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Steam plant layout

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Kevin Murrell04/11/2020 12:21:44
50 forum posts
6 photos

Dear all

Finally connected the steam pipes between a Stuart 501 and a 10V and an S50. Very pleased to see it all working.

Short video of it running: https://youtu.be/9fXT8Nre7H0

Couple of questions:

1. Obviously need to sort out exhaust! Would 1/4" tube be ok for that?

2. Is it worth installing a condenser?

3. What about the layout? Ought I try to make it look more like a proper installation? Proper brick flooring and guard rails? Not planning in adding little men operating the plant, but would welcome advice!

Kevin

 

Edited By JasonB on 04/11/2020 14:39:05

Edited By JasonB on 04/11/2020 14:39:31

Emgee04/11/2020 13:57:58
2158 forum posts
265 photos

To make it look like a "proper installation" as you say I would suggest splitting the units into 3 separate "rooms/buildings" but that would make a much larger display so taking it to venues for display purposes would be much more difficult, unless it is permanently kept in a box trailer, or your workshop.

I have no knowledge of steam use so leave those questions for others to respond.

Emgee

JasonB04/11/2020 14:38:52
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Moderator
21451 forum posts
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Stuarts list 3/16" pipe for the S50 exhaust and 1/4 " for the 10V but you could use 1/4" for both.

Rather than a condenser you might be better with an oil separator but not a necessity which will take the steam oil out of the exhaust and also condense some of the steam, what is left can be directed up the chimney.

SillyOldDuffer04/11/2020 16:40:37
Moderator
7566 forum posts
1681 photos

Posted by Kevin Murrell on 04/11/2020 12:21:44:

...questions

1. Obviously need to sort out exhaust! Would 1/4" tube be ok for that?

2. Is it worth installing a condenser?

3. What about the layout? Ought I try to make it look more like a proper installation? Proper brick flooring and guard rails? Not planning in adding little men operating the plant, but would welcome advice!

Kevin

I'd be very pleased if that was mine Kevin, and it's ideal for showing a working engine boiler to family and friends who don't need to appreciate the finer points. Most people!

For more interest a second kind of model replicates a real installation, which might include a lot of brickwork, a condenser, feed-water heating, bunkers and a factory chimney, giving a proper sense of men shovelling coal, pulling levers, and maintaining the engine and whatever it was powering. Waste steam would be fed through a larger pipe. I've seen everything between simple impressionist engine rooms and photo-realistic authenticity. They all work for me! Most of the audience can be wowed with a relatively simple model, but real men seek to impress experts armed with magnifying glasses. A danger with really good models is of detail being overlooked and unappreciated simply because the quality can't be taken in at a glance.

For me the very best models add something beyond normal presentation. Cherry Hill does it by researching and modelling unusual prototypes with immense attention to detail. Another way is to add value with an unusual take on the subject. Many modellers go for pristine, whereas highly polished installations were rather rare in the heyday of steam. Leaks, loose brickwork, patched up gear, dirt everywhere, painted black, poorly lit and with a general air of neglect would be more typical. Models representing tatty industrial reality pull my chain, whilst others prefer gleaming brass and cowboy films with no horse poo anywhere. It's all good.

Dave

br04/11/2020 16:45:37
697 forum posts
3 photos

I used real slate floor slabs, 1/12th scale dolls house supplier, and fitted guard rails.

Would arrange with a central boiler and engine either side nd possibly a dynamo / lamp standard.

Seperate lubricator for each engine - lubricatotors should ideally be as close to steam chest as possible.

A hand operated stuart water pump to a boiler clack would add a nice useful touch.

An " in keeping " oil seperator would not be out of place. Mine, in a similar set up to yours, is a piece of 2 inch copper tube with brass bands around it, made to look like an oil barrel. Horizontal on blocks.

BR

Bazyle04/11/2020 18:05:58
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6042 forum posts
220 photos

If you are running it for any length of time you will be suprised by how much water condenses out on its way to the chimney. Even then where do you think it goes. And that steam oil does not stay in the cylinder. In fact it is a little known fact that steam oil is strongly magnetic and the opposite pole to which it is attracted is white cloth, especially if worn by a woman. So yes, fit an oil trap asap.

Kevin Murrell05/11/2020 09:08:59
50 forum posts
6 photos

Many thanks for all the replies - super helpful! Can anyone point to a design of an oil separator?

Kevin

br05/11/2020 20:30:19
697 forum posts
3 photos

HOW TO MAKE A MODEL STEAM ENGINE EXHAUST CONDENSER OIL TRAP

Just enter above on you tube.

geoff walker 106/11/2020 12:43:30
461 forum posts
180 photos

Nice work, Kevin,

I like the boiler a lot, I'm currently making one myself.

Are there any details about the boiler you could share i.e. construction methods for both the boiler and stand, type of paint used etc.

Geoff

br06/11/2020 13:08:38
697 forum posts
3 photos
Posted by geoff walker 1 on 06/11/2020 12:43:30:

Nice work, Kevin,

I like the boiler a lot, I'm currently making one myself.

Are there any details about the boiler you could share i.e. construction methods for both the boiler and stand, type of paint used etc.

Geoff

The boiler is a commercially made STUART boiler, fromt the 500 series. Probably a 500 or a 501. Stuart have re-introduced the larger 504 which I now have, and it is certainly a fine tem.

geoff walker 106/11/2020 13:47:12
461 forum posts
180 photos

Ah, thanks br,

I thought it was home made!!!

Kevin Murrell06/11/2020 15:04:30
50 forum posts
6 photos

Indeed - it's a Stuart 501 It was in horrible condition when I got it, but stripped it down and removed (carefully) the asbestos panels. One cock-up was painting the side panels and I didn't use heat resistant paint! It bubbled up and fell off! Stripped down again and repainted with very high temp paint and all is well.

(I have a big 504 boiler and that is being paired with a No 9 and a No. 1 - hopefully there is sufficient pressure and volume to power both?)

K.

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