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Stuart 10V Build Log - Complete Beginner...

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Dr_GMJN10/10/2020 22:00:56
702 forum posts

Every time I looked at the connecting rod:



...I saw an Elephant’s leg.

By mistakenly sawing off the turning spigot, I gave myself a problem in how to hold it to subsequently taper-turn the shaft. The main bearing block is turned to a diameter, so I decided to try and make a split fixture for that end, and clamp an aluminium block in the little end for centre drilling:



I drew it out on CAD, and settled on a 3 degree included angle taper. After setting the compound slide to 1 1/2 degrees, try as I might, I couldn’t get any of my turning tools to do it in one pass. I ended up doing half, then re-setting the tool and doing the rest. After a quick polish you can’t see the join. It now looks better:





Also cleaned up all the Little end pin end, the stud ends and bolt heads - most of them had prominent pips:



So now I’m waiting for some supplies to make the unions and open up the cladding holes, and it’ll be on to assembly and testing.

It’s worth noting that as I went through all the supplied fasteners, I found two of the nuts were half-nuts - probably for the eccentric clamp bolt. I’d already made my own half nuts by turning down some standard ones. I’ll just use the supplied ones for the big-end caps instead.

Dr_GMJN12/10/2020 17:44:52
702 forum posts

Made an inlet union - I based it on the quick-release air supply from my airbrush:











Now for an exhaust stub.

Dr_GMJN12/10/2020 21:47:16
702 forum posts

One thing I need to sort out: all the threaded parts I’ve made are horribly loose fitting. When I’ve got a split die I’ve always sprung it open as much as possible, but to no avail. I wonder if the taps I’ve got are loose tolerance? Something’s definitely not right in the threading department.

Actually - I say “all”, but thinking about it, it’s really the larger threads on the inlet fitting and gland nuts that are by far the worse.

 

Edited By Dr_GMJN on 12/10/2020 21:48:50

JasonB13/10/2020 07:02:22
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Moderator
19556 forum posts
2142 photos
1 articles

I've had a few ME dies bought in recent years that don't cut a particularly good thread so that may be the problem.

Nigel McBurney 113/10/2020 09:38:13
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777 forum posts
3 photos

I have had the same experience,with me,brass and bsp.eg taps that have no clearance and jam in holes,plus dies that do not cut, nowadays I tend to bite the bullet and get HSS ground thread. I have British made BA and 40 tpi taps/dies,carbon steel cut thread now over 50 years old which still cut to size,its the source thats the problem,too much made from "bamboo"

Dr_GMJN13/10/2020 21:23:08
702 forum posts

Made a simple exhaust stub by threading some brass tube:





Also turned down some fibre washers so they fit on the drain cock spot-faces. I can adjust the washer thicknesses until the orientation of the drains is right when tight:









Still waiting for a step drill for the cladding, then that’ll be it.

Dr_GMJN14/10/2020 20:09:26
702 forum posts

I’ve got a Wilesco valve that I might try to use on the 10V somehow:



I suppose I’m scratching about looking for things to make until the step drill arrives and I can call it done, but anyway. The black plastic wheel looked a bit cheap, so I made a replacement out of scrap brass:



Bolted it to some brass hexagon bar and put in the vice, then got the centre using the edge finder:



Then co-ordinate drilled the holes in the correct orientation for milling the edge detents using the hexagon bar as a 60 degree angle fixture:





Then back in the lathe for parting off and profiling the faces:



Used a square file to open up the central hole to suit the original slotted plate. I’d used a 4mm drill so the circumference quadrant points could be used a filing limit for the square edges:




Dr_GMJN15/10/2020 21:47:22
702 forum posts

Step drills arrived today:



I used some parallels to extend the jaws upwards, and put masking tape on the surfaces to give some extra grip, then re-aligned the pilot holes:



The drain cock holes were less than 1mm from the edge, but the drills worked really well:



Exhaust hole wasn’t a problem:



I ended up spraying it satin black, then cleaned up the edges with wet & dry:





So final assembly and testing next.

Dr_GMJN17/10/2020 10:00:25
702 forum posts

Final assembly time. Here are the component parts:



I made an adjustable stud insert tool to get all the heights the same:





I used PTFE tape, as per Jason's suggestion, but plaited to give some bulk, instead of using the rather flaky stuff in the kit:



Ready for testing:





I’ll post some better pics and a video of it running when I get chance. Thanks!

mechman4817/10/2020 10:41:06
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2821 forum posts
436 photos

Dr_GMJN

...'Also cleaned up all the Little end pin end, the stud ends and bolt heads - most of them had prominent pips:...

These generally indicate that your tool tip centre height is incorrect; either too high or more is the probability too low, needs adjusting. Never the less superb workmanship, looking to see it running, well done that man!.

George.

Dr_GMJN17/10/2020 11:01:33
702 forum posts
Posted by mechman48 on 17/10/2020 10:41:06:

Dr_GMJN

...'Also cleaned up all the Little end pin end, the stud ends and bolt heads - most of them had prominent pips:...

These generally indicate that your tool tip centre height is incorrect; either too high or more is the probability too low, needs adjusting. Never the less superb workmanship, looking to see it running, well done that man!.

George.


Thanks very much George. The studs and bolts were supplied with the kit, so not guilty on those! I made the pin, and it did have a pip - In general getting tool height right is something I need to work on. It’s a pain whenever I change an insert tip to a different type for example.

roy entwistle17/10/2020 11:22:34
1300 forum posts

When you bolt it to the wooden base. I personally would like to see nuts on top rather than screw heads.

For a first build, very well done. I admire your attention to detail.

Roy

Mick B117/10/2020 11:35:11
1801 forum posts
91 photos

That's a pretty impressive result, paying off a lot of assiduous work.

Dr_GMJN17/10/2020 15:19:34
702 forum posts
Posted by roy entwistle on 17/10/2020 11:22:34:

When you bolt it to the wooden base. I personally would like to see nuts on top rather than screw heads.

For a first build, very well done. I admire your attention to detail.

Roy

Thanks Roy - I'll turn the bolts round.

Dr_GMJN17/10/2020 15:19:58
702 forum posts
Posted by Mick B1 on 17/10/2020 11:35:11:

That's a pretty impressive result, paying off a lot of assiduous work.

Cheers Mick. Much appreciated.

Dr_GMJN17/10/2020 15:24:40
702 forum posts

Here are some better finished images:
















Thanks for all the help and advice over the past 5 months everyone; I'll post some videos up in a minute for comments. Cheers!

Dr_GMJN17/10/2020 15:40:28
702 forum posts

Guys, I ran the engine for the first time last night. It worked first time on a rough valve setting, which I got from this thread and reading the "Building the Stuart 10V" book. It had a tight spot at the bottom of the crank throw, but nothing serious. I did put the gland packing in, but just nipped up. The rods slide freely up and down. The valve timing hasn't been touched, but the tight spot has now eased considerably.

You may notice the screw in lace of the upper drain cock. It snapped off on tightening, I probably shouldn't have used PTFE tape. Anyway, minor detail.

You have NO IDEA how amazing it was for me (and the family!) to see this engine running for the first time. I know its about as simple as it gets, and it's no big deal for the old hands on here, but I can tell you I'm hooked. I'm already looking forward to my next build.

I quickly realised that despite me thinking it sounded brilliant, I have no real idea what a 10V should sound like, or what noises it should make under various loads and conditions. With this in mind - and also to show the results of a lot of great help and advice from this forum, I've made some video clips. I would really appreciate any comments on how you think it's running, and any adjustments I might need to make. In many ways it's irrelevant: I've built it, it runs, and I love it, but still I need to know. I hope these links work. They are posted on my son's drawing channel, so if you stray on to any of his videos by mistake, please trun the music volume down, as it may be bad for the hearing/wellbeing.

Slow/Medium speed, 10 psi (air)

**LINK**

Fast/Medium speed, 30 psi (air)

**LINK**

Turning by hand, 30 psi (air)

**LINK**

Under light load, 30 psi (air)

**LINK**

Muffled exhaust (ie mainly mechanical noise), 30 psi (air)

**LINK**

I am also going to post this in the "Beginners" forum. Thanks.

Ramon Wilson17/10/2020 17:54:57
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914 forum posts
151 photos

You certainly deserve to be congratulated on such a stunning result for your first attempt at ME yes

A superb log throughout and an excellent outcome. A fine runner too - superb tickover

Only one minor observational critique - the cheese head mounting screws are out of place to my mind - nuts would be much more in keeping.

Well done indeed

Looking forwards to what you will do with that Twin Victoria

Ramon

Dr_GMJN17/10/2020 18:01:52
702 forum posts
Posted by Ramon Wilson on 17/10/2020 17:54:57:

You certainly deserve to be congratulated on such a stunning result for your first attempt at ME yes

A superb log throughout and an excellent outcome. A fine runner too - superb tickover

Only one minor observational critique - the cheese head mounting screws are out of place to my mind - nuts would be much more in keeping.

Well done indeed

Looking forwards to what you will do with that Twin Victoria

Ramon

Much appreciated Ramon, and thanks for your comments and advice throughout this thread.

Roy also commented about the screws. I have already put the nuts on top, but they are standard nuts, not the ME types on the rest of the engine. I will swap them out when I order the fasteners for the Victoria.

geoff walker 117/10/2020 19:08:43
438 forum posts
168 photos

Great finish Doc, well done, I love the parade of parts, very regimental not a part out of place.

Well you've set the standard now, no going backlaugh.

I suspect you will have no problem maintaining it.

Geoff

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