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Advice and guidance for arthritic folk

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JimmieS15/02/2021 20:17:47
280 forum posts
1 photos

I have that joy of old age - a good dose of arthritis in both hands which has reached the stage of, on a ‘bad’ day, needing both hands to turn the key in the garage door. As I am probably not the only one in this situation, I thought a thread devoted to providing advice on making workshop life, and life in general, a little easier for folk such as myself, would be much appreciated by many, whatever their individual interest.

Jim

br15/02/2021 20:31:16
869 forum posts
1 photos

Same problem

Last week saw the Myford and the mill disappear down the road as just unable to operate handwheels.Main problemismy thumbs cannot stand any pressure on them.

Kepeping the U3 as nice and light to operate.

Looking forward to helpful advice and comments. There is a THUMBS thread in the tea room I placed recently.

Bill

Michael Gilligan15/02/2021 20:31:17
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19601 forum posts
997 photos

Many years ago [early post-grad work in 1971], we were testing elderly folk for their ability to use various household appliances ... One simple baseline test was the amount of ‘squeeze’ that they could apply with their hands to a bathroom weighing scale.

Some of the results were astonishingly feeble compared with our young hands.

... astonishing until now !!

MichaelG.

gary15/02/2021 20:49:31
135 forum posts
31 photos

manuka honey and apple cider vinegar worked well for my father. cant remember the mix but it was quarter pint a day heated up

IanT15/02/2021 21:27:52
1946 forum posts
194 photos

Hello Jim

I can't offer too much comfort I'm afraid.

Ibuprofen helps (a lot), remembering not to grip things like spanners, screwdrivers and pliers too tightly, not getting cold (e.g. staying in the warm) and lot's of stretching and moving about (e.g. not spending hours hunched over things).

Gloves have been mentioned recently and whilst they are certainly not a good idea when using machinery, they certainly do help at other times when filing and hacksawing for instance - quite apart from helping to keep your hands warm.

Regards,

IanT

Nigel Graham 215/02/2021 23:37:35
1898 forum posts
26 photos

I have a couple of glove-liners made by 'Marigold' (other manufacturers... etc.) intended for wearing inside heavy-duty industrial gloves. They are quite thin and tightly-fitting, and although not intended to be water-proof or stand heavy wear (as that is not their intention), I have used them once or twice to give a little insulation from cold handles.

I have had both knees replaced and one effect is that you cannot kneel fully. Whilst that's not usually a workshop problem - except when searching the floor for that tiny component making a bid for freedom - it is something to consider for driving miniature locomotives or traction-engines. These often make their full-size prototypes seem exemplars of ergonomics.

PatJ16/02/2021 00:29:33
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174 forum posts
145 photos

I got "arthritis" in most of the joints in my body, and was shopping for a wheel chair.

It was too painful to stand, and I could barely use my arms and hands.

The doctors said "well, you are just getting old, nothing we can really do except prescribe a bunch of steroids".

In desperation I researched online, and ran across celiac's disease.

I was a poster child for most of the symptoms.

I was not aware that glutton could cause arthritis symptoms.

I stopped eating all glutton (wheat, rye, barley, and for good measure oats), and within five days, all of my joint pain vanished.

A few years later it started up again, and I was scratching my head.

This time I got off all dairy, and again the pain cleared up completely.

So I am allergic to all dairy products, all glutton products, and even allergic to "glutton-free" products that contain any type of grain.

Beware when the doctor mentions arthritis.

Maybe it is, and maybe it is not.

Perhaps this can save someone the pain I suffered for about a year.

.

Bazyle16/02/2021 01:11:58
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6181 forum posts
222 photos

How about stepper motors on the lathe axes but without the cnc aspect. Just a big electronic handle with maybe a 6in dial so the marks and numbers are huge too that syncs to the stepper. An electronically adjustable stool to sit by the lathe and a camera to a big screen to see the tool cutting.

pgk pgk16/02/2021 08:21:58
2431 forum posts
293 photos
Posted by PatJ on 16/02/2021 00:29:33:

So I am allergic to all dairy products, all glutton products, and even allergic to "glutton-free" products that contain any type of grain.

Beware when the doctor mentions arthritis.

Maybe it is, and maybe it is not.

.

I'll make it clear firstly that I'm not saying you're not allergic to the above but it is an interesting area to explore. Some years ago my Practice went through a spate of seeing young to middle-aged dogs with polyarthritis. In itself it's weird that we saw several cases over a few years and then they became rare again.

Some were easily diagnosed as septic polyarthritis but the majority were determined as immune-mediated/autoimmune within the ability of diagnostic workups available. Those were usually treated with immunosuppressive drugs to control signs and then weaned off. There was an interesting correlation between those cases and the historical use of sulphonamide antibiotics - often many years before. The correlation was so strong that I banned the use of any sulphur based products unless labwork determined it was the only treatment option (as opposed to an economic therapy).

However one has to keep in mind that correlations aren't 'proof'. Because sulphur based products were widely used it may just have been a statistical anomally. In that particular case other workers were finding similar but because of the time delay between past use and signs it wasn't realistic to challenge the patients with more sulphur.

One might assume that our banning of the products was the reason such cases vanished - and pat ourselves on the back for being clever. Howveer there is an (unrelated) condition called feline dysautonomia with really dramatic and pathognominic signs that suddenly appeared in the early 80's, killed a lot of cats and then suddenly became very rare - despite a lot of research no trigger factor was every proven albeit a lot of speculation.

The placebo response is very powerful in people and indeed in owners' perception of their pets (think itls better than it is 'cos they wish it so). Also spontaneous remissions may occur (or remissions due to the removal of a different trigger) such that to really prove an allergy or intolerance (where there isn't a specific test) can take multiple challenge trials to overcome 'chance'

For 'simple' allergies I used to start my clients off by keeping a diary. Wuth luck one could find a clear correlation. One classic was itchy 1-2 days after going to the park if they had cut the grass in the park on the day - try guessing that one! - stilll indeterminate whether grass sap or threshed pollens etc but at least avodiable.

For the really tough cases one had to consider putting pet in a hypoallergenic environment, on hypoallergenic feed and introduce suspect proteins one by one - something few clients would be prepared to go through.

"correlation does not imply causation"

pgk

Simon Williams 316/02/2021 09:08:34
627 forum posts
81 photos

pgk -

A fascinating chance observation about feline dysautonomia

In 1987 or thereabouts we lost two cats to what the vet determined was Key-Gaskel Syndrome. Both were DSH about 3 yrs old. If I've understood you correctly this is the same condition you have described above.

I put it down to overdosing them with an organo-phosphate based flea spray, but your comments lead me to wonder if that was not the explanation.

Whether it was or no, they didn't make it.

If you would like to know more PM me.

Dave Halford16/02/2021 09:19:17
1890 forum posts
22 photos

Jim, electric garage doors

pgk pgk16/02/2021 11:03:10
2431 forum posts
293 photos
Posted by Simon Williams 3 on 16/02/2021 09:08:34:

pgk -

A fascinating chance observation about feline dysautonomia

In 1987 or thereabouts we lost two cats to what the vet determined was Key-Gaskel Syndrome. Both were DSH about 3 yrs old. If I've understood you correctly this is the same condition you have described above.

I put it down to overdosing them with an organo-phosphate based flea spray, but your comments lead me to wonder if that was not the explanation.

Whether it was or no, they didn't make it.

If you would like to know more PM me.

It was a colleague and myself that were one of the first to recognise the signs were all related to the parasympathetic system being compromised and coming up with a tentative therapy with prostigmine (later treatment was with the related bethenacol 'myotonine'  ). Indeed we rang Bristol Uni to discuss it. I felt cheated that it wasn't called the Key-Gaskell-PGK syndrome .
Lots of speculation as to cause from flea treatments to radio-isotopes (the later based on findings that it was rarer in countries without nuclear industries). We saw a lot of cases back then and i even foolishly opened one cat's chest and surgically reshaped it's dilated oesophagus - really brave surgery for 1983 but of no benefit.

pgk

Edited By pgk pgk on 16/02/2021 11:03:44

larry phelan 116/02/2021 11:17:25
1141 forum posts
14 photos

I,m 82, no problem turning handwheels, spanners, or hand tools ect, but the lids on glass jars are another matter !

One would need a hand like a gorilla to deal with them, and dont even mention blister packs !!!!!

Sad to think that you had to let your machines go, I suppose that,s down the road for me when I get old.cheekycheeky

pgk pgk16/02/2021 12:21:26
2431 forum posts
293 photos

There are jar openers designed for those with arthritic hands. I recall buying one for my old mum - should have kept it when she passed as doubtless will need it within a decade...

pgk

pgk pgk16/02/2021 12:40:50
2431 forum posts
293 photos

Just spotted this news item:

Robotic glove

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-edinburgh-east-fife-56071636

pgk

JA16/02/2021 12:46:50
avatar
1282 forum posts
79 photos

I have suffered from carpal tunnel syndrome in the right hand for years. My GP, who like me rides a bike, tells me it is a motorcyclist's complaint. I have lived with it but decided that surgery was need about a year ago, ha ha.

I can operate machinery, ride a bike, open jars etc but handling small items is difficult. The noise from the crushed nerve masks the sense of touch. Small parts that have taken time to make need to be handled carefully. Cheaper parts, like BA nuts and screws, frequently end up on the floor, between the holes in the heavy rubber mat. There is no point in going after them, thay get gathered up during the general cleaning of the workshop.

JA

Dave Halford16/02/2021 14:06:27
1890 forum posts
22 photos
Posted by larry phelan 1 on 16/02/2021 11:17:25:

I,m 82, no problem turning handwheels, spanners, or hand tools ect, but the lids on glass jars are another matter !

One would need a hand like a gorilla to deal with them, and dont even mention blister packs !!!!!

Sad to think that you had to let your machines go, I suppose that,s down the road for me when I get old.cheekycheeky

A good splash of very hot water from the kettle straight on the lid, then immediately undo with a cloth.

J Hancock16/02/2021 14:53:15
799 forum posts

PGK Interesting comments on sulphonamide , my father was nearly killed by them , as used on treating desert sores while fighting Erwin Rommel in '42.

Only saved by the Matron , in the hospital in Alexandria ,secretly telling him not to take the tablets anymore !

I have similar hand/arm problems now but more related to a muscle wasting disease , no cure, no treatment.

J Hancock16/02/2021 14:55:27
799 forum posts

PGK Interesting comments on sulphonamide , my father was nearly killed by them , as used on treating desert sores while fighting Erwin Rommel in '42.

Only saved by the Matron , in the hospital in Alexandria ,secretly telling him not to take the tablets anymore !

I have similar hand/arm problems now but more related to a muscle wasting disease , no cure, no treatment.

herbert punter16/02/2021 15:20:35
128 forum posts
1 photos

There is a great deal of treatments available for rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis. If you think you are suffering from either of them, ask your doctor to refer you to you local hospitals rheumatology clinic.

My father-in-law, aged 87 has had various treatments over the past few years and his rheumatoid arthritis has eased considerably. Many medications intended for cancer treatments have been found beneficial to arthritis patients.

He takes Methotrexate in tablet form and injects himself weekly with Benepali. His knuckles were enormous and now they appear normal and give him no pain.

I have osteoarthritis, one of the treatments is a malaria drug, the name of which I cannot remember which I cannot take because it can make the Vittelliform Macular Dystrophy in both eyes worse.

Bert

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