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Gloves in a Bottle

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Blue Heeler16/09/2020 07:00:35
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217 forum posts

I asked about this stuff and a few of you recommended it to me.....its great stuff and now I wouldn't be without it! Hope this helps someone out who hasn't heard of it.

Bo'sun16/09/2020 08:18:43
202 forum posts

I think in the "olden days" it was called barrier cream. Still available I suspect.

IanT16/09/2020 09:05:03
1613 forum posts
151 photos

I've been using GIAB for a while now and it's a bit more high tech than barrier cream if you read the blurb.

I seem to have developed a few skin sensitivities or possibly I'm using something now that I'm sensitive to (chicken or egg?) but this certainly helps. I've nothing objective in the way of tests but I know when I've forgotten to use it within a day or two.

I only use a 'pea' sized amount each time, once a day before I go down the main workshop, working it well into the skin. I run a fairly "dry" inside workshop, so don't worry so much in there but my larger machines are all kept well oiled and I use cutting oils & various solvents down there too - so that's when I tend to have problems. I also use gloves of course but not when operating the machines.

It's not cheap but then a small bottle goes a long way. Apparently, it doesn't wash off, bonding with the top skin layer, so you can wash your hands (for coffee/lunch) without reapplying in theory.

If you have skin troubles in the workshop - I'd recommend trying it and it could also help to prevent these problems in the first place too. Some things become more of a problem as you get older it seems.

My local Superdrug stocks it.

Regards,

IanT

Paul Lousick16/09/2020 09:10:53
1541 forum posts
578 photos

Much better that the old barrier cream.

Paul

IanT16/09/2020 09:27:06
1613 forum posts
151 photos

I've just watched the video above and as I've already stated, I think this is good protection to use in the 'dirty' workshop but I'd take any claims about providing any further protection with a large dose of salt.

I was not sure of what was being suggested with the talk of Police etc using this product routinely - but in these 'Covid' days, I'm certain that it isn't a replacement for actual  "Gloves" in many instances (e.g. where real gloves obviously need to be worn). I wouldn't take the "Gloves in a Bottle" description too literally....

IanT

Edited By IanT on 16/09/2020 09:28:32

Greensands16/09/2020 09:42:04
136 forum posts
14 photos

I have always been a user of the product whose name which rhymes with omega, the green variety of course, not the orange and would never think of making a change. After 50 years of using it I have never had any problems and swear that it has even done me a lot of good in keeping arthritis at bay.

pgk pgk16/09/2020 09:56:01
1912 forum posts
288 photos
Posted by IanT on 16/09/2020 09:27:06:

I've just watched the video above and as I've already stated, I think this is good protection to use in the 'dirty' workshop but I'd take any claims about providing any further protection with a large dose of salt.

I was not sure of what was being suggested with the talk of Police etc using this product routinely - but in these 'Covid' days, I'm certain that it isn't a replacement for actual "Gloves" in many instances (e.g. where real gloves obviously need to be worn). I wouldn't take the "Gloves in a Bottle" description too literally....

IanT

Edited By IanT on 16/09/2020 09:28:32

Rather difficult to remove and bin after a visit to the supermarket <g>
In days of yore the poor man / farmers, option was udder cream but that seems to have got celebrity status now when googled.
In my professional career I met folk who reacted to the latex in latex gloves, others who reacted to the corn starch used to powder those gloves and some who reacted to one, other or both common pre-scrub antiseptics. There's no one size fits all (I take an 81/2 surgical glove)...

pgk

Michael Gilligan16/09/2020 09:58:42
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16365 forum posts
714 photos

When in doubt ... first have a look at the Safety Data Sheet : **LINK**

https://www.glovesinabottle.com/wp-content/uploads/download/SDS_GIAB_SPF15.pdf

Then find someone who can actually explain what the ingredients might do

dont know

MichaelG.

Speedy Builder516/09/2020 10:52:06
2107 forum posts
146 photos

I notice that the video doesn't show him putti on his hands or taking it off - A bit suspicious to me !!

Peter G. Shaw16/09/2020 10:56:05
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1166 forum posts
44 photos

Udder cream is still available as "Udderley Smooth Moisturizing Cream". Made by Redex in the USA. I have this stuff because I am on chemotherapy which amongst other things causes the skin on my fingers (in the main) to dry out and crack with the obvious painful results. Provided I keep up with it, it certainly prevents the cracks, and surprisingly, any cracks that do develop clear up very quickly indeed. Mine was supplied to me by my local Chemotherapy Clinic, but I do know that it is available on the open market in tubes and tubs.

Peter G. Shaw

Nicholas Wheeler 116/09/2020 11:30:01
391 forum posts
20 photos

I started using a similar product DERMASHIELD, when I worked as a recovery driver. I found that continual use of dirty, wet ratchet straps plus the mechanical work was making the tips of my fingers split in the winter. Gloves didn't help, as they soon became as wet and dirty as the equipment. Traditional barrier cream doesn't last long, needs to be applied to clean hands which is rarely possible when out and about,and takes a while to dry so isn't feasible to apply per job.

Dermashield applied at the first job lasted most of a twelve hour shift, dries almost immediately and is never greasy, and solved my painful problem in less than a fortnight. You don't use much, so a £20 can lasted me a winter. That means what looks a bit expensive is actually extremely good value. When I needed to replace the first can, I bought the pack that included a small one to go in the toolbox.

It's also good for dirty jobs or when using chemicals as your hands clean up much easier.

Blue Heeler16/09/2020 12:01:24
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217 forum posts

Its been absolutely brilliant for me. There's no way to take it off (your don't even know its on there) it just wears off supposedly when your skin sheds.

I put it in on twice a day and its fixed my cracking skin from washing all the different crap that I get on them during a day in my workshop...paint, varnish, oils, grease everything just come off under the tap much more easily.

Baz16/09/2020 12:09:20
473 forum posts

Greensands do you mean swarfega, what is wrong with naming the product.

mechman4816/09/2020 12:11:19
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2749 forum posts
423 photos

I generally only go into my garage/ workshop for a couple of hrs a day, maybe 3-4 times a week & I use barrier cream that I get from Mach.Mart, much like the old 'Rozalex' barrier cream, but a much more cream like consistency. I use a 100ml pump dispenser & 1 squirt lasts me all the time I'm in the 'cave'. It dries very quickly when rubbed in & so far have not had any adverse reactions, very reasonably priced too...I also wear vinyl gloves when needed, especially when working with Cast Iron, that stuff gets every where as we all know.

**LINK**

Usual disclaimer applies.

George.

duncan webster17/09/2020 21:25:03
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2795 forum posts
41 photos

Many of there products contain or at least used to contain lanolin. This comes from washing sheep's fleeces and was extracted from effluent by Bradford sewage works at Esholt not sure how many cosmetic users know they are using a sewage bi product

Bill Dawes17/09/2020 21:36:27
363 forum posts

Reminded me of my apprentice days on the shop floor back in the 60s, we used pink stuff called Rozalex, it didn't soak in, just had this goo on your hands which were black within a few minutes starting work (we used a lot of cast iron in those days) Amazed to see it is still available, hadn't heard of it for years.

Bill D.

Paul Rhodes17/09/2020 21:57:11
19 forum posts

Michael G's link is for a different product.Its active chemicals confer SPF.

The native product seems like a simple moisturiser with dimethicone and glycerin being prominent. The beauty is the lack of perfumes and nasty preservatives.

Dr Wayne Weber MD appears to be a 78 year old gynaecologist and I see no claim that he is a "Board Certified Dermatologist" other than in the advert. It my limited research is true, makes his endorsement less than weighty you might think.

If it works use it. I would.

pgk pgk17/09/2020 23:13:52
1912 forum posts
288 photos
Posted by duncan webster on 17/09/2020 21:25:03:

Many of there products contain or at least used to contain lanolin. This comes from washing sheep's fleeces and was extracted from effluent by Bradford sewage works at Esholt not sure how many cosmetic users know they are using a sewage bi product

..and the most expensive perfumes are musk based... made from the anal sac secretions of musk deer.

Many products have unsavoury origins but get refined before use. Follicle stimulating hormone used to be extracted from menopausal nun's urine, for example. Most folk here will be aware of the historic collection of human urine by the barrel.. some shipped by coastal craft from London to Oop North for use in the textile dye industry. The rancid urine formed ammonium nitrate as a dye mordant or for use in gunpowder manufacture?

Recycling is in again.

pgk

Michael Gilligan18/09/2020 00:01:59
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16365 forum posts
714 photos
Posted by Paul Rhodes on 17/09/2020 21:57:11:

Michael G's link is for a different product.Its active chemicals confer SPF.

[…]

 

.

Sorry for the apparent error ... I thought perhaps I was exposing an underlying truth !

Do you have the SDS for the product in question ?

MichaelG.

.

Edit: If it’s this one : https://www.glovesinabottle.com/wp-content/uploads/download/SDS_GIAB.pdf

then there is very little disclosed.

Another Edit: ... and it appears from the descriptions on this page : https://www.glovesinabottle.com/

that there is an ‘original formula’ and a version with added sunscreen

There is a drop-down menu item on that page INGREDIENTS & BASIC INFO ... it’s worth a look.

Edited By Michael Gilligan on 18/09/2020 00:45:01

Paul Rhodes18/09/2020 11:43:43
19 forum posts

Michael, an easy mistake to make . Even with your misreading of the product your call to

read the SDS rather than the advertising blurb is well made.

I was nearly adding to your post that the active ingredients your post highlighted were not in play in the product

referenced by the OP.

Like you I read the ingredients of the original /native formula and concluded that there was no magic dust involved.

Was that your conclusion?

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