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Set up tool???

Not sure what this is for.

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bernard towers19/05/2020 17:03:16
18 forum posts
43 photos

f5c1ccca-1a40-4a4b-9300-e4c10023d8ac.jpegfound this today whilst having a lockdown clear out, any ideas?. 10 inches long.

Edited By bernard towers on 19/05/2020 17:04:13

Howard Lewis19/05/2020 17:14:00
3375 forum posts
2 photos

It may be an indicator to centre work?

Howard

Martin Connelly19/05/2020 17:49:34
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1399 forum posts
164 photos

If you have a small bar with a dimple in it that can mount in a lathe tool holder you can pin the short rod between a workpiece with a centre dimple and the bar. The long arm will describe a large circle if the workpiece is not centred allowing workpiece centring regardless of outline or having a suitable indicator.

Martin C

Peter G. Shaw19/05/2020 17:52:37
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1121 forum posts
44 photos

It's a cheap homemade centring tool. Usually there is a fixed bar with a dimple in in which the pointed end inside the ring rests. The sharp end outside the end rests in a dimple in the work. As long as the fixed bar maintains the short rod in contact with the work, then as the work rotates, the out of centre amount is magnified by the long length which describes a circle in free space. Adjustment of the work can then be made until the long end remains stationary at which point the work is centered.

Somewhere I have a book with a drawing for it, but can't lay my hands on it at the moment.

Peter G. Shaw

larry phelan 119/05/2020 18:10:44
766 forum posts
14 photos

Check Good -Old -Sparey.! You will find that tool mentioned in his book, and it works !

Neil Wyatt19/05/2020 18:21:40
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Moderator
17970 forum posts
709 photos
77 articles

Well you lot beat me too it!

Neil

bernard towers20/05/2020 11:54:57
18 forum posts
43 photos

Thanks a lot it’s obvious once explained, just couldn’t figure out how to use the pointed rod which was enclosed in the center. Amazing the information out there!

Hopper20/05/2020 12:30:58
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4649 forum posts
101 photos

What do you suppose that ring with the 4 square bosses is made from? Commercial casting or kit? Or cut from some extruded section etc the maker found lying around?

It's a cool old piece of kit from back when dial indicators were a luxury item in the home shop. I mightbhave to make one.

Adrian R220/05/2020 12:34:28
23 forum posts
3 photos

Interesting technique. It occurs to me that one could achieve the same with a straight rod pushed through a rose joint, perhaps held in the toolpost or on a mag base.

Can you then rely on the centre dimple to check tailstock alignment?

jason udall20/05/2020 18:59:09
2025 forum posts
41 photos

Rose joint....

Lump of rubber. Long wire(knitting needle).. continuously adjustable ratio.....

Jon Cameron21/05/2020 09:03:46
336 forum posts
90 photos

Hi,

May have to make one of these. I assume having the two lengths the smaller end is used for roughing the centre of the work, then rotate 180 degrees, and you have a fine adjustment.

Would be interesting to see how accurate this could be by checking with a DTI. and seeing which method appears quicker to use?

Jon

Brian G21/05/2020 09:54:54
705 forum posts
28 photos
Posted by Jon Cameron on 21/05/2020 09:03:46:

... I assume having the two lengths the smaller end is used for roughing the centre of the work, then rotate 180 degrees, and you have a fine adjustment...

The device can only be used with the small end toward the workpiece as it has to be held between the internal point and the centre mark. The long end amplifies the movement in the same way as a lever indicator (here) making it easier to see the error.

Brian G

ANDY CAWLEY21/05/2020 10:12:34
169 forum posts
47 photos

I seem to recall a similar idea either on here or in HSM or MEW or some such where the centering rod was held at its pivot point by silicone adhesive. I think it was a bit of square tube with the maximum size hole drilled across it, the end of the tube filled with silicone and the wiggler pushed through the cross drilled hole. The square tube was of a size that it fitted in a tool holder.

Edited By ANDY CAWLEY on 21/05/2020 10:13:59

Jon Cameron21/05/2020 10:40:00
336 forum posts
90 photos
Posted by Brian G on 21/05/2020 09:54:54:
Posted by Jon Cameron on 21/05/2020 09:03:46:

... I assume having the two lengths the smaller end is used for roughing the centre of the work, then rotate 180 degrees, and you have a fine adjustment...

The device can only be used with the small end toward the workpiece as it has to be held between the internal point and the centre mark. The long end amplifies the movement in the same way as a lever indicator (here) making it easier to see the error.

Brian G

Ok I have totally misinterpreted the replies above, I was under the impression that a rod with a centre drilled into its rear and a point on the other end was held in the centre punch mark, and held with the tailstock, this tool then clamps to the rod and draws the circle in the air.

Thanks for the link to the website.

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