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ER32 Boxford - what steel to use?

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Aled Dafis21/01/2021 14:02:14
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14 forum posts

Hi, I'm planning to make an ER32 chuck for my Boxford, would EN8 be a good grade of steel to use? EN3 would be even easier for me to machine but my feeling is that EN8 would result in a better product.

I'm a weekend hobbyist, so it's not going to be used for any kind of production work, just the odd job here and there.

Thanks

Aled

Clive Brown 121/01/2021 14:05:56
610 forum posts
23 photos

All my similar attachments for my Boxford are mild steel, En1A or En3, with no apparent problems I think that you'd really only benefit from En8 only if it was heat-treated. For hobby use that would seem  unnecessary.

Edited By Clive Brown 1 on 21/01/2021 14:09:26

Aled Dafis21/01/2021 14:35:25
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14 forum posts
Posted by Clive Brown 1 on 21/01/2021 14:05:56:

All my similar attachments for my Boxford are mild steel, En1A or En3, with no apparent problems I think that you'd really only benefit from En8 only if it was heat-treated. For hobby use that would seem unnecessary.

Edited By Clive Brown 1 on 21/01/2021 14:09:26

Thanks Clive, that helps a lot to hear that you've had no issues with using EN1A or EN3

Regards

Aled

old mart21/01/2021 15:11:51
2659 forum posts
176 photos

That steel will be perfectly good for hobby use, get a nut and use it for gauging the thread. The nut would not be easy to make due to the eccentric collet holder. There are plenty of drawings on line for the er range of holders.

Aled Dafis21/01/2021 15:49:53
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14 forum posts
Posted by old mart on 21/01/2021 15:11:51:

That steel will be perfectly good for hobby use, get a nut and use it for gauging the thread. The nut would not be easy to make due to the eccentric collet holder. There are plenty of drawings on line for the er range of holders.

Thanks, yes that was my plan, I may as well get the bearing type nut as they're only a few pounds more expensive than the standard version.

Regards

Aled

old mart21/01/2021 16:11:30
2659 forum posts
176 photos

I got one of the bearing type er25 nuts from Rotagrip and it is very nice to use.

Howard Lewis22/01/2021 11:23:40
4397 forum posts
4 photos

Being Idle / Cowardly Choose as you see fit, I buy my Clamp nuts. The ball bearing ones are easier to use, especially in the larger sizes.

The 40 x 1.5 mm thread is straightforward to produce. So is the 16 degree internal taper (8 degree Top Slide offset ).

To finish the taper, I wrap oiled emery tape around a collet and VERY carefully finish the taper., while the lathe runs at lowest speed.

DON'T press hard in case it grabs!

DON'T tell HSE!

So far, I have survived doing this six times!

Howard

Aled Dafis22/01/2021 23:24:47
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14 forum posts

Thanks Howard, I'm planning to be equally idle as regards the nut.

Thanks for the finishing tip, I'll keep that in mind.

Are yours EN1a or EN3? Are they holding up fine?

Aled

Howard Lewis23/01/2021 12:03:34
4397 forum posts
4 photos

Shouild I say Bore da? Mother was Welsh, but I know nothing!

SHOCK HORROR!

My Collet holders have all been made from dog ends from the Toolroom, when I was at work, so grade unknown, but BMS of some sort..

My guilty secret is out.

All of the holders seem to be standing up to use quite well.

The stable, so far is: ER 25 Tailstock Sliding Tap Holder, ER 20 Drill holder for the Cutter Grinder, ER 25 and ER32 Square and Hexagon work holders for Milling (Like Stevenson Blocks, but less refined ), ER 25 and ER 32 Floating Reamer Holders.

The ER32 Floating Reamer Holder uses home made collets, slit from only one end with 1, 2 and 3 MT internal tapers.

The ones seeing most use are the Tap Holder and the Drill Holder.

The only part seeing much relative movement is the thread. The taper bore sees only the slight movement of the collets as they are clamped or unclamped.

HTH

Howard

old mart23/01/2021 15:32:34
2659 forum posts
176 photos

Don't forget, when you bore the taper in the chuck, be sure to set the tool height exactly on the centre line.

Aled Dafis25/01/2021 15:12:14
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14 forum posts

Howard and Old Mart, thank you both, your advice is much appreciated.

Aled

Andrew Tinsley25/01/2021 16:29:10
1283 forum posts

I seem to remember that G H Thomas experimented with varying tool heights when turning Morse Tapers. I think his conclusion was "take the proverbial pinch of salt" about getting the tool height dead centre. .

Having the tool off centre by a few thou, didn't alter the taper within his measurement capability.. I think he said that it was a bit of an old wives tale, passed down from one book / article, to the next.

Andrew

Tony Pratt 125/01/2021 17:00:12
1403 forum posts
6 photos
Posted by Andrew Tinsley on 25/01/2021 16:29:10:

I seem to remember that G H Thomas experimented with varying tool heights when turning Morse Tapers. I think his conclusion was "take the proverbial pinch of salt" about getting the tool height dead centre. .

Having the tool off centre by a few thou, didn't alter the taper within his measurement capability.. I think he said that it was a bit of an old wives tale, passed down from one book / article, to the next.

Andrew

+1 on the reply above quoting G H Thomas, Iv'e got all his excellent books.

Tony

old mart25/01/2021 18:21:55
2659 forum posts
176 photos

I have posted this part of the Smart & Brown model A manual before.

_igp2625.jpg

Andrew Tinsley25/01/2021 19:01:26
1283 forum posts

Hello Old Mart,

What is quoted above is quite correct. What your Smart and Brown extract doesn't say, is how big the convex error is.

GHT did the measurements and showed conclusively that the errors are minute, even if the tool height is out by a fair amount. The Smart and Brown manual is an example of this old chestnut being repeated down the ages with no body bothering to check it in practice.

After reading GHT's comment a few years ago, I repeated his experiment and could not measure any difference in the taper for a tool height error of I think +- 5 thou. It was a long time ago!

Andrew.

old mart25/01/2021 20:00:00
2659 forum posts
176 photos

The height errors when taper turning have a lot to do with the relative diameters of the ends of the taper. If you were turning a taper of 45 degrees from 2" diameter to a point with the tool on centre, the result would be different if the taper was repeated with the tool below, or above the centreline. The error would get bigger as the point was approached. The model A is a high end toolmaking lathe and their recomendations have some meaning.

Andrew Tinsley25/01/2021 20:41:00
1283 forum posts

I suggest that you do the experiment yourself, you might well be surprised at what you find! No point in arguing the toss when you can actually do the taper turning and measure the result,. I did and was very surprised I could not measure any meaningful convex shape. This was on an MT2 taper.

Andrew.

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