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Machine corrosion protection

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Paul L29/01/2021 11:09:23
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69 forum posts
24 photos

What do you use to protect the machine guideways, tooling etc in your workshops?

Is just a light coating of oil sufficient or are the more modern solutions (e.g. MetalGuard Ultra) the preferred way to go.

Pete Rimmer29/01/2021 11:30:01
1053 forum posts
69 photos

Paul it all depends on the conditions in your workshop, and outside. I have a good amount of bare cast iron in my workshop and I don't use any surface protection at all becuse the temperature remains fairly stable. If I had an uninsulated roof I expect that I would be in a constant battle with rust.

Bazyle29/01/2021 12:00:21
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6012 forum posts
220 photos

There are a lot of solutions af varying types to meet your particular circumstances. If you use the forum search feature on the front page of the website with a few suitable words you will find loads of suggestions and can take your pick. Never a one stop shop.

Paul L29/01/2021 12:49:26
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69 forum posts
24 photos
Posted by Pete Rimmer on 29/01/2021 11:30:01:

Paul it all depends on the conditions in your workshop, and outside. I have a good amount of bare cast iron in my workshop and I don't use any surface protection at all becuse the temperature remains fairly stable. If I had an uninsulated roof I expect that I would be in a constant battle with rust.

Pete,

I don't really have any rust issues as i regularly wipe everything over with oil. what i was interested to hear was if the new solutions a better option or just 'snake oil'.

 

Edited By Paul L on 29/01/2021 12:52:39

Edited By Paul L on 29/01/2021 12:52:59

Paul L29/01/2021 12:52:23
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69 forum posts
24 photos
Posted by Bazyle on 29/01/2021 12:00:21:

There are a lot of solutions af varying types to meet your particular circumstances. If you use the forum search feature on the front page of the website with a few suitable words you will find loads of suggestions and can take your pick. Never a one stop shop.

Baz,

I'm aware that there are various types but it was there effectiveness compared to wiping over with oil that I was interested in hearing about. I did try the the search function using various terms relating to my interest but nothing was found.

not done it yet29/01/2021 14:49:30
6285 forum posts
20 photos

A dehumidifier is my main line of defence. That and an oily rag.

mechman4829/01/2021 15:16:16
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2933 forum posts
460 photos

I have a well insulated workshop, plus 2 small oil filled rads which I switch on for an hour before I go in... nice & toasty @16*C, which also contributes to keeping moisture down .

George.

SillyOldDuffer29/01/2021 16:21:05
Moderator
7487 forum posts
1658 photos
Posted by Paul L on 29/01/2021 12:52:23:
Posted by Bazyle on 29/01/2021 12:00:21:

There are a lot of solutions af varying types to meet your particular circumstances. ...

Baz,

I'm aware that there are various types but it was there effectiveness compared to wiping over with oil that I was interested in hearing about....

Safe to assume that a product designed to protect against rust will outperform ordinary oils. The protective version won't contain lubricant additives capable of causing damage, for instance some EHP oils attack Copper, others absorb water or Oxygen, or become acid as they age. Conversely protective oils usually contain additives to make them sticky and spreadable like paint, plus wax to be left behind when the oil evaporates. They don't lubricate as well as ordinary oil. Corrosion protective mixes intended for long term storage can leave so much wax it's a pain to get it off. Cosmoline is by far the worst I've come across - the so called Chicken Fat once smeared all over Far Eastern lathes is easy to remove in comparison.

Whether designer products are worth buying depends on the circumstances. If tools go rusty quickly, look to fix condensation, perhaps dehumidify, and then maybe apply a proprietary product as well. I'm lucky: it takes months for rust to appear in my workshop. I just wipe over with ISO32 Hydraulic Oil (which works well against rust), or plain motor oil if I happen to run out of ISO32, or 3in1 in an emergency! Almost any oil is better than none. If I was away for any length of time, I'd certainly apply a guard product and covers.

Dave

Peter Sansom30/01/2021 12:45:44
95 forum posts
2 photos

Lanolin spray, you don't have to remove it to use the machine.

Peter

old mart30/01/2021 15:06:10
3317 forum posts
203 photos

The machines at the museum are in an unheated area and are unused during the lockdown periods. They have nothing more than a wipedown with an oily rag with motor oil on it and there is no trace of rust. Fortunately, the walls of the industrial type building are double skinned and insulated, so the temperature changes are slowed down, which reduces the danger of condensation. If you can insulate well, it will help, even if you cannot heat the workshop.

Martyn Edwards 130/01/2021 16:41:10
24 forum posts
59 photos

I use Scotoiler FS365 (made for motorbikes) just because it's in the garage for my vintage bikes. Simple spray on and wipe over with a rag.

bernard towers30/01/2021 16:54:11
277 forum posts
84 photos

Waste of time using engine oil it absorbs moisture better off using hydraulic oil.

Dave Halford30/01/2021 17:07:34
1682 forum posts
19 photos
Posted by bernard towers on 30/01/2021 16:54:11:

Waste of time using engine oil it absorbs moisture better off using hydraulic oil.

Even Synthetic ?

Howard Lewis30/01/2021 18:09:13
5241 forum posts
13 photos

+1 for good insulation.

In the old uninsulated shop (even smaller ) oil on the Myford used to turn grey as it emulsified, but it got wiped off before it could do any damage.

Having a small shop, during low temperature periods a 60W tubular heater is left on. Air temp seems to stay at about 8 -10'C. At least the steel benches don't feel cold to the touch, and minimal rust problems.

Howard

Robert Atkinson 230/01/2021 19:11:11
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1076 forum posts
20 photos

My preferred product is LPS 3

https://www.techsil.co.uk/lps3-rust-inhibitor-380ml

https://www.techsil.co.uk/media/pdf/TDS/MIPZ50037-tds.pdf

https://www.cromwell.co.uk/shop/lubricants-and-chemicals/general-protection-fluids/3-heavy-duty-rust-inhibitors/f/8711

Safe on all metals, most plastics etc. Not he cheapest but it works. Widely used in the aircraft industry.

Robert G8RPI.

martin haysom30/01/2021 19:14:50
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39 forum posts

i use a dehumidifier and the oil left after the water in the coolant has evaporated cos i am a mucky pup that rarely cleans his machine. no rust issues

Stuart Munro 131/01/2021 11:13:43
108 forum posts

Hi,

I also have woodworking machines where oil should not be used as it can contaminate the wood. i bought (from Axminster) a woodworking machine wax which has no contaminants. Simply apply and polish off - helps the wood slide and protects the cast iron surfaces. So I now use it in appropriate places on metal working machines also.

Nick Clarke 331/01/2021 11:24:48
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1247 forum posts
49 photos

I have a query on the opposite problem - my machinery doesn't rust in an integral garage (in Birmingham UK) which I have to share with a freezer, washing machine and tumble drier.

The metal up-and-over door means it is cold in the winter, not least because the drive leading up to it slopes down at one side for drainage. This means that, apart from all of the other gaps around the door there is a gap of over an inch there allowing cold air (and mice, or what the cats call lunch) to get in.

I have a large draught excluder coming next week to fit along the bottom of the door and intend to insulate the inside of the door with 25mm foam sheet.

My question is that while not perfect this will, I hope, help to keep the temperature of the garage up a bit, but will I then have rusting issues from the domestic appliances?

Bazyle31/01/2021 11:44:35
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6012 forum posts
220 photos

Nick, Presuambly the tumble drier exhausts outside so the problem it poses is that it pulls in replacement air that may be very damp and especially on the days when you are not pre-drying your washing outside because of the weather. The washing machine will have a cupful or two of water in the bottom of the drum hich will progressively evaprate.
Since freezers generally want to be run at an ambient above 8C you might consider arranging the garage to have a section with lathe and freezer partitioned off from the damp stuff and gently warmed by a dehumidifier. Just hannging plastic curtains would be a start which could be folded out of the way when working (note, hanging plastic sheet NOT plastic covers.

As it is dry for a while this morning I'm now off out to treat a few bits of recently cleaned steel bar with my favourite soluton - clear Waxoyle diluted with white spirit so it leaves a very thin hand friendly wax coating a bit tacky to the touch like a postit note. This lasts for years in a workshop storage environment.
For woodworking tools and machine handles that are going to be handled I recommend beeswax furniture polish (not silicone furniture polish of course).

not done it yet31/01/2021 12:42:57
6285 forum posts
20 photos

clear Waxoyle diluted with white spirit

Thanks, Bazyle. That is likely the best option I’ve seen for tools/stock (that does not move). That might allow me to move some of my metal stock outside the workshop.

Do they do coloured waxoyle these days? That could be a plan to differtiate between steel types?

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