By continuing to use this site, you agree to our use of cookies. Find out more
Forum sponsored by:
Forum sponsored by Allendale Jan 24th

Myford chuck not gripping

All Topics | Latest Posts

Search for:  in Thread Title in  
Ro10/07/2020 19:04:38
31 forum posts
35 photos

So, I’ve recently acquired an old Myford super 7 and I’m loving using it, with one exception.

It came with a 4 inch Pratt Burnerd 3 jaw chuck, and I’m finding that if I take a cut of 1mm or more on steel (EN1A-PB) the work will move in the jaws.

I have tightened up the jaws fairly tight, but after reading warning about over tightening I don’t want to really crank it down.

Having had a mini lathe for the last 15 years or so, I’ve got used to how much I need to tighten the chuck on that, and I’m definitely applying at least as much torque on the Myford, and probably a bit more.

So, should I just crank down on the chuck key to hold the work, or is there something I can do to the chuck to make it grip better?

John Haine10/07/2020 19:16:12
3529 forum posts
194 photos

Just give it some welly...

JasonB10/07/2020 19:24:20
avatar
Moderator
19538 forum posts
2136 photos
1 articles

When you say it moves doe it get pushed back into the chuck or spin? If it spins where do the jaws leave a mark. If the mark is deeper towards the back of the jaws they are probably worn and bellmouthed

Bill Davies 210/07/2020 19:33:44
205 forum posts
11 photos

Perhaps the scroll needs some lubrication.

Ro10/07/2020 19:37:38
31 forum posts
35 photos

Jason: It spins and moves back. Just tried it and the mark is towards the back of the jaws. Can I just regrind them with a dremel held in the toolpost? Or is it not that simple?

Bill: I have lubed the scroll with the jaws taken out, but I haven’t stripped it down yet.

Edited By Ro on 10/07/2020 19:38:22

J Hancock10/07/2020 19:41:11
504 forum posts

As long as you only use the chuck key and your hands to tighten the work it is most unlikely to break anything.

UNLESS you are using it near to fully open capacity, then all bets are off.

Ro10/07/2020 19:57:36
31 forum posts
35 photos

J Hancock & John Maine: I’ve just tried giving it some welly, and I really had to fight it to get it to grip. I had to go so far that I was getting visible imprints of the jaws in the steel.

And to add info to Jason’s question, yes the imprints were from the rear of the jaws.

JasonB10/07/2020 20:04:17
avatar
Moderator
19538 forum posts
2136 photos
1 articles

You need to find a way to put tightening load onto the jaws when you grind them, there are various jigs or a simple washer at the back of the jaws can be used, a search of the forum will throw up a few results

old mart10/07/2020 20:15:21
2467 forum posts
169 photos

These chucks are very easy to dismantle, clean and regrease, yours may benifit from a little tlc.

If you have some silver steel. of other ground stock like the plain shank of a 1/2" drill in undamaged condition, then you could try chucking it up lightly so you can just turn it by hand, and then wiggle it about. You should be able to tell if the jaws are looser at the front or not. If the are not touching at the front, they are bellmouthed.

Perhaps a cut of 1mm is expecting too much from a little chuck in a Myford.

Edited By old mart on 10/07/2020 20:22:16

Edited By old mart on 10/07/2020 20:25:51

Baz10/07/2020 20:32:19
524 forum posts
2 photos

Oh please! Perhaps a cut of 1mm is expecting too much, I regularly rough out EN1a with cuts 1/8 deep, 1/4 inch off diameter on a Super 7.

Ro10/07/2020 20:40:09
31 forum posts
35 photos

Ok, cool. Thanks for all the advice.

I’ll give the chuck a bit of TLC tomorrow and then check if it needs the jaws ground. Sounds like a fun Saturday project.

oh, and I’m glad to know I should be able to take even deeper cuts laugh

Harry Wilkes10/07/2020 21:26:44
avatar
1024 forum posts
63 photos

Ro there are a few videos on youtube showing how it's done LINK Removed, See Code of Conduct

and there are others a search should find them

H

Edited By JasonB on 11/07/2020 06:54:39

Bandersnatch10/07/2020 22:33:49
avatar
1719 forum posts
60 photos

Since no one has mentioned it, you are going around the chuck tightening all the jaws evenly - not tightening from a single position?

not done it yet10/07/2020 23:02:39
5372 forum posts
20 photos

That video nicely demonstrates how not to improve the runout on a GRIPTRUE chuck?

The Novice Engineer10/07/2020 23:25:28
79 forum posts
59 photos

A tip given to me by an old machinist to true up the jaws is as follows

Select a grinding stone that has a diameter so it can pass through the rear of the chuck.

Turn up a ring that will fit over the jaws so that when they are opened against the ring ,the grinding stone will pass through.

Now gently stone the jaws till true.

Not done it myself, but he did sort out an old chuck for me.

An alternative might be to source some replacement jaws Pratt Burnerd use to do spares .

Hopper11/07/2020 01:31:12
avatar
5052 forum posts
114 photos
Posted by The Novice Engineer on 10/07/2020 23:25:28:

A tip given to me by an old machinist to true up the jaws is as follows

Select a grinding stone that has a diameter so it can pass through the rear of the chuck.

Turn up a ring that will fit over the jaws so that when they are opened against the ring ,the grinding stone will pass through.

Now gently stone the jaws till true.

Not done it myself, but he did sort out an old chuck for me.

An alternative might be to source some replacement jaws Pratt Burnerd use to do spares .

You have that bass-ackwards. If you open the jaws against a ring around the outer edge of the jaws, as some YouTube videos wrongly show, you will push the outer edges of the jaws inwards and thus grind MORE off the already worn ends of the jaws.

Issue 267 of MEW has an article on the right way to do it, on a Myford ML7. Secret is to make a clover leaf, aka spider, or even three flat spacers to push the ends of the jaws OUTWARDS when the chuck jaws are tigthened against them.

Here's my version of it:Not my original idea. Copied from an ancient Duplex article in ME years ago.

picture 4. chuck regrinding. overview of plate fitted to chuck..jpg

Ro11/07/2020 15:26:30
31 forum posts
35 photos

Thanks all for your help.

this morning I stripped the chuck down and found that the jaws were very tight in a couple of places in the scroll.

A bit of work with a file sorted out burrs that had formed in those places. Then after reassembly, the chuck was a lot easier to tighten, but still had the same problem wit regards to gripping.

I made up a quick top hat and trued the jaws with a carbide boring bar and the top hat held in the back of the jaws (then reversed the top hat to the front and did the same for the very rear of them).

The jaws now grip fully along the length and don’t slip at all!

I was slightly worried about the work on the scroll affecting the runout, but after testing at multiple diameters I seem to be getting a maximum of about 3 thou.

thanks again for all your advice

ro

old mart11/07/2020 15:36:55
2467 forum posts
169 photos

That runout you now have is about par for the course, if you want better, a four jaw independent chuck is the way to go. They take more getting used to, but worth it.

JasonB11/07/2020 16:15:27
avatar
Moderator
19538 forum posts
2136 photos
1 articles

I'd have thought you would have ended up with better being the jaws were trued in place.

As for par for the course I'll stick with my less than 1/2thou out of the box 3-jaw and Old Mart can keep his wonky onesdevil

not done it yet11/07/2020 16:23:59
5372 forum posts
20 photos
Posted by old mart on 11/07/2020 15:36:55:

That runout you now have is about par for the course, if you want better, a four jaw independent chuck is the way to go. They take more getting used to, but worth it.

Or a griptru - like the chuck on the video! i just luuv videos like that. Correcting bell-ended jaws Is one thing, but talking about improving run-out by grinding the jaws of a griptru chuck seems rediculous.

Edited By not done it yet on 11/07/2020 16:25:04

All Topics | Latest Posts

Please login to post a reply.

Magazine Locator

Want the latest issue of Model Engineer or Model Engineers' Workshop? Use our magazine locator links to find your nearest stockist!

Find Model Engineer & Model Engineers' Workshop

Support Our Partners
Eccentric July 5 2018
cowells
emcomachinetools
ChesterUK
EngineDIY
Warco
Eccentric Engineering
Subscription Offer

Latest "For Sale" Ads
Latest "Wanted" Ads
Get In Touch!

Do you want to contact the Model Engineer and Model Engineers' Workshop team?

You can contact us by phone, mail or email about the magazines including becoming a contributor, submitting reader's letters or making queries about articles. You can also get in touch about this website, advertising or other general issues.

Click THIS LINK for full contact details.

For subscription issues please see THIS LINK.

Digital Back Issues

Social Media online

'Like' us on Facebook
Follow us on Facebook

Follow us on Twitter
 Twitter Logo

Pin us on Pinterest