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Best way to remember Mill movements when turning hand wheels

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Chris TickTock16/09/2020 18:52:58
604 forum posts
42 photos

Hi Guys,

Is there any easy to remember way of knowing if I turn the respective hand wheels on a Mill's X, Y & Z axis the stock moves right or left or the Z axis goes up or down etc.

It is all to easy to turn a wheel the wrong way. If there is any thing fine else I will just make a table to glance at should I have a senior moment.

Chris

ChrisB16/09/2020 19:07:38
548 forum posts
192 photos

Put arrows on the table indicating the direction of handwheel rotation and table movement.

Vic16/09/2020 19:10:33
2619 forum posts
20 photos

I try to remember clockwise moves the vice away from me.

Edited By Vic on 16/09/2020 21:31:15

John Hinkley16/09/2020 19:15:25
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953 forum posts
325 photos

Practice, practice, practice. Then some more practice!  'til it becomes second nature.  If it's any consolation, I don't "practice" what I preach and often have to think about it!

John

 

Edited By John Hinkley on 16/09/2020 19:17:09

Sandgrounder16/09/2020 19:17:26
200 forum posts
6 photos

I just think that turming it clockwise is like screwing a screw in with a screwdriver, it goes in away from you.

DMB16/09/2020 21:51:53
1016 forum posts

Hi Chris TickTock,

I am right handed and using my right hand, turning X axis wheel @ RH end of table clockwise, table moves forward away from RH extremity or if you like, from Right to Left. Likewise, Y axis wheel turned clockwise makes table move away from me towards body of mill. My mill has a fixed Z axis spindle because it has a rise and fall knee with the operating handle below the table and to the right of the knee. Again, winding wheel clockwise makes the table rise up, which seems to be quite natural. Just like "Sandgrounder" said, above and as John Hinkley above said, practice. Good luck, happy metal butchering!

John

Dave S17/09/2020 07:55:43
59 forum posts

It becomes second nature after a period.

Im not sure right now (at work) which way turning does what, but I know if I’m stood in front of my machines I can “just” use them.

This became very obvious when I bought a cheap x-y table to make a cutter grinder.
The cheap table had RH threads on both axis. It only took a couple of oops moments for me to change the Y one to LH to match all proper mills...

Dave

Michael Gilligan17/09/2020 08:09:56
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16422 forum posts
715 photos
Posted by Dave S on 17/09/2020 07:55:43:

.
It becomes second nature after a period.

[…]

.

This reminds me of a ‘classic’ problem in Ergonomics ...

I forget the exact details of the disaster, but basically a ship was in trouble and a drain-cock needed to be urgently closed ... but the seaman reverted to instinct, and ‘turned it down’ as one would with an amplifier knob.

MichaelG.

Edited By Michael Gilligan on 17/09/2020 08:12:04

SillyOldDuffer17/09/2020 09:09:27
Moderator
6346 forum posts
1395 photos

Some unfortunate souls have more trouble with this than others - I'm one - but the answer is practice. Physical skill like learning to reverse a car. Milling machines are my bete noir because I'm not good at thinking up/down, right/left and forward/back at the same time. I'm not afraid to draw arrows on machines as a reminder!

DRO's are wonderful on milling machines, a truly 'must have' accessory. One of many benefits is their ability to quickly show small movements in the wrong direction because the display changes more obviously than a dial. And my tiny mind deals better with numbers increasing and decreasing than remembering how jobs are oriented relative to dial readings.

No help at all, but the next logical step is CNC. Although very stupid, computers don't make human mistakes like forgetting which way they're going, messing up mental arithmetic, or miscounting dial turns.

Dave

Nicholas Farr17/09/2020 09:18:27
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2443 forum posts
1193 photos

Hi, I don't have a problem of which way the the table moves with respect to the turning of the handles, but there has been odd moments to which way I have to move the table and have to stop and think for a moment, seems strange, but hey, none of us are infallible.

Regards Nick.

Mike Poole17/09/2020 10:28:45
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Moderator
2752 forum posts
64 photos

Using two handles at once to try and follow a curve is funsmiley

Mike

Macolm17/09/2020 14:25:22
17 forum posts
4 photos

My first lathe has a mix of feed directions, and no, I never had confidence which. The solution was to inscribe arrows beside the hand wheels as follows;-

feeddirection.jpg

Bazyle17/09/2020 14:35:25
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5492 forum posts
207 photos

Posted by Michael Gilligan on 17/09/2020 08:09:56:

I forget the exact details of the disaster, but basically a ship was in trouble and a drain-cock needed to be urgently closed ... but the seaman reverted to instinct, and ‘turned it down’ as one would with an amplifier knob.

During the tunneling for the first Severn tunnel it flooded. A flood door was not closed so a diver was sent down to close it - a very very remarkable feat in the 19th century. However though he closed the door enabling the workings to be pumped out he opened instead of closed a drain valve associated with the door making the job a bit more difficult.

Pete Rimmer17/09/2020 14:44:32
788 forum posts
50 photos
Posted by Michael Gilligan on 17/09/2020 08:09:56:
Posted by Dave S on 17/09/2020 07:55:43:

.
It becomes second nature after a period.

[…]

.

This reminds me of a ‘classic’ problem in Ergonomics ...

I forget the exact details of the disaster, but basically a ship was in trouble and a drain-cock needed to be urgently closed ... but the seaman reverted to instinct, and ‘turned it down’ as one would with an amplifier knob.

MichaelG.

Edited By Michael Gilligan on 17/09/2020 08:12:04

I guess that guy never washed his hands after using the loo, because natural instinct for a water tap is to turn it off clockwise.

mechman4817/09/2020 16:15:01
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2759 forum posts
424 photos

If you remember the adage.. 'Righty tighty.. lefty loosey for nuts, screws etc; how about .. 'right- to you, left- to to me' in regard to mill table & vice moveable jaw... ref. to a couple of tv brothers.. laugh devil.

George.

Neil Wyatt17/09/2020 16:23:56
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Moderator
18250 forum posts
714 photos
77 articles

The problem is that although most mills move consistently across all three handwheels, there are certainly exceptions, often the Z axis.

So to be on the safe side first try all the axes and see if they move in the same sense.

If so, make one sign, if not, make three...

Neil

old mart17/09/2020 17:19:32
2007 forum posts
155 photos

Practice will make it second nature, I said as I tried to move the Y axis with the wheel on the rotary table. surprise

Clive Foster17/09/2020 18:08:36
2389 forum posts
77 photos

The clockwise / anti-clockwise thing always defeated me at exactly the most disastrous moment!

What works for me is to think in terms of work movement under the tool. Bit like the right hand - left hand lathe tool thing.

I knwo which way to turn the handles to pass the work under the tool from left to right or front to back bot whether its clockwise of anti-clockwise I couldn't tell you without standing at the machine and twiddling. Makes no difference whether I'm using left or right table handle on the Bridgeport. Things go the way I was expecting.

Seems to me that thinking about which way to turn the handle is an extra step in the learning.

Clive

Chris TickTock17/09/2020 19:32:11
604 forum posts
42 photos
Posted by Clive Foster on 17/09/2020 18:08:36:

The clockwise / anti-clockwise thing always defeated me at exactly the most disastrous moment!

What works for me is to think in terms of work movement under the tool. Bit like the right hand - left hand lathe tool thing.

Clive

I like this Clive, thanks and thanks to all for posting

Chris

Michael Gilligan17/09/2020 23:13:37
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16422 forum posts
715 photos
Posted by Pete Rimmer on 17/09/2020 14:44:32:

I guess that guy never washed his hands after using the loo, because natural instinct for a water tap is to turn it off clockwise.

.

smiley

Allegedly ... in times of emergency, the more common instinct is to turn something off [or down] in an anticlockwise direction, regardless of its actual function.

I’m pretty sure it was documented by KFH Murrell ... if I can find the reference I will post it.

MichaelG.

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