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Use of Torx Bits in Hex Skt Hd Screws

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Tim Hammond06/05/2020 11:22:32
68 forum posts

In several YouTube videos recently, including one by Clickspring this morning, I've noticed the use of Torx bits in cap head screw rather than the usual hexagon bit. Intrigued by this, I tried a series of Torx bits in various screwheads and found they fitted far more snugly than the hex bits, especially Torx+ bits. Does anyone else use Torx bits in these applications?

Ian Parkin06/05/2020 11:24:25
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987 forum posts
232 photos

I have found that a damaged hex cap head responds better to a torx bit hammered in to remove it

Michael Gilligan06/05/2020 13:06:04
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19291 forum posts
960 photos

A couple of thoughts:

  • A good quality hex key, the proper size for a good quality socket screw should be entirely adequate.
  • A Torx driver will, inevitably deform the socket in a poor quality screw if much torque is applied

That said ... Ian makes a very good point.

MichaelG.

Vic06/05/2020 16:02:42
2954 forum posts
8 photos

You can buy Torx cap head screws, are you sure it wasn’t one of those rather than a Hex drive?

Tim Hammond06/05/2020 16:15:21
68 forum posts

I don't think so, I've just had another look at Clickspring's video (Using a dial indicator to set a 44* topslide angle), and all the threaded fasteners shown on his lathe look to be ordinary hex socket head cap screws. Have a look and see what you think. (I may be mistaken, wouldn't be the first time!)

Steviegtr07/05/2020 00:59:10
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2272 forum posts
313 photos

Torx is the way to go as long as the bolt is good quality & the tool is too. Most car manufacturers are using them now.

Steve.

old mart07/05/2020 13:42:58
3411 forum posts
210 photos

It is useful to know that Torx bits could get a hex screw moving if it is damaged.

Grindstone Cowboy07/05/2020 14:29:50
758 forum posts
60 photos

I could be wrong, but it looks to me like it's just a hex key with shiny corners, not a Torx bit, and they are ordinary hex-recess cap screws?

Regards,

Rob

I.M. OUTAHERE07/05/2020 14:46:45
1468 forum posts
3 photos

I think you will find the Torx bit is only driving on the tips and in a high torque situation will fail - a bit like a 12 point socket verses a hex socket on a hex bolt or nut . There is a reason why impact sockets are all hex design .

Mick B107/05/2020 16:12:51
2046 forum posts
117 photos
Posted by XD 351 on 07/05/2020 14:46:45:

I think you will find the Torx bit is only driving on the tips and in a high torque situation will fail - a bit like a 12 point socket verses a hex socket on a hex bolt or nut . There is a reason why impact sockets are all hex design .

+1. When they work well, it's because Torx bits are *usually* decent steel, where hex keys explore the full spectrum of quality from end to end...

wink

Enough!07/05/2020 16:33:31
1719 forum posts
1 photos
Posted by Tim Hammond on 06/05/2020 11:22:32:

In several YouTube videos recently, including one by Clickspring this morning, I've noticed the use of Torx bits in cap head screw rather than the usual hexagon bit.



I went to youtube . Clickspring > videos > sort-by-date-latest and the latest listed was 7 months ago.

I link would be helpful.

Oldiron07/05/2020 17:38:00
864 forum posts
23 photos

Clickspringclips      It's on his second channel.

regards

Edited By Oldiron on 07/05/2020 17:50:04

Robert Atkinson 207/05/2020 18:09:50
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1106 forum posts
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That video shows a hex key in a hex cap head. Key is polished on the corners that mkes it look a bit like a Torx.

Right bit of quality make is best. Identification can be an issue I have hex in metric and imperial (down to 0.035", Bristol Spline, Torx, RIBE TS and various vehicle size spline bits.

Robert G8RPI.

KWIL07/05/2020 18:28:17
3445 forum posts
66 photos

Polished corners also allows access at an angle as the toolpost obstructs a clean vertical approach to the cap head, there are of course hex drivers that have the necessary shape to allow angular offset.

Michael Gilligan07/05/2020 18:31:03
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19291 forum posts
960 photos

Posted by Mick B1 on 07/05/2020 16:12:51:

[…]

hex keys explore the full spectrum of quality from end to end...

.

For one end of that spectrum It’s worth looking at p33 [= p35 of the PDF] here: **LINK**

http://www.unbrako.com/images/downloads/engguide.pdf

The other end is Cheese, I believe

MichaelG.

Neil Wyatt08/05/2020 10:47:14
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18807 forum posts
733 photos
80 articles

Just out of interest, a torx bit is designed to make the turning force more nearly tangential to the faces of the bit.

Sadly using a torx bit inside a hex hole does not provide the same advantages as using a 'lobed' socket on a rounded hex.

Neil

Vic08/05/2020 12:15:49
2954 forum posts
8 photos
Posted by Grindstone Cowboy on 07/05/2020 14:29:50:

I could be wrong, but it looks to me like it's just a hex key with shiny corners, not a Torx bit, and they are ordinary hex-recess cap screws?

Regards,

Rob

Yes, I had a quick look and it was as you say, an ordinary hex bolt and driver, the driver just had shiny corners.

Pete Rimmer08/05/2020 12:26:19
1096 forum posts
69 photos

Anyone who works regularly on Japanese motorbikes more than a few years old knows that if you round off a socket head because of ill fitting/corrosion/poor quality fastener or reduced engagement due to road filth or corrosion, beating a torx bit into the hex will almost always get you out of lumber. The combination of hammering to break the bond and the firm fitting of the torx will often cause the thread to release (or the tool to break) before it will cam out or round off.

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