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1/16" Taper Pin Reamers

Buy cheap, or expensive?

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Chris V27/11/2020 16:13:09
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I'm looking to buy a 1/16" taper pin reamer. I have found online several non branded at around £10 +P+P +VAT so approx £15, or Sherwood brand at £30.

I was taught as a woodworker to always buy the best tools you can afford, however with such a price difference I'm not so sure.....

I expect they are fairly easy to break, Sherwood branded might last longer if that's the case, but I don't have enough experience with these finer sizes to be clear in my mind.

Which would you buy please?

Chris.

JasonB27/11/2020 16:17:24
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Certainly some Sherwood products have never been near the forest so you may just be paying for the name.

Andrew Johnston27/11/2020 16:27:10
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I bought my small taper pin reamers from Drill Service. The 1/16" reamer is listed at £20. Brand is Trubor; claims to be UK made. Mine have worked fine in steel. I work on the principle that Drill Service supply the professionals and they wouldn't last long selling carp.

Andrew

Chris V27/11/2020 17:00:42
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Great thank you Jason, I knew I had read something on here about Sherwood but could not remember what exactly, now you say that I think it was along those lines....

Thanks Andrew, if they are good enough for you...Iv'e just ordered from them. Nearly £25 with VAT but still less expensive than Sherwood..and if they are made here all the better!

Thanks again

Chris.

old mart27/11/2020 19:16:39
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I used to use them regularly, just use cutting fluid, keep turning, but use very little axial force. It is easy to push too hard and increase the cut rate and the chance of snapping the reamer. The hole should be large enough for the reamer end to enter easily. The imperial reamers should be 1:48 taper and so should the pins, don't use metric pins.

Edited By old mart on 27/11/2020 19:19:15

Chris V27/11/2020 20:01:56
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Thank you Old Mart, good idea, I have been thinking about buying some, for several years now! I tend to just reach for the handy 3 in 1 can which certainly helps when tapping but I forgot when I reamed my first taper pin hole.

Just read a few threads, seems one popular cutting fluid stains some steels and tooling )-:

I see the stuff Arc sell dosen't stain brass which would be good as I use that a fair bit. Then there's Tallow, still readily available on ebay, but I can just see the tub getting full of swarf as tooling gets wiped in prior to cutting.

500ml seems a lot and not in a handy dispenser... liable to get spilled or do you buy smaller bottles from somewhere and decant?

Perhaps I need a few more years to decide, ...any suggestions please?

Chris.

JasonB27/11/2020 20:07:18
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CT-90 or Dormer Super Cut come in bottles with a spout

old mart27/11/2020 20:13:49
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I use CT90, but 3in1 would be better than dry. CT90 is probably intended for steel pipe threads in plumbing.

Bill Dawes27/11/2020 21:08:59
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I can vouch for the fact that it is easy to break this size.

Mine snapped like a carrot, if you feel the slightest resistance free it off and try again.

On this subject what is the right drill size to use for a 1/16 taper reamer, logic told me that it should be the smaller diameter of the taper, this is what i did when I snapped the reamer, if i remember correctly I did the next one using a middle way diameter.

By the way I have some green gunk from years ago that I use for tapping, its called Trefolex. It was the dogs whatsits when I did my apprenticeship 60 years ago.(gulp, really that long ago?)

Bill D.

Hopper28/11/2020 06:32:49
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Posted by Bill Dawes on 27/11/2020 21:08:59:

I can vouch for the fact that it is easy to break this size.

Mine snapped like a carrot, if you feel the slightest resistance free it off and try again.

On this subject what is the right drill size to use for a 1/16 taper reamer, logic told me that it should be the smaller diameter of the taper, this is what i did when I snapped the reamer, if i remember correctly I did the next one using a middle way diameter.

The bigger the hole you drill, the larger diameter part of the reamer you will be using and therefore it will be stronger.

So you can measure up your pin and decide which part of it you want to use and drill to the diameter of the smallest part of the pin you wish to contact the hole, allowing a few thou for fitting. So your intuitive mid-point diameter was probably about right. If it works, go with it!

Yes, I have an ancient tin of Trefolex too, sourced from a garage sale, and seems to be an endless supply. Its good stuff for tapping and reaming.

Edited By Hopper on 28/11/2020 06:34:30

Ramon Wilson28/11/2020 08:34:54
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Trefolux - great stuff indeed but not the sort of thing for a taper reamer laugh

I don't use them very often but have just recently. I don't use them by hand but follow the drilled hole (smallest end dia) using the mill to drive it - very slow speed and feed though. I don't say this is correct but this does keep everything in line and the force vertical . You do need to make sure it's withdrawn and cleared of swarf frequently as loading it will lead to breakages.

It does seem a lot of money for that tiny piece of metal you recieve but it's need's must I'm afraid - one of those things that would be difficult to make yourself!

Regards - Tug

Nigel McBurney 128/11/2020 09:55:34
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Where I was trained it was practice to drive small taper reamers by hand with a tap wrench,and used a similar tallow based lubricant similar to Trefolex, step drilling does help on all sizes of taper reamers,After apprenticeship days I did not use taper reamers until the 1970s when I started restoring stationary engines,I now have a collection of reamers,a mixture of straight and spiral flutes,I tend to use spiral flute type in the drilling machine as it clears the swarf easier,care has to be taken when reaming a hole through a cast iron boss fitted to a steel shaft,the mix of swarf tends to jam the reamer,another good lubricant is liquid Rocol.

Chris V28/11/2020 10:29:56
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Well thank you all very much. I have gone for Jason's suggestion of Dormer Supercut.

The online specifications seem to fit my requirements. As an apprentice woodworker 40 years ago now I bought a set of Dormer drills and still use them to this day. It wasn't until Jason's post I knew Dormer made/marketed a cutting fluid, I guess I shouldn't be surprised I didn't know, there's a lot of information and knowledge like that! (-;

Yes I will use the reamers in a UPT to keep it all steady and square.

Thanks again to you all,

Chris.

Andrew Johnston28/11/2020 11:18:21
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I've always used taper reamers by hand and dry, which means no mess to clean up. I set the hole size to drill by measuring the diameter of the pin a bit up from the small end where I think it will actually exit the hole. i agree that the key is light axial pressure and frequent withdrawals. Towards the end the reamer is cutting over nearly the full length. One can "feel" the reamer cutting or shaving really. The steel swarf I got was very fine,almost like a powder. Don't forget to check with the pin at frequent intervals. It's easy to make a turn or two too many with the result that the pin will stick through too far. If anything stop early. In use the pin will be tapped home and so will go in further than quick check by hand would suggest.

Andrew

Chris V28/11/2020 11:22:54
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Thanks Andrew, I guess the amount of force used with the hammer to tap it securely in place is down to part size and experience?

Chris.

IanT28/11/2020 12:18:46
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I've been watching this thread with some interest.

I have some 'clock' taper pins (1 - 1.5mm) in my stock box which I think would be quite useful in some of my smaller modelling projects.

I gather clock makers use cutting broaches (rather than reamers) to fit these? A set of twelve Bergeon cutting broaches covering this size (and more) would cost about £30 - and an unbranded broach set about a third of that. So it seems to me that this is a much better option for me where small tapers are concerned - rather than buying small reamers (assuming I could get a metric tapered one this small) - or when I need to fit larger taper pin.

So, am I missing fundamental something here? I see the word "taper" and do tend to think "reamer" but I suspect a clock maker would instead think "broach".

Am I correct in this assumption or am I missing some basic difference between the two tools?

Regards,

IanT

Andrew Johnston28/11/2020 12:35:08
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Posted by IanT on 28/11/2020 12:18:46in.

Am I correct in this assumption or am I missing some basic difference between the two tools?

Be careful. A taper pin reamer is like a normal parallel reamer with positive rake cutting edges. A clockmakers broach may be of polygonal (usually 5 sides) shape where the "cutting" edges have a large negative rake.

I think there was a thread on this a while back, but I can't immediately find it.

Andrew

old mart28/11/2020 14:29:40
2501 forum posts
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With a small reamer, I would rather use a pin vise than a tap wrench. The hole size depends a lot on the size of the shaft if a gear is to be pinned to it. I have seen tapered drills, but not in sizes smaller than 1/8".

Edited By old mart on 28/11/2020 14:30:03

IanT28/11/2020 16:38:37
1750 forum posts
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Posted by Andrew Johnston on 28/11/2020 12:35:08:
Posted by IanT on 28/11/2020 12:18:46.

Am I correct in this assumption or am I missing some basic difference between the two tools?

Be careful. A taper pin reamer is like a normal parallel reamer with positive rake cutting edges. A clockmakers broach may be of polygonal (usually 5 sides) shape where the "cutting" edges have a large negative rake.

I think there was a thread on this a while back, but I can't immediately find it.

Andrew

Thank you Andrew - I had a look too and wonder if it was this one?

Cutting Broaches on Steel

Steve seems to suggest that he uses them successfully on brass (which is my intended use) but then JohnF says (a bit confusingly) "I would not use the broaches you use on brass, buy another set" . I think he meant not to use the existing "brass" cutters on steel - as it would most likely spoil them for brass use afterwards.

I try to use different cutting tools for each material too - but I think this confirms that cutting broaches will do what I need them for. I wonder if the Bergeon set are worth the difference in price for occasional use. They are only a bit more than that single 1/16th reamer and the larger broach diameters [from 3.75mm] are available singly and are not that expensive [£6 upwards] either.

Anyway - worth a try I think. Thanks

Regards,

IanT

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