By continuing to use this site, you agree to our use of cookies. Find out more
Forum sponsored by:
Forum sponsored by Allendale Jan 24th

Medical needles

All Topics | Latest Posts

Search for:  in Thread Title in  
BOB BLACKSHAW24/10/2020 09:41:30
366 forum posts
79 photos

After my operation I have 30 needles that have been used,trying to dispose them has been a problem as the chemist will not except them. Looking at them they look a good tool for a oiler on moving parts on engines and other uses. I have made a few steam lubricated and drilling a very small hole I have found that the oil soon goes as the hole is obviously to big but have drilled the recommended size. Would the needle if inserted in the lubricator be to smaller hole for the steam heated oil to pass.

I shall smash them up if this will not work.

Bob

Martin Connelly24/10/2020 10:44:56
avatar
1518 forum posts
170 photos

You should be able to get a sharps disposal box on prescription (hopefully at no cost) then have it collected by the local council (hopefully again at no cost). Alternatively ask the GP if they will accept them for disposal if you take them in next time you are there.

Martin C

Edited By Martin Connelly on 24/10/2020 10:45:56

BOB BLACKSHAW24/10/2020 11:21:18
366 forum posts
79 photos

Tried all that Martin. Shame as the tiny hole in the needle looked useful , I will keep a few and smash them up.

Bob

Bob Stevenson24/10/2020 11:22:10
440 forum posts
7 photos

Hyperdermic syringes and the needles are certainly used for fine lubrication tasks in industry and we have a collection in our clock workshops.... Usually the sharp tips are ground off for safety during use.....the needles for medical use are cut on the slant to give a sharp tip and those in the workshop are flat tipped but whether this was done in house or they can be supplied like that, I don't know. They are an identical fitting to those that my mother used as a diabetic, albeit 50 years ago.

Georgineer24/10/2020 12:59:02
411 forum posts
20 photos
Posted by Bob Stevenson on 24/10/2020 11:22:10:

... those in the workshop are flat tipped but whether this was done in house or they can be supplied like that, I don't know. ...

I have a flat tipped needle which was supplied by the hospital for flushing with salt water after I had a wisdom tooth removed, so they are obviously available like that. That said, it's no difficulty to grind the tip off a pointy one.

George B.

BOB BLACKSHAW24/10/2020 13:12:37
366 forum posts
79 photos

Thanks for the replies.At the moment I'm cleaning a pendulum clock Bob, this is the second time I've done it as it stopped after the first clean after six months. I have put the problem down to a sticky balance after I used proper clock oil, I have recleaned it all with No 1 concentrated cleaning fluid. Putting it back I will use one of these hypodermic needles with a dash of 3 in 4 oil,hopefully that will do the trick, not clock oil.

Bob

Dennis D24/10/2020 13:13:17
72 forum posts
2 photos

You can get flat-tipped needles off eBay. They are generally sold for refilling ink cartridges.

mechman4824/10/2020 13:34:48
avatar
2792 forum posts
431 photos

I got 5 of eBay, arrived flat tipped, I use 3 of them for , lube oil, cylinder oil & for dropping Loctite / studloc on to some of the smaller items that needed it.I use a bit of tape to seal off that one so air doesn't get into the barrel. I don't fill the barrels fully, the two 5ml ones are filled to only 2ml ( oils ) & the one for Loctite ( 2ml ) has only approx' 0.5ml in, as needed, all ideal for model making.

George.

Bob Rodgerson24/10/2020 13:39:00
595 forum posts
174 photos

If I remember rightly they used to be used as burner tubes in model gas turbines.

BOB BLACKSHAW24/10/2020 13:53:44
366 forum posts
79 photos

Seems like they are useful, I'll think I shall hang on to them.

Bob

peak424/10/2020 13:56:17
avatar
1256 forum posts
146 photos

I use them in the workshop for various purposes, air and oil amongst them, both sharp and blunt. I think I'd probably just sterilise them and keep in a box safe somewhere until you find a need.

I also keep new sterile ones in first aid kits etc. as they work well as tiny scalpels for removing splinters and swarf from finger ends.

Bill

Vic24/10/2020 14:59:11
2645 forum posts
20 photos
Posted by peak4 on 24/10/2020 13:56:17:

I use them in the workshop for various purposes, air and oil amongst them, both sharp and blunt. I think I'd probably just sterilise them and keep in a box safe somewhere until you find a need.

I also keep new sterile ones in first aid kits etc. as they work well as tiny scalpels for removing splinters and swarf from finger ends.

Bill

Good idea on the splinters Bill, I never thought of that!

Jeff Dayman24/10/2020 14:59:40
1915 forum posts
45 photos

Needle cannulae / tubes when blunted and silver soldered to bits of drilled sheetmetal make excellent scale hinge parts. Bit of tiny music wire for the pivot, and Robert is in fact your Mum's brother.

(the silver soldering heat will take care of any biological matter or microbial / viral beasties in or on the tube)

Bizibilder24/10/2020 18:12:53
avatar
81 forum posts
7 photos

Try "Blunt dispensing needles" on your favourite auction site - Brings up lots of them.

jimmy b24/10/2020 18:27:32
avatar
678 forum posts
40 photos

I buy my blunt needles, in quite a range of sizes, from ebay, along with syringes. very handy for oiling and gluing.

My doctor showed me the hypodermic trick fr getting splinters out 35 years ago, always kept some in my toolboxes since.

Jim

Rik Shaw24/10/2020 18:52:45
avatar
1370 forum posts
373 photos

I am down to my last two hyperdeemic nurdles and have found them very useful over the years. It had never occured to me to use one for sucking splinters - thanks Jim, much more precise than a solder sucker. You've got me thinking now about solder suckers and blackheads, would that work I wonder?

Rik

John Paton 124/10/2020 20:11:14
avatar
285 forum posts
17 photos

I use all the needles I can get for my 'micro flame' type fine work blow lamp as they quickly burn back if you get the flow rate wrong. ( the type of blow lamp that uses electrolysis to separate oxygen and hydrogen from demineralised water and then recombine them to give an oxy -hydrogen fuel which burns at high temperature without creating soot)

Oldiron24/10/2020 20:21:09
560 forum posts
22 photos

The medical ones are excellent for filling ink cartridges. I have used them for years for that application and also have a couple filled with oil. for the tiny jobs.

regards

mark costello 124/10/2020 20:49:04
avatar
615 forum posts
12 photos

If You have some of the larger sizes They are excellent for blowing chips out of tapped holes. Silver solder one to the end of a standard grease fitting that has 1/8" pipe thread and it will screw into the end of a blow gun.

Simon Collier24/10/2020 22:14:36
avatar
375 forum posts
56 photos

I use them for painting fine lining on gauge 1 locos. Decades ago there were boxes of all metal ones at my lab, the reusable kind. I'd love to have those now. They were thrown out.

All Topics | Latest Posts

Please login to post a reply.

Magazine Locator

Want the latest issue of Model Engineer or Model Engineers' Workshop? Use our magazine locator links to find your nearest stockist!

Find Model Engineer & Model Engineers' Workshop

Latest Forum Posts
Support Our Partners
emcomachinetools
cowells
ChesterUK
Warco
Eccentric July 5 2018
EngineDIY
Eccentric Engineering
Subscription Offer

Latest "For Sale" Ads
Latest "Wanted" Ads
Get In Touch!

Do you want to contact the Model Engineer and Model Engineers' Workshop team?

You can contact us by phone, mail or email about the magazines including becoming a contributor, submitting reader's letters or making queries about articles. You can also get in touch about this website, advertising or other general issues.

Click THIS LINK for full contact details.

For subscription issues please see THIS LINK.

Digital Back Issues

Social Media online

'Like' us on Facebook
Follow us on Facebook

Follow us on Twitter
 Twitter Logo

Pin us on Pinterest