:55:19
avatar
5379 forum posts
129 photos
Posted by Gary Wooding on 08/03/2021 07:27:39:

**THIS** pdf describes a clamp type knurling tool that I designed and made many years ago. It gives full details and dimensions. It works well and I've used it many times.

That looks like a beauty. The side plates look as though they would stop the problem of the two arms flexing out of line under heavy loading etc. Thanks for posting.

Dale Parsons08/03/2021 09:33:19
4 forum posts

Jon hill 3 thank you for advising on the books I’ve purchased both of them on Amazon,

Andy carruthers looked on eBay for some brass blanks can’t get over how expensive they are, think I’ll be going with aluminium lol.

thanks again for all your post.

bernard towers08/03/2021 09:33:55
138 forum posts
70 photos

Gary, very similar to the MARLCO which industry loved , I made the Hemingway version and have never looked back. Think it’s all down to the large side cheeks.

Michael Gilligan08/03/2021 09:39:29
avatar
17641 forum posts
810 photos
Posted by Gary Wooding on 08/03/2021 07:27:39:

**THIS** pdf describes a clamp type knurling tool that I designed and made many years ago. It gives full details and dimensions. It works well and I've used it many times.

.

Nicely designed, and very clearly presented, Gary ... Thanks for sharing it.

MichaelG.

John Haine08/03/2021 09:51:54
3777 forum posts
220 photos

Just a small point, what do you intend to knurl? If you plan to make new handwheels for the lathe, bear in mind that knurling may be very uncomfortable on the hands after a short while as the surface can be rather sharp. Knurling is ideal for small knobs that aren't often adjusted, but with machine handwheels it can be better to have a smooth polished surface on both the wheel periphery and the handle. A nice rotating handle with minimal play is even nicer.

Nicholas Farr08/03/2021 10:17:54
avatar
2682 forum posts
1248 photos

Hi, I have one similar to Knurling Tool I may have even got my one from them, but it was so long ago I can't remember, however it has worked satisfactory for my needs.

Regards Nick.

Andy Carruthers08/03/2021 10:42:22
avatar
294 forum posts
23 photos

John makes a good point, I recall someone (Hopper?) suggesting to run a file over the finished knurl to take the rough edges off, it has been a while since I made the handles

Hopper08/03/2021 10:52:34
avatar
5379 forum posts
129 photos
Posted by Andy Carruthers on 08/03/2021 10:42:22:

John makes a good point, I recall someone (Hopper?) suggesting to run a file over the finished knurl to take the rough edges off, it has been a while since I made the handles

Indeed it was. Was how apprentice toolmakers were taught to do it back in the ancient days of yore. A 10" flat single-cut mill file was the weapon of choice, used on the finished knurl spun in the lathe. Just enough to knock the sharp points and burrs off the knurls. Should be done as a matter of course on all knurling. Straight knurling works very well on things like cross slide dials and is easier again on the hands, after a touch up with the fine file. If you don't file it, a diamond knurl is basically like a rasp and I reckon you could use it to machine wood.

Likewise I often notice homemade tool posts, cross slides, dividing heads and the like made from chucks of bright mild steel square bar with all the sharp corners left on, just waiting to smash knuckles and hands of the unwary. A few minutes to file a nice radius along each edge where two faces meet makes it all a lot more user-friendly. The bigger the radius, the more user friendly it is. Sharp corners always look half-done to me.

Edited By Hopper on 08/03/2021 10:55:53

John Haine08/03/2021 11:12:47
3777 forum posts
220 photos

And when you say "handles", do you mean the handwheels or the bits that stick out? If the wheels, then they are pretty large diameter and you'd need a very big scissors/clamp type knurl that probably wouldn't fit the lathe! If the stick-out bits, if they already rotate, they don't need knurling.

Howard Lewis08/03/2021 13:35:11
4662 forum posts
10 photos

I have both clamp and push in types. Almost invariably the clamp type is used.

This is equipped to give a diamond knurl.

The push in one is for straight knurls, and is only rarely used, and then in gentle steps, out of regard for the Headstock bearings..

As an Apprentice I was told to use no more than 0.010" ( 0.25 mm) depth., and have always this quite sufficient.

If you overdo things when making adjusting screw, the work can shear off!

Howard

noel shelley08/03/2021 13:59:46
483 forum posts
14 photos

my pictures11 138.jpgI bought this unit awhile ago as part of a load of coventry die headsmy pictures11 136.jpg. It is like a 3jaw chuck but with knurling jaws. Not used it yet and I'm assuming it is production gear and cost many shekels. Any comments on it's use ? Noel

All Topics | Latest Posts

Please login to post a reply.

Magazine Locator

Want the latest issue of Model Engineer or Model Engineers' Workshop? Use our magazine locator links to find your nearest stockist!

Find Model Engineer & Model Engineers' Workshop

Support Our Partners
ChesterUK
emcomachinetools
Warco
Eccentric July 5 2018
JD Metals
cowells
Eccentric Engineering
Subscription Offer

Latest "For Sale" Ads
Latest "Wanted" Ads
Get In Touch!

Do you want to contact the Model Engineer and Model Engineers' Workshop team?

You can contact us by phone, mail or email about the magazines including becoming a contributor, submitting reader's letters or making queries about articles. You can also get in touch about this website, advertising or other general issues.

Click THIS LINK for full contact details.

For subscription issues please see THIS LINK.

Digital Back Issues

Social Media online

'Like' us on Facebook
Follow us on Facebook

Follow us on Twitter
 Twitter Logo

Pin us on Pinterest