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Macro-photography

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Sam Stones04/06/2020 22:08:19
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764 forum posts
304 photos

My eureka moment.

Never having tried free (parallel) viewing of a stereo pair, and pondering over the difficulties experienced by various members, I realised (as has probably been explained earlier) that the centres of the two parallel viewing images need to be about the same distance apart as our eyes.

It then dawned on me why Nick’s method of displaying the images on his phone worked.

I took a screen snapshot off my PC monitor with my phone, practiced a bit, and was delighted to see the 3D image slide into view. Backing off was necessary in order to achieve sharp focus.

Using the zoom of the phone screen to adjust the centres of the two images to about 7cm (the centre distance of my eyes), didn’t work so well. It worked better when the two phone images were about 5cm apart.

On this basis, it is now clear (to me) why parallel viewing won’t work when the centre distances of the two images don’t (roughly) match our eye separation. I suppose if you can do ‘wall-eyed’ then viewing a large screen (tablet etc.) is also achievable?

Sam

Edited By Sam Stones on 04/06/2020 22:09:47

Michael Gilligan04/06/2020 22:34:16
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15894 forum posts
693 photos

We found a Bird Pellet in the garden ... Probably from a Little Owl, by the look of it.

These two photos show the full frame from my Micro Four Thirds camera, with the Minolta close-up lens attached, and the 14-45mm zoom lens at 45mm and f16. The grid is 4mm squares

Shown here to demonstrate the coverage at closest focus distance and the reasonable absence of barrel or pincushion distortion.

If anything interesting is found, on dissection of the pellet, I will do some close-ups.

p1250951.jpg

.

p1250952.jpg

Click the images for larger display.

MichaelG.

Sam Stones05/06/2020 22:45:15
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304 photos

Purchased a considerable time ago, the primary use for a bellows was to get up close and personal with sectioned samples.

Electronically coupled between the lens and camera (predating digital), the bellows was an excellent adjunct to my Canon kit. At the time, it was particularly useful for displaying the results of how the screw threads of plastics lids, caps, and closures matched the respective threads and lips on bottles and containers.

To digress further from the ‘Macro’ theme, here’s a typical situation where a cap is screwed onto a bottle.

screw-cap-on-bottle---merge.jpg

It can be only be surmised how the cap actually fits on the bottle. Inverted and potted in resin however, examination in detail becomes possible.

With some of the vagaries of crystalline polymers, aspects of shrinkage could result in small changes of thread profile etc. The ‘quality of fit’ was often a matter of torque tests versus leakage. Potting and sectioning could expose design and tooling errors; sharp notches are a significant cause of premature failure.

This was also an issue with the fit of snap-on container lids. By their very nature, thread profiles (and undercuts) of softer plastics could readily take up their own position during capping. With that degree of uncertainty, a way of accessing their actual position (after assembly) was not easy.

To gain access (after torquing), it was necessary to remove a portion of the bottle near the neck. Inverted in a suitable container, the epoxy resin was drizzled into the space. A vacuum removed trapped air. To avoid an excess of adiabatic heating and the consequential softening of the plastics components, it was important to minimise the volume of epoxy for any one pour. Several ‘pours’ becoming necessary for larger items.

After the epoxy had cured, it was my usual practice to machine the assembly; across the centreline with a capped bottle. Smoothed and polished, I then photographed the prepared face at a macro-level.

Returning to the bellows,

img_4344 - novoflex bellows.jpg

with an extension range between 50mm and 126mm, the bellows can take over from a typical set of extension tubes of say 12mm, 20mm, and 36mm that would only stack to 68mm, or 80mm as with your set Raphael. I have no doubt that both tubes and bellows could be stacked for even greater extension. Others here could perhaps comment upon the limitations, e.g. depth of field, etc.

Here are a couple of earlier images taken with my Canon EOS 300D camera, through the Novoflex bellows and a Canon EF 100mm f/2.8 Macro USM.

06 - crw_7023---100mm---bellows-retracted.jpg

05 - crw_7022---100mm---bellows-extended.jpg

As with a variety of stuff accumulated over the years, I have to admit that the bellows is seldom in use these days.

Having ventured into stereo pairs, I intend to find a subject which will feature both the bellows and macro lens while providing a bit more 'fun' for us who are cross-eye 'gifted'.

Sam

PS - I'm looking forward to seeing any interesting bits you find in the bird pellet Michael.

Edited By Sam Stones on 05/06/2020 22:47:03

Michael Gilligan07/06/2020 09:54:59
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15894 forum posts
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Having mentioned the Minolta Achromatic close-up lenses

Here is a copy of the instruction leaflet: **LINK**

http://photojottings.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/06/CloseUpchart.pdf

... useful for general reference.

MichaelG.

Raymond Griffin07/06/2020 13:53:46
53 forum posts
38 photos

blood vessels l (2).jpgAnother stereo pair showing blood vessel in kidney. I am having trouble deciding how to present these. My slides are bound up as pairs for projection. I take them apart and scan in the Nikon scanner. The one labelled right is on the right in my projector with the emulsion side facing the lens of the projector. Could be different when viewed as photos. Raymondblood vessel r (2).jpg

Raymond Griffin07/06/2020 13:54:40
53 forum posts
38 photos

PS Left is top and right is bottom

peak407/06/2020 14:12:02
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1118 forum posts
133 photos
Posted by Michael Gilligan on 07/06/2020 09:54:59:

Having mentioned the Minolta Achromatic close-up lenses

Here is a copy of the instruction leaflet: **LINK**

http://photojottings.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/06/CloseUpchart.pdf

... useful for general reference.

MichaelG.

This page is worth bookmarking as well re. supplementary macro lenses

http://fuzzcraft.com/achromats.html

I've a couple of Sigma ones.

Bill

Michael Gilligan07/06/2020 15:49:37
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15894 forum posts
693 photos

Excellent link, Bill ... Thanks for sharing it.

MichaelG.

Michael Gilligan07/06/2020 15:57:42
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15894 forum posts
693 photos
Posted by Raymond Griffin on 07/06/2020 13:53:46:

[...]

I am having trouble deciding how to present these.

[...]

.

Your presentation is absolutely fine, Raymond ... and the images are astonishing

Anyone with an interest in Stereo should be quite capable of pairing them to suit personal preference.

MichaelG.

peak407/06/2020 16:30:10
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1118 forum posts
133 photos
Posted by Michael Gilligan on 07/06/2020 15:57:42:
Posted by Raymond Griffin on 07/06/2020 13:53:46:

[...]

I am having trouble deciding how to present these.

[...]

.

Your presentation is absolutely fine, Raymond ... and the images are astonishing

Anyone with an interest in Stereo should be quite capable of pairing them to suit personal preference.

MichaelG.

I don't know how others see these, but I always see 3 images, with the centre one being in 3D
I was struggling to work out how to easily view vertically stacked ones in a forum thread on a PC screen.
It's only just dawned on me that I could use my second screen.

That one's set up in vertical/portrait format. I can just drag or copy this tab over to the other screen, and then swivel it back to landscape.
Unlike a phone, there's no auto sensor, so is shows the forum displayed at 90°.
I can't read the text easily, but the 3D image pops out beautifully.

It rather remind me of tales about my Mum years ago, when she was working at the local TSB to prepare for decimalisation.
She'd been getting headaches, which was eventually diagnosed as being due to a lazy eye, so she was given some eye exercises to complete. One of these was two partially drawn rabbit images, that she had to stare at until the popped into a single complete rabbit. (the picture was really designed for kids).
From a colleague taking the mick; - Which one of the two little bunnies are you looking at today Dorothy?
Mum, without really thinking - The middle one of course.
Much laughs and they still let her count the money. smiley

Bill

Nicholas Farr07/06/2020 19:01:36
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2318 forum posts
1137 photos

Hi, while listening to Tina Turner's greatest hits this afternoon, I took a few photos with my Canon 40D and my new 35mm Macro lens. Two photos of my late elder brothers dedicated Austin leather key ring fob and two photos of his gearstick knob that he never got to fit. He probably bought them from our local K.J. Shortis store, I found the in a tin in my collapsed shed last year and have suffered the savages of time, the ring on the fob is not the original though as it was very rusty and I discarded it. The first one is with the right hand lens light on half light, and as it was taken in portrait, and is lighting it from above.

key ring fob.jpg

This next one is with natural daylight and is a bit closer and with depth of field setting, as you probably will observe.

key ring fob 2.jpg

I think underneath the scratch after the figure 1, was an 8, but he had an 1100 and it looks like he tried to scratch an extra 1 in. The next photo is the top of the gearstick knob again with a half lit right lens light, some degrading of the logo can be seen.

gear stick knob .jpg

This last one is the gearstick knob looking at it from what would have been the drivers side, and also with the right hand half light on and depth of field setting, while the finish on it is remarkably good, the wood has shrunk and split over the metal threaded insert.

gear stick knob 2.jpg

A couple of simple things, but I thought the might be interesting macro photos.

Regards Nick.

Edited By Nicholas Farr on 07/06/2020 19:07:37

Sam Stones07/06/2020 20:40:11
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764 forum posts
304 photos

Raymond, I took the liberty of placing your fascinating pair of kidney images both ways.

Five minutes was all it took me in Photoshop.

Here is the pair for free crosseyed viewing ...

crosseyed-.jpg

And now the pair for free (or stereoscope) parallel viewing ...

parallel.jpg

As I have realised, if the distance between this second (parallel) pair is greater than your own eye separation, it can't be free-viewed.

I think I've got that right. If not, can someone correct me.

It doesn't seem to matter that there is a slight vertical difference. Once the images are 'locked' I can tilt my head slightly either left or right and the images stay locked. 

Sam

Edited By Sam Stones on 07/06/2020 20:44:25

Sam Stones08/06/2020 00:48:50
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764 forum posts
304 photos

This picture is another break from true macro.

crw_5722---spur-winged-plover---cropped---03---lh.jpg

My main reason for showing it was that it was photographed through my macro lens; a Canon EF 100mm f/2.8 USM, also described as a medium telephoto lens.

A pleasing feature of this lens is the ultrasonic auto-focus. It is both extremely fast while being very quiet. There is no doubt I would not have captured this shot without the high speed focussing. As those who know, this bird keeps its eyes level during flight, so I have to admit that I’ve tilted and severely cropped this picture for more drama.

By diving at me from various directions, the spur-winged plover was protecting its young. Each ‘attack’ was ‘called off’ with a sharp disconcerting swerve about two metres in front of me.

Although it seems possible, there is no evidence to show they use those spurs to cause injury.

Sam

Brian O'Connor08/06/2020 18:02:17
68 forum posts
16 photos

berties tick.jpg

Picked this little chap off my dog

Michael Gilligan08/06/2020 19:24:58
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15894 forum posts
693 photos
Posted by Brian O'Connor on 08/06/2020 18:02:17:

.

Picked this little chap off my dog

.

dont know Must admit I had never seen the like of that

... But I‘ve just found this: **LINK**

http://www.irishdogs.ie/news/2017/05/24/dog-owners-warned-of-risks-from-disease-carrying-ticks.html

MichaelG.

Sam Stones09/06/2020 00:28:12
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764 forum posts
304 photos

A fortunate dog, Brian.

Could some of the tick's legs have broken off, or is it just their angle?

Although like MichaelG I hadn't known of those ticks in the UK, of about 75 species of tick here in Australia, there’s one known as the paralysis tick ... Ixodes holocyclus.

Often hidden under the animal's coat, a single tick is capable of killing a large dog.

Sam

Brian O'Connor09/06/2020 07:37:05
68 forum posts
16 photos

This one had obviously had a good feed of my dog's blood, they are tiny when empty. You have to be very careful how you remove a tick because you can leave the mouth parts behind, which can fester and make the dog very ill. I used a special tool you can buy which was probably responsible for some of the legs being pruned.

Michael Gilligan09/06/2020 07:55:58
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15894 forum posts
693 photos
Posted by Nicholas Farr on 07/06/2020 19:01:36:

Hi, while listening to Tina Turner's greatest hits this afternoon, I took a few photos with my Canon 40D and my new 35mm Macro lens. Two photos of my late elder brothers dedicated Austin leather key ring fob and two photos of his gearstick knob that he never got to fit. […]

A couple of simple things, but I thought the might be interesting macro photos

.

Thanks for sharing those, Nick yes

The choice of appropriate lighting is half the battle

MichaelG.

Michael Gilligan09/06/2020 14:41:52
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15894 forum posts
693 photos

This is way off-topic, but I’m presuming that most photographers have wide interests **LINK**

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/in-pictures-52934802

Pictures from the Sony World Photography Awards

MichaelG.

Raphael Golez09/06/2020 16:14:30
121 forum posts
120 photos

Enjoyed the recent photos posted here.

Michael, Thanks for the link. Enjoyed it.

BW,

Raphael

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