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Scroll Saw

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BOB BLACKSHAW27/11/2020 11:32:44
387 forum posts
81 photos

I've been looking to get a scroll saw for shape cutting on wood and max 18g steel,any recommended scroll saws for around £130 please. As usual there's quite a few out there some better than others, I was going for a band saw but most only take a minimum of 1/4 inch blade but 1/8th blade is needed. I am going to make a boat hull but going for a plan and plank the hull.

Thanks Bob

Bazyle27/11/2020 11:52:08
avatar
5695 forum posts
208 photos

FOr metal you need a much slower speed which you won't get in a cheapo one. Look to convert, spend more, or get lucky second hand.

br27/11/2020 12:28:20
207 forum posts
1 photos

I build wooden boats and use a Proxxon band saw with the special Proxxon narrow blade which is 1.3 mm wide.

Fine machine and does alI I ask of it.

br

Edited By br on 27/11/2020 12:29:31

Brian H27/11/2020 12:51:07
avatar
1963 forum posts
108 photos

I too have a Proxxon bandsaw and can confirm its usefulness, on metals as well as wood. The only problem might be the limited throat of just over 6 inches.

Brian

IanT27/11/2020 13:05:18
1749 forum posts
164 photos

I have a reasonably priced scroll-saw Bob (from Lidl). I threw away the blades supplied with the saw and purchased myself a range (tpi & type) of Olson saw blades - the best upgrade you can make. It is a 'vari-speed' saw but I only use it for wood. I think it would cut non-ferrous but I've not tried it. It is generally used on relatively thin wood and plys (2 - 9 mm).

I also have an INCA bandsaw, which is a very nice machine that is no longer made. It can handle blades down to 3mm but needs special blade guides to do so. I do have a 1/4" blade but mostly use various 1/2" blades, as I generally use the saw for re-sizing stock. Some INCAs had motors separate from the saw itself and (with pulley changes) could be used to cut metal but mine is fixed.

I have several ways to cut sheet metal - including nibblers and several jigsaws. My smallest (Proxxon) jigsaw is very light duty but does make a very fine cut. However, most of my small (thin) work is simply cut with a jeweller's saw. It cuts surprisingly quickly and with a little practice is very accurate.

So, I'd suggest you think about the 'balance' of work you need to do with your (model?) "boat hull" and if it's mostly wood-related work - then focus on getting a tool that is good [enough] for that role. If there is not much (thin) metal-work required, a jewellers saw will probably be sufficient to do it.

If you do decide you really must have a multi-purpose scroll saw - then you probably need a Hegner (double your budget) or to find a used 'Diamond' (no longer made). A Diamond will do both jobs for you but take up more room. There was a spate of them on eBay recently (in the region of your budget) and I was tempted but decided I could manage with my existing tools - so common sense prevailed.

Regards,

IanT

Edited By IanT on 27/11/2020 13:13:22

Henry Artist28/11/2020 03:01:02
avatar
120 forum posts
46 photos

When I need to cut intricate shapes in sheet metal (and thin wood) the best thing I have found is an inexpensive fretsaw and a bird's mouth bench hook. Works surprisingly quickly and it's easy to be accurate. It requires very little effort to cut metal this way. When sawing a "sticky" metal like copper it helps to rub a candle on the saw blade.

** LINK FOR FRETSAW **

** LINK FOR BENCH HOOK **

The problem I have found with scroll saws at the budget end of the market is that changing blades can be frustratingly fiddly. Scroll saws intended for trade use are much more "user friendly" but consequently cost significantly more. Only you can decide if the investment in such a tool is justified for what may turn out to be a one-off project.

A small bandsaw may be of more use in general in a workshop. Use it to remove the bulk of material then go in with a fretsaw for detailed cuts.

P.S. The secret to the successful use of a fretsaw or piercing saw is the bench hook yet they don't seem to get mentioned much these days...

BOB BLACKSHAW28/11/2020 08:43:36
387 forum posts
81 photos

Thanks for the replies. Interesting about the bench hook. I agree that the scroll saw that I've been looking at is on the cheap side. but I got a deal with black Friday and got a1/3rd of a more expensive saw. just had to buy it, and a fridge as well.

Thanks Bob

Cornish Jack28/11/2020 09:53:38
1190 forum posts
163 photos

Timing is everything! I have a spare Hegner single speed to be disposed of which would have suited your budget. Good luck with your machine Selecting the right blade (manufacturer and type) is the problem area!

rgds

Bill

Mick B128/11/2020 09:56:29
1801 forum posts
91 photos

I use a Scheppach scroll saw about at the top of your original budget. I don't know if a more expensive one is materially better. Look at the birds towards the bottom of my album - mostly cut from 0,9 - 1,5 mm copper and half-hard brass sandwiched in 5mm plywood - to see the results available.

Edited By Mick B1 on 28/11/2020 10:08:13

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