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Strange Word...

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Neil Wyatt14/11/2020 14:11:42
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I usually add a hyphen or space for clarity, but is there a case for 'crossslide' being valid and the only word in the English language with three consecutive esses?

Neil

Martin Kyte14/11/2020 14:17:11
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2158 forum posts
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My favourite is 5 consecutive ands in a sentence. The Landlord complaining to the pub sign painter for leaving too much sapce between the PIG and AND and AND and Whistle.

:O)

Martin

Speedy Builder514/11/2020 14:24:26
2187 forum posts
152 photos

Probably not Neil - Illnesss (But may be American) !

Weary14/11/2020 14:41:05
319 forum posts

Headmistressship. ??

Howard Lewis14/11/2020 15:07:45
4163 forum posts
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Depends on your spellchecker.

Mine does not like crossslide, but tolerates cross slide. the same for topslide.

And these are supposed to help us!

Howard

pgk pgk14/11/2020 15:12:11
2030 forum posts
290 photos

Hyphenate for clarity since it is a single sub-component...

Who remembers this terrible punctuation exercise: I was plagued by it at school...

James while John had had had had had had had had had had had a better effect on the teacher

Peter G. Shaw14/11/2020 16:56:19
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1232 forum posts
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My personal preference regardless any other consideration is to hyphenate on the grounds of clarity, there being too many of the letter "s". This doesn't apply to topslide because there is only one of each letter.

As far as spell checkers are concerned, my admittedly limited experience of them is that they are American in origin, and therefore anything out of the ordinary is likely to default to the American version.

As far as pgk pgk's example goes, in such an instance I would simply rewrite whatever it was meant to be in order to avoid a multiplicity of words.

Peter G. Shaw

(who being well over 50 is assumed to be able to spell correctly, but who in fact resoundingly failed English Language at 'O' Level GCE.)

Mick B114/11/2020 16:57:28
1802 forum posts
91 photos
Posted by Neil Wyatt on 14/11/2020 14:11:42:

I usually add a hyphen or space for clarity, but is there a case for 'crossslide' being valid and the only word in the English language with three consecutive esses?

Neil

Of course it's valid! There are countless concatenated compound nouns in English; are there rules about omitting any repeating letters just because they may result in unusual combinations?

laugh

Bazyle14/11/2020 18:49:54
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5703 forum posts
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Kreuzrutsche, carro transversal, diastávrosi but quite a few EU languages use the same as us.

English doesn't have a word for everything

**LINK**

Neil Wyatt14/11/2020 19:19:13
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Headmistressship seems bit contrived somehow?

Illnesses would be he UK spelling...

What a strange language though

Neil

norm norton14/11/2020 19:28:07
141 forum posts
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Strangeness might be a personal interpretation of what we see wink

Crossslide is a compounded noun; originally cross slide, then cross-slide but then crossslide might be a compounding too far.

Mick B114/11/2020 20:13:30
1802 forum posts
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Neologophobia

wink

Chris Pearson 114/11/2020 20:42:18
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Neither "crossslide" nor "cross-slide" appears in OED. I suppose that the term really should be "across-slide".

Michael Gilligan14/11/2020 21:07:41
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This seems sensible advice:

The main problem regarding the use of the hyphen is that there are no fixed rules to guide us. There are however certain broad principles that most authorities accept, […]
A familiar hyphenated word should be converted into an unhyphenated single word unless to do so would result in awkwardness of spelling or ambiguity. For example, 'e-mail' easily converts to 'email', but 'cross-stitch' [because of the resultant 'sss'does not.

Edit: I have substituted brackets for the original parentheses, to kill the wretched smiley thing

MichaelG.

.

Ref. **LINK** https://queens-english-society.org/basic-written-english-part-3/

Edited By Michael Gilligan on 14/11/2020 21:12:36

peak414/11/2020 21:16:21
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1327 forum posts
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Posted by Mick B1 on 14/11/2020 20:13:30:

Neologophobia

wink

I wonder is anyone ever follows Susie Dent on Twitter.
This was from a recent weekly competition for odd word from another language.

Susie Dent

The worthy runners up were: for ‘poronkusema’: an old Finnish measurement of around 7.5km, calculated by how far a reindeer can travel before it needs to pee.

Bill

Edited By peak4 on 14/11/2020 21:17:44

Nigel Graham 214/11/2020 22:24:04
916 forum posts
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That is only the second publication I have ever seen of the punctuation puzzle offered by Pgk Pgk.

The first, and slightly different, is in the Puzzles chapter of my treasured copy of The Junior Weekend Book, a present to me when I was about 6! Over half a century and a decade ago.....

That book by the way, if not complete detours, is an eye-opener.

It contains instructions for making a basic ridge tent. Fair enough. And then a simple scow - then not content with that, a more boat-shaped rowing-dinghy (i.e. with a sharp end). No nonsense about asking your Dad to saw the wood for you - it implies just getting on and cutting it. Perhaps Dad was assumed to be busy on his Drummond lathe, or planting spuds. Then off to the local water with the un-plimmed craft and no life-jackets, for your Swallows & Amazons adventures. And when you return home, turn to the sweet-making chapter and make some toffee, now that sugar has come off-ration ( mid-1950s). No nonsense about asking your Mum to boil the molten sugar and butter for you... How did my generation survive?

Mick B114/11/2020 22:32:13
1802 forum posts
91 photos
Posted by Michael Gilligan on 14/11/2020 21:07:41:

This seems sensible advice:

The main problem regarding the use of the hyphen is that there are no fixed rules to guide us. There are however certain broad principles that most authorities accept, […]
A familiar hyphenated word should be converted into an unhyphenated single word unless to do so would result in awkwardness of spelling or ambiguity. For example, 'e-mail' easily converts to 'email', but 'cross-stitch' [because of the resultant 'sss'] does not.

Edit: I have substituted brackets for the original parentheses, to kill the wretched smiley thing

MichaelG.

.

Ref. **LINK** https://queens-english-society.org/basic-written-english-part-3/

Edited By Michael Gilligan on 14/11/2020 21:12:36

Yeah, yeah, yeah - but in the very next sentence he says:

"The hyphen should be used only when it is necessary as an aid to being understood. From this, it follows that if the hyphen is not necessary for that purpose it should not be used."

And it clearly isn't necessary - I've been posting 'crossslide' on here for about 4 years now (except when I forget, as I did somewhere above), and nobody's said they didn't understand. cheekywink

Hopper15/11/2020 01:57:06
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5084 forum posts
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Always opt for clarity. Crossslide is hard to read because of the very unusual string of the same letter and looks like it could be an error or misprint. So it causes the reader to stumble and go back over the word. They will understand it no problem, but it breaks the flow of reading to do so.

Cross-slide is much clearer. The SSS is broken up and the hyphen makes clear that it is a compound noun and the cross slide is not a slide with an unpleasant disposition.

We don't elide top slide or compound slide so I would not do so with cross slide either. Interesting that the two former don't seem to call for a hyphen but the latter still perhaps does, due to that weird string of three S's.

Yes what a weird language indeed.

Edited By Hopper on 15/11/2020 01:59:02

John Olsen15/11/2020 06:23:13
1126 forum posts
92 photos
1 articles

The responsibility is pretty much in Neil's court, since the only authority for what is correct in English is usage. The problem is that usage comes down to what editors allow to be used in their publications. The editors all look up dictionaries and grammar guides, which are based on what editors permitted in the past, so it all proceeds in a vicious circle, with no reform being possible. Hence English spelling and grammar is and will remain a nightmare, not helped by the Latin scholars attempting to impose Latin rules on a non Latin language.

John

pgk pgk15/11/2020 08:31:04
2030 forum posts
290 photos

Some will argue that language is merely a form of communication and should be allowed to evolve but unless one adheres to some consistent roolz re guarding sintax & gramr 1 riscs confushun & degradasion.
Emoticons are a path to ideography...

xslide, +slide, †lide

pgk

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