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Stuart 10V First Build - Opinions on Running Please

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duncan webster19/10/2020 00:11:23
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I mean the input /output of the valve of course

Dr_GMJN19/10/2020 08:15:08
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Posted by duncan webster on 19/10/2020 00:11:23:

I mean the input /output of the valve of course

Duncan, I'm afraid you lost me with your post about inlets and exhausts - are you referring to Dave's diagram, or my 10V?

Mick B119/10/2020 09:11:54
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I've got a question on direction of rotation.

How did you decide to run it that way?

I worked from the motorcycle engine I rebuilt under guidance from a friend nearly 50 years ago, and thought it should be clockwise when viewed from timing side.

I can't remember whether the Stuart sheets contained any instruction on that. Anyone know of standard conventions?

Dr_GMJN19/10/2020 09:58:30
611 forum posts
Posted by Mick B1 on 19/10/2020 09:11:54:

I've got a question on direction of rotation.

How did you decide to run it that way?

I worked from the motorcycle engine I rebuilt under guidance from a friend nearly 50 years ago, and thought it should be clockwise when viewed from timing side.

I can't remember whether the Stuart sheets contained any instruction on that. Anyone know of standard conventions?

Mick - just seemed more natural for me to turn the flywheel that way with my thumb, while holding it and looking inside the valve chest. Nothing more scientific than that!

JasonB19/10/2020 10:13:55
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On an engine like this with a cast trunk guide it makes little difference so can be set to what the user wants or needs depending on if it is to be put to use say turning a prop in a boat hull.

If it had a cross head like the No1 then it is usual to set rotation so that the crosshead is pushed down against the more solid cast ways rather than the steel plates that just hold it in place as the conrod/piston rod tries to bend more on the push stroke towards the crankshaft and straighten up on the pull stroke away from it.

Stuart's just tell you how to set in to "the direction of rotation"

duncan webster19/10/2020 10:35:17
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Posted by Dr_GMJN on 19/10/2020 08:15:08:
Posted by duncan webster on 19/10/2020 00:11:23:

I mean the input /output of the valve of course

Duncan, I'm afraid you lost me with your post about inlets and exhausts - are you referring to Dave's diagram, or my 10V?

The throttle valve on the 10V

JasonB19/10/2020 10:38:19
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Looks like the valve is on the side of the steam chest to me. If the steam were to enter from the other (exhaust) side it would tend to lift the slide valve off the port face so not sure what you are saying is wrong.

Edited By JasonB on 19/10/2020 10:38:56

Dr_GMJN19/10/2020 11:00:59
611 forum posts

Yes, it's on the steam chest so that the pressure differential of inlet vs exhaust presses the slide valve against the port face. That's how I understand it's supposed to work?

Someone did post a picture of their 10V on my build thread with it the other way around,and they said it worked fine. I suppose this could be because of minimal float between the valve block and the adjuster plate, but I don't think it's right.

duncan webster19/10/2020 11:01:31
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The throttle valve is correctly positioned on the input to the engine, but connection to the boiler is to what is normally the outlet of the throttle valve. It still works, but as I said before with the valve shut the valve stem packing is still subject to pressure. I'll repeat, it still works, so I'm nit picking, but it could just as easily be 'right'

Dr_GMJN19/10/2020 11:07:11
611 forum posts
Posted by duncan webster on 19/10/2020 11:01:31:

The throttle valve is correctly positioned on the input to the engine, but connection to the boiler is to what is normally the outlet of the throttle valve. It still works, but as I said before with the valve shut the valve stem packing is still subject to pressure. I'll repeat, it still works, so I'm nit picking, but it could just as easily be 'right'

I’m with you now. Yes you’re right, but It just seemed easier to screw the already threaded bit into the chest, and solder the q/r stub into the plain side.

Cheers.

Neil Wyatt19/10/2020 11:38:18
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Posted by Dr_GMJN on 18/10/2020 16:06:03:

Working pressure is about 20 psi, but perhaps it can't generate enough volume of steam to keep it running? I suppose if it was do-able, everyone would just use a cheap boiler like that.

I would like to run it on steam at some point.

I tend to make my engines as 'free' as possible and try and adjust for slow running, so volume of steam isn't a big issue.

Neil Wyatt19/10/2020 11:43:22
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Posted by duncan webster on 19/10/2020 11:01:31:

The throttle valve is correctly positioned on the input to the engine, but connection to the boiler is to what is normally the outlet of the throttle valve. It still works, but as I said before with the valve shut the valve stem packing is still subject to pressure. I'll repeat, it still works, so I'm nit picking, but it could just as easily be 'right'

Here's a puzzle for you to work out Duncan...

image011.jpg

JasonB19/10/2020 12:13:07
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I have run my Stuart beam of of my brothers Mamod traction engine boiler though the paint finish was never the same after holding a blowlamp under the boiler for a bit of extra heatblush

duncan webster19/10/2020 14:32:39
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That's a combined (Pickering) governor and stop valve. The three balls are connected to leaf springs, as the engine speeds up the balls move out and push the centre spindle down. This is connected to a double beat valve which controls engine speed. Governor operation shown in Pickering There is what looks like an identical valve on a Tangye engine in the Bolton Steam Museum, but the picture doesn't show it well BSM

The red handwheel is connected to the stop valve. Tubal Cain (the English one, not that American upstart) did a series of articles on governors in ME back in the mists of time. If anyone is really interested I might be able to find a copy. Governors make nice visual additions to models, but are very difficult to get to work, all sorts of scale effects work against.

John Baron19/10/2020 16:03:32
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Posted by duncan webster on 19/10/2020 14:32:39:

"Tangye engine in the Bolton Steam Museum, but the picture doesn't show it well "

 

That picture looks to be of the Tangye in the Black Country Living Museum near Dudley.

The back drop looks remarkably similar ! I've not been able to find the picture I took !

 

 

 

Edited By John Baron on 19/10/2020 16:04:13

duncan webster19/10/2020 22:38:26
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Neil's picture might be an engine in the Black Country Living Museum, but the one I linked to is in the Bolton Museum, unless it's been nicked! Peaky Blinders operating in Lancashire? They do film it in Cheshire.

John Baron20/10/2020 09:07:32
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Posted by duncan webster on 19/10/2020 22:38:26:

Neil's picture might be an engine in the Black Country Living Museum, but the one I linked to is in the Bolton Museum, unless it's been nicked! Peaky Blinders operating in Lancashire? They do film it in Cheshire.

In that case its been nicked !

These are the pictures I took of it when visiting the Black Country Living Museum in Dudly Nr Birmingham.

05-08-2018-027.jpg

05-08-2018-028.jpg

05-08-2018-029.jpg

05-08-2018-030.jpg

05-08-2018-031.jpg

05-08-2018-032.jpg

Now I've not been to the Bolton Steam Museum yet, this blasted cov19 has seen to that !

These are the pictures that I took in 2017.

Edited By John Baron on 20/10/2020 09:10:06

roy entwistle20/10/2020 10:08:50
1268 forum posts

John. Well worth a visit, if travelling any distance make sure they are open. Usually bank holiday Sundays and Mondays

Roy

duncan webster20/10/2020 12:32:36
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Posted by John Baron on 20/10/2020 09:07:32:
Posted by duncan webster on 19/10/2020 22:38:26:

Neil's picture might be an engine in the Black Country Living Museum, but the one I linked to is in the Bolton Museum, unless it's been nicked! Peaky Blinders operating in Lancashire? They do film it in Cheshire.

In that case its been nicked !

These are the pictures I took of it when visiting the Black Country Living Museum in Dudly Nr Birmingham.

05-08-2018-027.jpg

But that's not the one in my link, it's the one in Neil's post. Case against Peaky Blinders not proven

John Baron20/10/2020 17:13:51
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Aah, Duncan, I see you were referring to horizontal one smiley I should have checked the link...

I was referring to the one Neil posted ! I'll call it crossed wires cheeky

Actually there is a horizontal Tangyes in the Markham steam museum near Doncaster and a splendid Corliss engine too. But unfortunately closed for the duration.

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